GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

BULL, Philip

National Archives, Kew CO48/41, 293

No.25 King Street

Surry Square

31st July 1819

Sir,

I have the honour to beg you may be pleased to furnish me with the circular making known particulars requisite for persons wishing to colonise to the Cape of Good Hope.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

Philip BULL

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/41, 297/298

No.25 King Street

Surry Square

2nd August 1819

Sir,

In conformity with the second clause of the circular letter detailing particulars under which persons will be permitted proceeding to the Cape of Good Hope, I beg leave most respectfully to solicit permission to proceed thither to settle under the direction of some person who may be applying for the number of individuals stated in the circular. I have a small capital at my disposition which altho' sufficient to establish myself is not for ten individuals. I therefore trust you may be pleased to grant my application, particularly as I am entitled to some small degree of favor having served His Majesty for a period of seven years on Foreign Service as a storekeeper in the Comm't Dep't, and being lately discharged on account of a reduction without any allowance further than a small gratuity I have to hope the same will be taken into your consideration. For a character I have to refer to Mr. Secretary HARRISON, Treasury Chambers, who I am persuaded will say everything possible to my advantage.

I am about 23 years of age and unmarried & in my youth was brought up a little to agriculture and farming therefore I should not proceed out an utter stranger to what it would be necessary for me to live by.

I have the honour to be your most obedient humble servant

Philip BULL

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