GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

EARLE, William (1)

[NB that this is not the 1820 settler William John EARLE of WILLSON's Party, whose father was John EARLE of Winchester]

National Archives, Kew CO48/43, 62

Cromwell Cottage

Old Brompton

Aug 31st 1819

Sir,

I have done myself the honor of addressing a letter to the Right Honorable the Earl BATHURST tendering my proposals for 20 settlers at the Cape of Good Hope whereon I have freely detailed the terms I have made with the unfortunate individuals who seek that colony in the hopes of ameliorating their condition. I trust that I shall found to have made terms honourable to myself and to the Government which has wisely determined upon a measure promising the most extensive advantages as well to the colonists as the mother country. While I do myself the honor of addressing these few lines to you in furtherance of my design I am principally induced to press upon your attention the very serious importance of coming to an early decision that the parties who have made proposals may be in a situation to terminate the hopes or fears of the many destitute individuals crowding their lists.

There are many capitalists who assured of their proposals being accepted could and would have no objection in doing something to alleviate the present misery of them who are wholly without employment and who are buoyed with the hopes of emigration. It is painful to witness the anxiety of these wretched men, it is distressing their earnest importunities for relief. With regard to my own settlers, I shall be happy to do whatever is necessary consistent with [guidance] if I can learn from you that my proposals can and will be accepted. I also know not whether it is necessary in the first instance to send the deposit which is ready at any moment when I know how and where it is to be paid. Could I be made acquainted with these particulars through your medium, I shall feel it a great mark or your condescension and favour.

And have the honor to subscribe myself sir

Your most obed and obliged Hble servant

Wm EARLE Jnr.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/43, 64

Cromwell Cottage

Old Brompton

Sept 5th 1819

My Lord,

Conformable to the government circular issued under your directions, I take the liberty of transmitting to you the enclosed volunteering to locate with me at my expense at the proposed settlement at the colony of the Cape of Good Hope.

While I can safely calculate upon the industry of these people I may confidently introduce them to your Lordship's notice as persons fully deserving of protection inasmuch as their necessities cannot be exceeded and that those necessities are solely the result of the pressure of the times. A pressure produced alone by the unlimited use of mechanical inventions superseding manual labor.

Unwilling to have my name associated with those adventurers who are now making contracts with the unfortunate at once arbitrary oppressive and contrary to the views and intentions of the government. I beg leave to lay before you the substance of my agreement with these individuals as the best security I can afford for the fulfilment of the government's wishes in the establishment of a peaceable and happy colony.

First. I propose to well and sufficiently cloath them previous to embarkation.

Secondly. To victual them from the period of their landing and to provide them with every necessary for a period of three years.

Thirdly. To provide them with tents until such time that cottages can be erected for their accommodation.

Fourthly. To apportion off to each of them a piece of land in proportion to the extent of their families which they are to cultivate to their own exclusive profit after having devoted 8 hours in each day to my service.

Fifthly. At the expiration of three years when their service expires to assign to them a proportion of the 100 acres with a cottage &c &c

By these means I hope to make a comfortable and a happy peasantry of those persons who seek the colony as a remedy to the evils resulting from an overgrown population at home and I think I may confidently predict that loyalty and affection for the mother country and its government will be the result of my efforts. A stake in the ground is the rallying post of loyalty, and I feel convinced that it becomes important in the government to resist the application of capitalists settling at the Cape who will not subscribe to some such regulation in order to the encouragement of industry and to the accomplishment of consequent independance.

Upon these terms, My Lord, I solicit the priviledge of taking out 20 families to the Cape and I earnestly request that I may learn from your Lordship the very earliest opportunity whether my proposals are acceded to or not. In charity I ask it to the forlorn individuals who seek this step as their only refuge from calamities which already overwhelm them.

The lateness of the period of sending in this proposal I also feel bound to explain. It arises from having connected myself in this pursuit with Ensign John GORDON on the retired list 2nd R.V.B. who sent in his tender for 100 families on the 7th day of August. I also think it is right to state in explanation of myself that I have the honor of being known to the Rt Hon the Earl of YARMOUTH, that the Rt Hon the Lord Viscount CASTLEREAGH knows my family being the son of Mr W. EARLE of Albemarle Street, bookseller.

I have the honor to be your Lordship's most obed servant

W. EARLE Jun.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/43, 66

A Return of the Heads of Familes with their description, age, profession &c who have volunteered to emigrate to the Cape of Good Hope subject to the government conditions under the direction and in the service of Mr William EARLE Cromwell Cottage Old Brompton County of Middlesex

From William EARLE Jun

No

Name

Age

Wife's Age

Children

Ages

Total

Profession

1

Robert BREAD

35

 

 

 

1

Laborer

2

Thomas TIMPSON

22

22

1

7mo

3

Farmer

3

William ROWLEY

33

 

 

 

1

Carpenter

4

John RICE

37

 

 

 

1

Laborer

5

David MURRAY

34

32

2

8/4

3

Blacksmith

6

James DALLAWAY

33

 

 

 

1

Laborer

7

Thomas WRIGHT

35

33

1

6

3

Blacksmith

8

Alexander MANSON

34

 

 

 

1

Farmer

9

Micahel McCARTHY

24

 

 

 

1

Shoemaker

10

Richard ORMSBY

23

 

 

 

1

Laborer

11

D. HURLEY

35

30

2

8/6

4

Stone mason

12

William CONOLLY

30

36

 

 

2

Laborer

13

Denis KELLY

26

 

 

 

1

Laborer

14

John HALL

31

 

 

 

1

Sawyer

15

Charles LEACH

39

 

 

 

1

Laborer

16

John CROMWELL

25

 

 

 

1

Laborer

17

Peter HILLYER

32

34

3

2/3/5

5

Farmer

18

William BUTTON

23

17

1

6mo

3

Laborer

19

Thomas DONAVON

30

34

 

 

2

Laborer

20

Thomas RENTIN

25

29

2

2/6

4

Bricklayer

 

TOTAL

20

9

12

 

41

 

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