GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

COLLIER, William

National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 32

6 Coppice Row

Clerkenwell

July 20th 1819

Sir,

Having read in the papers the plan offered by Government for emigrating to the Cape of Good Hope & having a desire to go there but am quite unacquainted where to apply for the department I think would suit me, is the reason I have taken the liberty to write to you & by informing you what I am you may perhaps inform me (if you think me a proper person to go out with a number as proposed in the letter) where to apply – I have been brought up in the medical profession & have been in practise the last 6 years but not having it in my power to make that [assurance?] medical men are expected to make owing to a want of money, I have not been able to succeed. Now it occurs to me that any one with a knowledge of medicine would be desirable to go out with the care of a number of emigrants and of course in all countries medical assistance would be required. I am very well aware that whoever [does] intend going must not expect to lead an idle life, but by industry and perseverance I have no doubt but they will meet with success.

I am Sir your most obedient humble servant

Wm. COLLIER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 58

6 Coppice Row

Clerkenwell

July 25th 1819

Sir,

I hope the desire of gaining every information before I enter into so serious a business viz. the care of families wishing to emigrate to the Cape of Good Hope will be a sufficient excuse for again intruding upon you. For the information I wish to know I must suppose I have a number of families willing to emigrate and they are approved of by Government, in what light am I to consider those families, are they to be my servants, bound in some way to serve me for a certain length of time; otherwise upon any trivial dispute they will be at liberty to leave me & seek some other employer. And in case of death of one or more of the men I take out, am I to provide for his widow and children if he should chance to have either. In the latter part of your letter it says that at the expiration of three years the land shall be measured and one hundred acres allowed for every family. Should any of the men die or leave me before the expiration of the three years, or if the whole number I take out have been employed on the estate and any leaving by death or otherways become removed before the expiration of the three years, am I only to receive the portion of land for those then residing on the estate? The above particulars I consider to be requisite to be thoroughly acquainted with, that I may not plead ignorance if those rights should ever be called in question.

I am Sir your most obedient humble servant

Wm. COLLIER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 138

6 Coppice Row

Clerkenwell

Aug 3 1819

Sir,

I beg leave to inform you I have a number of families willing to emigrate to the Cape of Good Hope under my care, most of them are married, about one third are mechanics, all of them have been used to agriculture & the eldest does not exceed thirty four years of age. [All] in good health. I wish to be certain that they will be accepted by Government otherwise they may neglect seeking employment for the winter & also [be] disappointed going to the Cape which would much distress them. Therefore in order to ensure their passage I shall be happy to hear when it may be convenient to Government to receive the deposit & also see the different families if thought necessary.

I am Sir your most humble servant

Wm. COLLIER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 235

6 Coppice Row

Clerkenwell

21st Aug 1819

Sir,

The following are the families willing to emigrate to the Cape of Good Hope under my directions. I have been in the habit of attending those families occasionally in my professional capacity for the last ten years therefore I can declare them to be in good health & bear a very good character for industry & honesty.

I am Sir your obt hmb svt

Wm. COLLIER

Names Family

Daniel PRITCHARD no wife none

Richard CROMARK wife one child

Daniel ALDER no wife none

Thos. CRIPPS wife one child

John JUDE wife two children

John BROWN - -

James CROWTHER wife one child

Thos. KEMP wife one child

John WOODING wife two children

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 237

14 Great Russell St

Bloomsbury

1 Sep 1819

I do hereby declare that I am ready to conform to all the conditions upon which His Majesty's Government have offered to grant lands in the Cape of Good Hope.

Wm. COLLIER

Name and Description of the Person taking out the Settlers

Wm. COLLIER

Aged 30

Surgeon practising in the three branches of the profession

Sarah my wife

Aged 29

Wm my son 7

Sarah 5

Thos. 3

Names of Settlers

Profession or Trade

Age

Wife

Age

Male Children

Ages

Female Children

Ages

Daniel PRITCHARD

Plowman

20

           

Daniel ADER

Carpenter

29

   

One

11

   

Richard CROMACK

Farmer

27

           

William PEACH

Labourer

29

Lucy

27

One

7

One

3

John JUDD

Labourer

30

           

Thos. CRIPPS

Baker

26

           

Joseph WATSON

Plowman

24

           

Richard DAVIS

Milkman

25

           

James CROWTHER

Labourer

30

Ann

33

One

3

One

6

Justin HUDSON

Plowman

31

       

One

5

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 295

14 Great Russell St

Bloomsbury

Sep 10 1819

Sir,

In consequence of the house I live in being under repair I am obliged to leave it, therefore when the decision is given respecting my proposal to the Cape of Good Hope you will very much oblige me by directing for me by letter at Wellings's Newspaper Office, 14 Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury instead of Coppice Row, Clerkenwell

I am Sir your obdt sevt

William COLLIER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 356

Wellings's Newspaper Office

14 Great Russell Street

Bloomsbury

20 September 1819

Sir,

A month ago I sent my proposal to emigrate to the Cape of Good Hope & have waited with anxiety to know the result, both on my own part & also those families who intend going under my direction if my proposal is accepted. The time is now drawing near when it is intended for those accepted to sail – as induced once again to trouble you to inquire if there was any thin more required than in my proposal, or whether the letter I sent you since I sent the proposal, stating that I had left my house in Coppice Row, had been overlooked. I shall feel very much obliged by hearing from you that I may be able to give the persons I proposed some satisfactory information, for at present I assure you they are very unsettled and are very anxious to hear of some decision.

I am Sir yr obt svt

Wm. COLLIER

[written across the bottom: upon the whole this had better be rejected]

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