GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

CAMPBELL, Charles, 1820 Settler

National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 177-180

No. 3 Durham Place

Lambeth

10th August 1819

My Lord,

Having seriously considered the disposition of embarking for The Cape of Good Hope, I have, as well as many others of respectability, hesitated in this determination only from the uncertain information of the intentions of His Majesty's Government as regards the protection the Settlers will receive from the hostile interruptions of the Natives.

Algoa Bay is too near that ferocious people the Kaffirs; a band of barbarians which can only be kept in awe by a superior military force. The Settlers must have their minds at ease with full confidence that their property is safe and free from the attacks of the Natives or else little good will be done.

Impressed with the truth of the above observations I am induced to submit a proposal for the consideration of the Executive Government and which I can with honor affirm is not suggested merely to advance my own personal interest, but while the measure is calculated so necessarily and materially to promote the general welfare of an infant Colony it will afford me the opportunity of pursuing my views in a character suitable to my Profession and to the rank I move in Society.

From the conviction that it will be indispensably necessary to guard against the hostility of the Natives as well as to afford support to the civil authorities as a time of emergency some local military force will be required, I have taken the liberty to prepare to raise a regiment of infantry for this special service under which Corps I solicit the honor to embark as Colonel with the military appointment of Commandant of the Settlement but without pay or emoluments of such appointment under the orders of the Commanders of the Forces and all official superiors at the Cape.

In the event of actual war I only look to be considered entitled to the usual advantages of others of my rank employed at the time. I presume to observe that some officer of Rank and experience [would] necessarily be stationed at the place intended for the establishment of the Settlers and I am fully persuaded I shall be enabled to complete a Regiment upon the terms proposed ready to embark in less than three months.

I have the honour to be, My Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant

Charles CAMPBELL

Major General

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 178

Proposal by Major General Charles CAMPBELL to raise a Regiment from amongst persons disposed to emigrate and from the Pensioners of the Army for this special service of the intended new Settlement at the Cape of Good Hope.

- The Corps to consist of 10 Companies each of 90 Privates with the usual Commissioned & Non Commissioned Officers &c.

- Ten men in each 100 to be Carpenters, Smiths, Masons, etc

(Remark: No addition of Pay)

- The men to be between the age of 18 and 45 and a material proportion to be engaged from the Pension list of the Army.

- The men to be inlisted for the term of seven years – certain land to be allotted & the men allowed one day in each week to cultivate - The wives and families as often as they please.

(Remark: It is calculated that one day in each week (or at that rate under the regulations of the office in command) with the continued aid and employment of their wives & families will cultivate as much land as will yield not only personal subsistence but will render parties tolerably independent at the termination of their respective service.)

-At the expiration of the term of service a certain number of men (in the proportion of the number sent from England to keep up the Establishment of the Corps) to be Discharged and an addition of land to what each party may have in cultivation to be granted in conformity to the original terms to Settlers

(Remark: Although it may not be deemed politic in the first instance to keep up the establishment of this Corps by Volunteers from persons liable to transportation for the minor offences, yet in a year or two it is humbly presumed that the small number about 100 yearly (& increased as may be judged proper) may safely be permitted to engage under certain conditions which measure would tend to ease in a considerable degree the heavy expense of more distant transportation.)

- In the event of foregoing necessity during Harvest and on other times, a certain proportion of the Corps may be employed to work for Settlers on which occasions sixpence is to be deducted from the daily pay of each man so permitted to work & to become a saving to the Public.

-The original Pensioners when discharged at the termination of service to be restored to their respective Pensions.

(Remark : This will assuredly encourage good behaviour holding out such prospect of becoming independent and providing for their families will ensure the most faithful discharge of duty and it is however proposed that their indulgence shall extend to those only who shall have conducted themselves meritoriously. Mutiny or Desertion shall render any one totally disqualified from favor )

- In order to the Corps being enabled to provide themselves with the usual necessaries an allowance will be required but only according to the following limits and scale viz.

