GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

CLERK, Walter

National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 501

Glasgow

10th Nov 1819

My Lord,

From the judicious manner in which the Emigration to the Cape of Good Hope was disposed off in the Hon'ble the House of Commons I beg leave to enquire of your Lordship whether a sum not exceeding fifteen thousand pounds sterling may be placed at my disposal to engage a certain number of men &c to take possession of the liberal grant, as this cannot be effected without money given for that purpose. I humbly hope your Lordship will see the propriety of granting this request on a suitable scale compatable to the dignity of the British Empire. As thousands of men are almost destitute I make no doubt if your Lordship will be pleased to give me an order I would succeed in procuring men adequate to the Cultivation & in times of war would be a rampart to defend the Colony. Suppose a grant of Forty or Fifty Miles would be given me on a Lease of nine hundred years (free) and three thousand pounds more or less as might be adequate to procure & fetch the Emigrants, when one of His Majesty's Army could be employed to carry round the men from Greenock or any other place where I might order her – about twelve thousand pounds could be advanced as occasion would require at the Cape, on security over there by way of mortgage, as this scheme would succeed I make no doubt but in the course of ten years that I would be able to repay it back by produce and otherwise. From my own observations when in America & the West Indies I flatter that your Lordship would not be disappointed & from my local knowledge of N. Britain & part of Ireland that men of good moral character would embark on liberal terms, from the lamentable state of trade, every encouragement should be adopted for the good of the Empire.

I have the honour to be my Lord

Your Lordship's most obed't humble sevt

Walter CLERK

PS Please address for me to the care of Messrs FERGUSON & STEWART, Glasgow

I might have given a more full account but as I did not deem it necessary from your own knowledge of the Colonies

[across bottom, possibly in a different hand?]

If £20,000 thousand pounds was realized this country would have been more satisfied

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