GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

COLLING, Thomas, 1820 Settler

National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 14

166 Wapping

July 17, 1819

My Lord,

On reading in the public prints that it was in the contemplation of Government to send out settlers to the Cape, and being informed from Mr VANSITTART that all application on the subject, should be made to your office, I take the liberty to offer myself to your Lordships notice. I have for some time felt an inclination to reside in some British settlement, not because I am disaffected to the Government, and therefore wish to emigrate, quite the reverse. I was born of loyal parents, and am myself loyal from principle, but I have a large and rising family of industrious and persevering habits, and mechanical genius, one of which is bringing up as a civil engineer, and others to different useful employments, my self 48 years of age, my present wife 36 and eleven children from 26 to one year, six of whome I should take with me. My employment has been principally as a builder and timber dealer, of which I possess a competent knowledge, also of surveying in its different branches, and mercantile concerns generally, and not altogether ignorant of the police of my country and the laws by which we are happily governed. I have some little property, and can procure satisfactory recommendations from very respectable persons, for any confidence you may be pleased to repose in me. I will also pledge myself that whatever talents I possess, and any knowledge I may have acquired, most chearfully to employ for the good of others and the prosperity of my Country.

Permit me to subscribe myself your Lordships most obedient humble servant

Thomas COLLING

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 44

166 Wapping

July 22, 1819

Sir,

I received yours of the 20th and feel much obliged for the very prompt reply you have been pleased to favour me with. I wish at the same time to inform you that I am willing on my part to engage in the conditions required, and increase the amount of deposit if necessary, and also take out a variety of useful articles of some value. If his Majesty's Government should consider me an eligable person, I will enter into any engagement that I am able to perform, your answer will be esteemed a favour, and for my government I shall feel much obliged by an answer to the following questions; first, on landing will temporary lodgings be provided, second, at what distance from the capital shall we be placed, third, will a single man have the same allotment of land as a person with five or six children, fourth, how are implements of husbandary, stock and seeds &c to be obtained, fifth, what weight, or tonage will each company be allowed to take out with them.

I remain with the greatest respect your most obedient humble servant

Thomas COLLING

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 136

166 Wapping

Augst. 3, 1819

Sir,

I hope you will excuse the liberty I have taken in again adressing you on the subject of a settler at the Cape, or such part as his Majesty's Government shall direct, but feeling some doubt respecting my former application, lest it was not sufficiently explicit, I beg leave to state, that should my offer be accepted by their Lordships, that it is my intention to conform to the instructions given by Government, as to the number of persons, and the deposits required, I can also procure letters of recommendation from gentlemen of approved loyalty, and respectability, and the persons I propose to accompany me, are sober, industrious, and loyal, and some of them practical farmers.

I shall feel much obliged by the earliest information in order to provide a variety of useful articles, as I intend to lay out from 500 to 1000£ for my own family if I can obtain permission from Government for their conveyance.

I beg to remain with great respect your most obedient humble servant

Thomas COLLING

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 167

166 Wapping

Augst. 7th 1819

Sir,

I received yours of the 5th instant in reply to which I beg leave to state, that I should not have presumed to have applied for more then my own family, but in consequence of the regulations of Government with which you have been pleased to favour me, I propose to take out, of my own family, my wife, one son 23, one do. 17, one daughter 15 and 3 children younger.

A man, his wife and five children from 2 years to 13 years

A man, wife and one child

Two young men and wives and three or four single men

Total ten men, six women and ten children, but this arrangement shall be subject to any revision or alteration you may be pleased to dictate, as I can very readily increase the number, if it is their Lordships pleasure I should do so, and every means shall be used to select such persons as are sober, industrious, and attached to our Government, but if their Lordships should be pleased to make any selection of persons themselves, and add to our company, I would undertake any superintendance under their Lordships direction or render any assistance in my power to further the views of Government, but it would be imprudent in me to insinuate that I posess any particular qualifications for such appointment, or am deserving of such confidence, but I posess some of the spirit of an Englishman and am desirous of being usefull. I will only add that I have been twenty years a [obscured] man of the City of London, and have [obscured] assisted as far as my influence would [obscured] such members as was favourable to our Government. I have also served Parish offices, and have repeatedly served on the Grand Jury for the County of Middlesex. I am still willing to do any thing in my power, their[sic] is one small circumstance I should name altho it is foreign to the present business, when the exchange of our silver currency took place, my house was one that was selected for that district, and we had the honour of given general satisfaction to the gentlemen of that department, and it is our ambition to give satisfaction to those under whome we act, we hope at no very distant period to be able to give some evidence to their Lordships, that their confidence has not been misplaced, and if possible to convey something to posterity allow me to add wherever my lot be cast the very unexpected attention I have received from you will be ever remembered with gratitude and acknowledged with pleasure

I remain with great respect your obedient humble servant

Thomas COLLING

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 267

166 Wapping

Sept. 1st 1819

Name and Description of Persons taking out the Settlers :

Thomas COLLING, Builder Architectural and Land Surveyor, Aged 48 Years

Elizabeth COLLING 36

William 17, Joseph 4, Ann 15, Elizabeth 3, Charlotte 8 mo

Name of Settler

Profession or Trade

Age

Women

Age

Male Children

Ages

Female Children

Ages

John COLLING

Boat Builder

23

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thos.COLLING

Carpenter

21

 

 

 

 

 

 

Samuel EVANS

Brush maker & bristle dealer

27

Sarah

22

 

 

Sarah

6mo

George LANE

Farmer

48

Ann

46

John

8

Mary/Susan/

Sarah/Martha

14/12/10/3

John RANDALL

Apothecary & Man Midwife

22

 

 

 

 

 

 

James FARR

Cooper

37

 

 

 

 

 

 

John A. WITTENAM

Farmer

45

Mary

48

 

 

 

 

Cornelius ROCK

Shoemaker

27

 

 

 

 

 

 

George BURDEN

Farmer

32

Susanna

34

George

3

Susan/Mary

4/2

I am willing to conform to all the conditions upon which his Majesty's Government have offered to grant lands in the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope.

Thomas COLLING

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/42, 454

166 Wapping Street

October 21, 1819

My Lord,

I had united myself with one hundred persons and families under the superintendance of Mr Edward WYNNE for the purpose of proceeding as settlers to such part of South Africa, as his Majesty's Government should direct, and expected to have proceeded under such superintendance, but from some unforeseen circumstance he is for the present prevented from going. Mr W.

has therefore selected myself from his company, and the proposed settlers have approved of the nomination to take his place.

I therefore humbly submit myself for your Lordship's approbation, at the same time engaging to conform to and submit, to all orders, rules and regulations, required by his Majesty's Government, in all things conducting myself as a good subject, and using every exertion to promote the comfort

and prosperity of the persons with whom I am connected, and in everything fulfilling the engagements of the said Mr Edward WYNN.

I remain your Lordships most Obedient humble servant

Thomas COLLING

[Note from The Settler Handbook: Thomas COLLING, a former head of SEPHTON's Party, was unable to embark in the Brilliant, but sailed in the Sir George Osborn as an independent settler attached to GARDNER's Party.]

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