1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

AINGER, James

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National Archives, Kew CO48/41, 71/72

Fareham 17th August 1819

Sir,

Being desirous of becoming one of the intended Colony at the Cape of Good Hope and circumstances rendering it impossible for me to make personal application at the office of the Colonial Department at present I hope I may be allowed, by letter to become a Candidate for a Grant of Land under the conditions specified in Lord Bathurst's Circular Letter.

I am of the Medical Profession and in Practice at this place and although I have hitherto made good all my payments, I have no reasonable ground for hoping that the Profit of my Profession will much longer answer the demands of an increasing Family, much less enable me to make any Provision for them hereafter.

I am thirty-three years of Age - my Constitution is good and my habits steady and regular. I certainly am not very conversant in Agriculture, but have no doubt surmounting any difficulties arising from their course by application. I by no means intend relinquishing my profession altogether - on the contrary. I have great satisfaction in the idea of exercising it for the benefit of any of my fellow Creatures who may stand in need of its aid.

I can command a Small Capital, & will engage to take the charge of ten persons or families at least. In case of being so fortunate as to be considered eligible, and if I might be allowed to ask any questions, I would enquire how many persons or families one settler may be allowed to take out - if they are selected by himself or not - and as what time they are to leave this country?

I beg leave to apologise for trespassing so much upon your time but I am anxious the true motive of any application should be apparent and that you should not consider it the effect of unsteadiness or caprice, instead of an anxious wish to seize what appears to be a favourable opportunity of making a provision for my family and which I have no hope of doing in my present situation.

In case of being considered not eligible, I need not suggest to you Sir how important to my interest it will be that this application should not be known out of your office.

If I am in any way guilty of any impropriety or impulsivity I must hope your indulgence and that you will attribute it to my lack of knowledge. - I shall only add a hope of being provided with the result of my application as soon as it is consistent with your convenience.

I have the Honour to be Sir

Your very humble and most obedient Servant

James AINGER