STANLEY, John, 1820

National Archives, Kew, CO48/53, 300

Star Inn

Dale Street

Liverpool

1 January 1820

Sir,

Applying to Lieut. CHURCH on the subject of beds for persons going to the Cape under my direction, he refers me to the Secretary of State's officer.

As soldiers in transports are always found beds, I fully expected they would be found for my party, and as a matter of course came unprepared with them. My wife and self are provided but the settlers will want 20 beds & suitable blankets – as they are even on board quite destitute for themselves and children – the weather being severe they and their children feel the effects of it, and as it is not in my power to find them, having been at great expense for many months without being able to get a profit by my business, my capital is reduced at least one third since my offer to Government was made to proceed to the Cape. Requesting you will be good enough to grant the beds immediately

I am most respectfully Sir

Your obed't humble servant

John STANLEY

[Note from GOULBURN]

I forget what the arrangement was with respect to beds

[Answer from clerk, probably Richard PENN]

As most of the settlers were prepared to take beds with them only a limited supply was directed to be placed on board the transports

Order 8 Jan'y

 

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National Archives, Kew, CO48/53, 307

Liverpool

January 4th 1820

Sir,

I was honoured with your note of the 31st ult for which am obliged. The purport of the present is to hand you original duplicate and triplicate returns of settlers proceeding under my direction to the Cape of Good Hope.

As I before requested, the beds & blanquets required are very much wanted. You will readily admit that when the weather is as severe as to make the thermometer rest 14 degrees below the freezing point that it cannot be very comfortable for men, women and little children from 1 month to 6 years old to take up their abode every night on bare boards on board the John, now lying in the River Mersey. As to my finding them it is entirely out of the question. For want of them I have been obliged to take ASHBROOK's family ashore, as for want of proper bedding clothes and the proper necessaries one of his children is dying of a fever and two others of the measles. They are now ashore at my expense for lodging, medicines and the [means?] of food, what I certainly was totally unprepared for. I have no children of my own, yet it would appear I am liable to the maintenance of fifteen both in England and elsewhere, to which my funds are totally inadequate, for as I before observed what with the total absence of business and the support of my family for 6 months, since my offer in July my property is reduced full one third. I beg to be excused for being this candid and remain most respectfully, Sir

Your obedient humble servant

John STANLEY

NB The letter to Lord Charles SOMERSET is on board the John but shall be sent by tomorrow night's post.

[Note from GOULBURN]

Order a supply of blankets & bedding

[clerk] ordered 5th January

Return of Settlers proceeding to the Cape of Good Hope under the direction of John STANLEY, merchant of Manchester

Names of the Settlers

Age

Profession or Trade

Names of the Women

Age

Male Children

Age

Female Children

Age

John STANLEY

37

Merchant

Sarah

27

       

George ASHBROOK

27

Labourer

Catherine

24

George

2

Mary/Eliza

6/4

Solomon SHEPHERD

25

Labourer

Ann

25

Solomon

2

a girl*

 

James COWIE

28

Labourer

Elizabeth

28

   

Elizabeth/Jane

4/1½

John BROGDEN

22

Labourer

           

Thomas BOWKER

25

Labourer

           

Hugh MELLON

21

Labourer

           

James CALVERLEY

35

Labourer

Jane

28

William/James

13/5

Eliza

2

Abraham WILD

30

Labourer

Ann

29

Richard/Abraham/Henry

9/6/1

Betty/Maria

8/3

William PENDLEBURY

24

Labourer

           

Thomas CALVERLEY

18

Labourer

           

* a girl born since the return, six weeks old

Amount of money remitted to Wm. HILL Esq £122:10:0

Liverpool Jan 4th 1820

John STANLEY

 

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National Archives, Kew, CO48/53, 315

Liverpool

January 9th 1820

Sir,

When I had last the honour of writing you I promised to return you the letter (in my possession) to Lord Charles SOMERSET, but as Lieut. CHURCH advised me not to do so, as he every day expected to go to sea, I did not return it which I now regret, and as we certainly shall sail on Tuesday I am still in the same situation.