  • For inlisting money – 1d
  • For Attesting – 1d
  • For Surgical Examination – 2d
  • For Printing attestations, stationary postage &c – 1d
  • For Levy money to be supplied for necessaries - £1.11d
  • TOTAL £ 1.17 each man

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 366

3 Durham Place

Lambeth

30 September 1819

Sir,

I have to request you will be pleased to submit my name to Earl BATHURST to be permitted to proceed with my family to the Cape of Good Hope engaging to carry out at least Ten individuals above 18 years of age under the same conditions as other Settlers.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

Chas. CAMPBELL

M Genl.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 398

3 Durham Place

Lambeth

7 October 1819

Sir,

I beg leave to ask if His Majesty's Government will consent to my proceeding with my family to the Cape of Good Hope taking with me from one to Thirty persons or families at my own Expense receiving an Allottment of land in the same proportion and under the dame conditions as will be granted to Settlers. The only aid I require from Government is the permission to carry out a moderate quantity of necessaries and Implements of husbandry.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

Chas CAMPBELL

M Genl.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 422

3 Durham Place

Lambeth

13 October 1819

Sir,

I request to know to what number of persons or families it is the desire of Earl BATHURST the party which I propose to take out to the Cape of Good Hope shall be limited.

It would be a convenience to me to extend the number to Fifty.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

Chas CAMPBELL

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 438

3 Durham Place

Lambeth

18th October 1819

Sir,

I had the honour to address you on the 13th inst requesting to know if Earl BATHURST had a desire to limit the number of persons or families which I have proposed to take to the Cape of Good Hope expressing my wish that the number first mentioned by me might be extended.

With the view to afford a number of respectable persons the opportunity of joining my party & by which the expenses of transportation and other arrangements would be very much reduced, I have earnestly to request Earl BATHURST's concurrence to my taking out with me a number not exceeding two hundred.

I have the honour to be

Your most obedient humble servant

Chas CAMPBELL

M Genl.

[Written by authorities on reverse side]

“What Genl CAMPBELL is this?”

Reply: He was upon the staff at Newfoundland and discontinued in the year 1816. Previous to his obtaining his present rank he was an inspecting field officer of a Recruiting District]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 460

3 Durham Place, Lambeth

25th October 1819

Sir,

Your letter of the 16th instant in answer to mine of the 13th leaving to myself to fix the number of persons I may take out to the Cape of Good Hope has induced me to make a very considerable selection; & I beg leave to ask if I have rightly understood that I have authority to carry out at my own expense whatever number may suit my own convenience.

I have the honour to be Sir your most obedient humble servant

Chas CAMPBELL

M Genl.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 482

3 Durham Place

Lambeth

3rd November 1819

Sir,

I had the honour of addressing you on the 25th ultimo to which I have not yet received any reply; and having made arrangements which have led me to a communication with Persons in the North of England and in Scotland I am at a loss how to proceed.

I have therefore to request I may be informed if Earl BATHURST has any objection to my engaging with a considerable number of persons to go along with myself or to proceed to join me at the intended settlement at the Cape of Good Hope at a convenient season if too late this winter & when actually arrived that I shall have a grant of lands according to the terms and conditions granted to settlers, it being understood that the transport of all shall be without expense to the Public.

I have the honour to be Sir your most obedient humble servant

Chas CAMPBELL

M Genl.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 497

10th November 1819

Sir,

May I be permitted to solicit an answer to my letters, the tendency of which was to be informed if your letter of the 16th ultimo conveyed an authority for me to take out to the Cape of Good Hope a party of settlers not exceeding two hundred or whether it is Earl BATHURST's desire that the party shall be more limited.

I have the honour to be Sir your most obedient humble servant

Chas CAMPBELL

M Genl.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 541

3 Durham Place

Lambeth

15th December 1819

Sir,

In consequence of the lateness of the year I find I shall not be able to embark for the Cape until the next proper season on which account I cannot furnish an accurate list of the persons whom I propose to take to the new settlement.

It being of consequence to me that I should be enabled to send some confidential servants to take charge of my effects intended for immediate embarkation, I beg to be permitted to name three or four persons for this purpose, to one of whom I may give directions for the selection of a spot for the erection of habitations &c and that he may be allowed to have possession of land on my behalf, in proportion with the number of persons I send out.

I have the honour to be Sir your most obedient humble servant

Chas CAMPBELL

M Genl.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 565

3 Durham Place

Lambeth

29th December 1819

Sir,

I enclose a nominal list of the men I propose to embark immediately for the new settlement at the Cape of Good Hope. The first named (Cypress MESSER) on the list is appointed by me to obtain in my name and on my behalf a portion of land in which to commence the erection of habitations and the cultivation of the land; and I have to request from Earl BATHURST his special authority to the Governor for this purpose.

I hope it will not be judged irregular that I should solicit a copy of the communication to be made to the Governor in order to my being the better to understand how to instruct the persons employed by me.

I have the honour to be Sir your most obedient humble servant

Chas CAMPBELL

M Genl.

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