GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

Selected Settler Correspondence 1820 - 1837

Whereas ALL the 1819 correspondence was transcribed (see CO48/41 through CO48/46 at the National Archives), whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape, here only letters by known settlers or their families, or letters of great relevance to the 1820 settlers, have been transcribed. There are many other letters in later files, thought not to be written by eventual settlers. However, if an ancestor is known to have emigrated after the 1820 settlers then it might be worth looking through the rest of the correspondence, which is arranged alphabetically. The relevant files for letters written in 1820 are CO48/52 (A-L) and CO48/53 (M-Y). Later files are labelled "Original Correspondence" followed by the year, and can be found from CO48/56 (1821) to CO48/186 (1837).

Unless otherwise stated letters were written to either the Secretary of State for the Colonies or his deputy. The original correspondence is filed in order of receipt. Here it has been placed in alphabetical order according to the surname of the writer, with letters by the same writer in chronological order, for ease of reading. Original spelling has been maintained. Reference numbers, where given, refer to printed page numbers stamped on the letters and will enable visitors to the National Archives to locate the letter more easily.

COLLEN, William, 1827

National Archives, Kew, CO48/114, 111

19 October 1827

The Memorial of William COLLEN late of Algoa Bay, residing at no 37 Somerset Street, Portman Square,

Humbly Sheweth,

That your Memorialist left England in November 1819, being then in his 18th year, on board The Chapman Transport, Capt. MILBANK, and landed at Algoa Bay on the 10th April following amongst the first Settlers of that part of the African Coast:

That, with a view to a permanent occupation of his time in agricultural and mechanical persuits, Your Memorialist had attached himself to a Mr Henry LOVEMORE( the Proprietor of an extensive estate called Bushey Park, about ten miles from the Bay, and of another on Luangas Flat) for the term of three years; at the expiration of which, that Person was to obtain a Grant of Land for your Memorialist and to establish him thereon : but, in consequence of the loss sustained by the said Mr LOVEMORE of the principal parts of his personal effects by a calamitous Fire, your Memorialist's papers of Assistance through his medium were disappointed; and he therefore continued on the estate of that Individual for a considerable time after the fulfilment of his engagement:

That Your Memorialist hath more recently employed himself, principally, in journies to and from Grahams Town, Cradock, Somerset, and other districts in the interior of the Colony; in the course of which he has acquired much information useful to a Settler: and, being now most anxious to obtain by the grace and favour of His Majesty's Government, a Grant of such a competent portion of Land as may enable him to fix himself permanently in that Country, Your Memorialist is returned lately to England, for the purpose of Humbly representing his situation and views ; having, in the mean time, committed his stock of Cattle to the care of the said Mr LOVEMORE:

Your Memorialist therefore humbly prays your favourable consideration of his Case; and that you will be pleased to recommend him to the Grace and Favour of the Crown, for a Grant of Land, to the extent of one thousand acres, or thereabouts, in some district near the coast on the Kromme River, and at as little distance from Algoa Bay as may be convenient.

And your Memorialist shall etc

(signed) William COLLEN

37 Somerset Street

Postman Square

October 19 1827

[note from Colonial Office across bottom: Ans'd verbally 20 Dec that no land was to be had in the quarter for which he applies]

 

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National Archives, Kew, CO48/114, 134

37 Somerset Street, Portman Square

December 22 1827

Sir,

In Conformity to your directions when I had the honour of waiting on you, I take the liberty to acquaint you that my wish on becoming a colonist in the Cape of Good Hope is to possess about one thousand acres of land in as desirable a situation as can be assigned to me by His Majesty's Government at that Settlement: and, from the experience which I have acquired during a residence of eight years in the colony, I am enabled to express my assurance that, with a due degree of perseverance and the recommendation to the Favour and Indulgence of the Government there, with which you, Sir, may have the goodness to honour me, I will succeed in my undertaking. In the event, however, that, from any unforeseen circumstances my best endeavours should not be followed by success, such failure would be my misfortune, and I could not, in such case presume to have any claim to some liberation from the Colonial Department.

I have the honour to be, Sir,

Your obedient and very humble Servant

William COLLEN

 

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National Archives, Kew, CO48/114, 136

Dec 24 1827

Mr. COLLEN presents his respects to Mr. HAY and trusts that he will forgive him for saying that in case he should be determine to send the recommendation of his brother Mr William COLLEN to the Governor of the Cape of Good Hope not by his hand, he will be extremely obliged if he will have the goodness to give him a note to identify him on his arrival at the Cape

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