In consequence of one of the family's being unwell as before advised it was removed from on board the John to Liverpool and since one of the children had died of the putrid fever and 2 others are still ill of the measles. It has therefore been deemed expedient not to allow them to proceed to the Cape. The family's George ASHBROOK, Catherine and four children. This family had received considerable attention while in Manchester from Mrs. S. and myself and put me to many expenses whilst here without any lawful demand whatever, but I was a good deal surprised to hear that a memorandum of a very serious nature, at the instance of the said ASHBROOK, has been drawn up against me, which has given me great concern [obscured] as I am in possession of two memoranda signed by respectable witnesses which bear testimonies of a different complexion. I beg leave to transmit them herewith for the information of Earl BATHURST, and doubt not they will prevent the mischief intended, and as they cannot be in better hands than his Lordship's I request they may be deposited in his department. In case of need I beg to state that Mr. COLLINS is a Lieutenant in the Navy, Mr. R. BOWKER keeps the Star Inn on Dale Street and Mr. E. BOWKER is his brother. I will forbear saying anything further on this subject, as this man condemns himself, except to apologize for again giving you trouble.

The provisions of the ship John are excellent, the men cannot be better and as for Lieut. CHURCH he is everything I can wish for as to civility, ability and every other quality to make us comfortable and happy in our voyage to the Cape, which cannot fail to command the respect and support of every individual on board – and gratitude to the Government for its unlimited kindness and attention.

Sir, your obedient humble servant

John STANLEY

[enclosed]

I George ASHBROOK having been engaged to proceed with my family to the Cape of Good Hope under the direction of Mr. John STANLEY of Manchester, I proceeded on board ship in Liverpool with my family agreeably to his instructions and received the usual rations allowed by Government, but unfortunately some of the children were poorly and the surgeon of the ship ordered us ashore and accordingly we were put ashore and one of the children died. Now I have to observe that my family received great kindness prior to leaving Manchester & that during our residence on board ship and on shore in Liverpool I have had every reason to be satisfied with Mr. STANLEY's conduct towards myself & family and that he has in every instance fulfilled his agreement with me in an honourable manner and to my satisfaction.

Prior to setting off from Manchester he told me he could [bear?] us travelling expenses of any kind and that he could advance or pay for nothing untill we arrived in Algoa Bay, but in a voluntary way he has repeatedly advanced money to me in Liverpool, for which I had no claim whatever, and that in the presence of the first mate Mr. BARRINGTON of the ship John I as well as my wife repeatedly expressed that Mr. STANLEY has behaved to me and my family like a father, like a Lord, and as a satisfactory memorandum for his government I take the first opportunity of giving this document dated at Liverpool this sixth day of January 1820

George ASHBROOK

Signed in the presence of us

G. COLLINS

Rich'd BOWKER

Received from Mr. John STANLEY in Liverpool without any claim upon him whatever

Bed Quilt Value £0 18 0

Curtains 2 6

Money for releasing box at the barriers 2 0

Money for lodging on shore 3 0

Money for [?] 1 0

Money for medicines 2 6

Money for relanding family 2 6

Money to bury child 5 0

Total £1 16 6

Jan'y 7th 1820

Georhe ASHBROOK

Witness Edw.BOWKER

 

 

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National Archives, Kew, CO48/53, 326

Funchall

February 7th 1820

Sir,

I beg leave to inform you the John arrived here on the 2nd and the Stentor yesterday after a stormy and tedious passage during which Lt. CHURCH and the officers of the ship John have paid every attention to our health and comfort, indeed Lt. CHURCH is a man in ten thousand. His kindness and watchful attention to every person on board is beyond all praise & he has behaved like a father to us all, which if continued during the voyage must infallibly make our long voyage to the Cape a very pleasant one.

The Government has laid us under everlasting obligations in fitting out the ships in so superior a manner – every necessary provision is made that can be expected at sea and the people have ample provisions, grog &c that ever their hearts can wish for and a very great proportion are infinitely better provided for on board ship than they could possibly expect in their late home of old England.

As regards myself and party I return my sincere thanks, as the individuals going out with me will have an opportunity of doing well if they conduct themselves with moderation and propriety.

Staying here a few days cannot fail to be productive of great good, at all events it has proved so to Mrs. STANLEY & myself who have never before been more at sea than across the Mersey at Liverpool. With many thanks for past favours permit me the honour to be most respectfully, Sir

Your obedient humble servant

John STANLEY

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