GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

ANGIER, Joseph Paul

National Archives, Kew CO48/41, 104

Cork, Sept 10 1819

My Lord

Rumour prevailing much in this city concerning the intended Colony which is to go to Southern Affrica, being a young man in the prime of Life and commanding an unemployed capital of 500£ with yet further expectations I should feel pleased in going to any land under the protection of His Majesty's Goverment and where I should have bettering? prospects. If so noble a person as Earl BATHURST will through his secretary inform me of the particulars I shall take it as an honour confered upon your Lordship's most obedient and humble servant.

Joseph Paul ANGIER

Peter St. Hammonds Marsh, Cork

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/41, 114

Cork, Sept 21st 1819

My Lord,

I have intruded once more on you by directing your Lordship's attention to the following. As so noble a personage had me informed relative to the Cape of Good Hope shall your Lordship take further notice of so humble a person as he who addresses you, and give me permission to go, I shall return the deepest sense of gratitude when in a distant Land. I shall take with me 12 Agriculturalists and one Carpenter, most of whom if possible shall be single persons of integrity and industrious habits, several of them have already grasped at the sound because of Sore Poverty. If necessary I can obtain for your Lordship testimonials of character and of most respectable connexions in the County and City of Cork and instead of the lodgement required of 10£ for every family I shall if your Lordship pleases lodge 20£ for every family. My reason for wishing to go is twas nearest to no business but have an understanding in farming. With every respect I remain

Your Lordship's most obedient and humble servant

Joseph Paul ANGIER

Peter Street, Hammonds Marsh, Cork

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/41, 142

Cork, Oct 18th 1819

My Lord,

On a former occasion I intruded on your Lordship's notice praying your Lordship to give me permission to go to the Cape, agreeable to the circular letter which appeared in the publick papers, by the advice of several of my friends who were preparing, consisting of the first Gents and Merchants of this City and County, I prepared also when in the midst of expectation I was disappointed by their all resigning in consequence of a refusal of going to the place which they had at first in mind. This affair greatly distressed my mind. I have made bold for the last time of addressing your Lordship praying your Lordship to have me informed at what place the settlers will be located, for if I have sufficient time to prepare I should not feel in the least cast down at embarking with all my earthly substance for any Country where His Majesty's Government would be pleased to send me save that as now rumoured of being located in the Interior of the Continent of South Africa, 300 miles from the sea. I beg pardon for having troubled your Lordship on the present occasion. I have the honour to remain with every respect

Your Lordship's most obedient and humble servant

Joseph Paul ANGIER

Peter St, Cork

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