GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

CURRIE, Walter, 1820 Settler

National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 255

No. 8 Stockwell Street

Greenwich

29 August 1819

My Lord,

Wishing to emigrate to the Cape of Good Hope accompanyed by from 10 to 14 persons of the description undermentioned viz -

Lieut BISSET R. Navy his wife & three children

3 Carpenters

1 Blacksmith

1 Cooper

7 or 8 Ploughmen who are also qualified for agricultural services in general

If I succeed in engaging the men I have in view 2/8th of them are married with from 1 to 4 children each under 14 years - Parents ages from 20 to 38 years.

I beg your Lordship will be pleased to allow me to proceed with the persons of the aforesaid description& forward me for my guidance the Circular letters which have recently been issued as well as the memorandum relative to granting Land in that Colony

I have the honor to be My Lord

Your Lordships most H Servant

W. CURRIE

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 387

No. 8 Stockwell Street

Greenwich

5th Oct 1819

My Lord,

My name having been included in a list presented to your Lordship (for emigration to the Cape of Good Hope) by Mr. BISSETT, but which your Lordship did not deem it adviseable to accept, I have now to solicit your Lordship will be pleased to allow me a grant of land in that colony and I will proceed there at my own expence.

For pecuniary means i beg leave to assure your Lordship I can at any moment command more than £1300 and on this point or any other will court a reference to James POINGDESTRE Esq 55 Old Broad Street; I have likewise my half-pay as Purser in the Navy.

I do not solicit a large grant of land but will be perfectly satisfied with any quantity from 200 to [400?] acres across and with the above funds i trust your Lordship will be fully satisfied that I am competent to bring such a portion of land into the state of cultivation contemplated by Government, and under my establishment respectable.

I have the honor to be my Lord

Your Lordship's most obed't servant

W. CURRIE

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 467

No. 8 Stockwell St

Greenwich

27 Oct 1819

Sir,

In reference to your note of yesterday's date I beg to observe that on the offer to take a small party to the Cape of Good Hope being refused, I applied for a grant of land in that Colony to proceed at my own expence; a considerable time having elapsed without receiving an answer I concluded it

was not Earl BATHURST's intention to comply with my petition; and under this impression I on the 13th inst I agreed with Mr WILLSON on the promise of "having all advantages and a grant of land at the rate of 100 acres for myself and each able bodied men whom I should take out" and had accordingly engaged three men and paid Mr WILLSON as deposit for them and my own family £70 when on the 20th inst I received your letter of recommendation to Lord Charles Somerset.

Had I been aware of Earl Bathurst's intentions towards me I should decidedly have preferred going out independent, however having pledged myself to Mr WILLSON, paid my deposit, and engaged men whom I would not on any account disappoint, I must of course [obscured] with him, and therefore agreeable with your request return the recommendatory letter.

At the same time permit me to hope it will not be considered that my going out in this party shall be a [obscured] my procuring a grant of land in the Colony if I produce [obscured] that I possess funds equal to the cultivation of more than 400 acres promised me by Mr WILLSON.

I can at any moment command £1300 besides my pay in the Navy, and if these means are not greatly [obscured] for the due cultivation of 400 acres the new settlement will soon be in a deplorable state for I believe that I am very safe in asserting that taking leaders and [obscured]all round they do not possess half the sum for double the quantity of ground.

Could a short interview be granted me?

I have the honor to be Sir

Your most H Servant

W CURRIE

Print Email