GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

Selected Settler Correspondence 1820 - 1837

Whereas ALL the 1819 correspondence was transcribed (see CO48/41 through CO48/46 at the National Archives), whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape, here only letters by known settlers or their families, or letters of great relevance to the 1820 settlers, have been transcribed. There are many other letters in later files, thought not to be written by eventual settlers. However, if an ancestor is known to have emigrated after the 1820 settlers then it might be worth looking through the rest of the correspondence, which is arranged alphabetically. The relevant files for letters written in 1820 are CO48/52 (A-L) and CO48/53 (M-Y). Later files are labelled "Original Correspondence" followed by the year, and can be found from CO48/56 (1821) to CO48/186 (1837).

Unless otherwise stated letters were written to either the Secretary of State for the Colonies or his deputy. The original correspondence is filed in order of receipt. Here it has been placed in alphabetical order according to the surname of the writer, with letters by the same writer in chronological order, for ease of reading. Original spelling has been maintained. Reference numbers, where given, refer to printed page numbers stamped on the letters and will enable visitors to the National Archives to locate the letter more easily.

MARTINSON, George, 1820

Filed with Dispatches of Sir Rufane DONKIN

National Archives, Kew, CO48/49, 95

Spanish Reed
5 June 1820

To His Excellency Major General Sir Rufane Shaw DONKIN KCB, Acting Governor of the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope, Commander in Chief

The Memorial of George MARTINSON

Humbly sheweth

That Memorialist came to this Colony as a settler under the direction of Mr. CROSSE [sic – should be CRAUSE], that in November last Memorialist went on board the Nautilus Transport to provide for and make arrangements for the comfort of his family previous to their embarkation. The vessel dropt down the river and, proceeding to sea, got on the Goodwin Sands, that on the ship’s righting she finally proceeded to sea without stopping either at the Downs or at Portsmouth, at one of which places Memorialist had been assured by Mr. WALTON the Master the ship would touch and remain at least for a week, and where Memorialist had determined to embark his family.
Memorialist therefore humbly hopes Your Excellency will be pleased to forward this or what other statement Your Excellency may judge requisite on an occasion of such a nature to His Lordship the Earl BATHURST, Colonial Secretary, recommending Memorialist’s case, and Memorialist thereby hopes again soon to feel the enjoyments of life so much to be desired (that of again having his family with him) and trusts that his wife and family who were so unfortunately left in England will be sent to this Country.

Any information or direction to his wife how to act will be gratefully received by being addressed for Sarah MARTINSON to the care of T. PEMBERTON, Foreign Post Office or to R. CALLOW, 12 Archers Street, Haymarket. And Memorialist as in duty bound will ever pray.


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