GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

FORD, James Edward, 1820 Settler

National Archives, Kew CO48/43, 113

Brooksby's Walk

Homerton

16th July 1819

Sir

I take the liberty of addressing you to request the necessary information respecting the intentions of Government in favour of Emigrants to the Cape of Good Hope.

I am not aware whether it be necessary in this first application to state my circumstances & reasons for wishing to avail myself of this intention, but it may not be deemed premature to say this much – that in consequence of the total failure of the business in which I have from some time been engaged and the pressure of a large family of seven children whom I can no longer support here, altho' I have made every effort for that purpose, I am at length compelled either to depend for support on the assistance of others or to seek independence by the method now offered.

If my present mode of application is incorrect, I trust I shall be favor'd with instructions in what manner to repeat it in order to obtain the earliest information.

I have the honor to remain, Sir, your most obedient servant

J E FORD

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/43, 148

Brooksby's Walk

Homerton

29th July 1819

Sir,

I have been favored with your circular of the inst respecting the intended settlement at the Cape of Good Hope and I beg leave to say that I have no doubt of being able to comply with the terms therein stated as far as regards the number and description of the persons to be taken out, to entitle me to the proposed grant of 1,000 acres.

In addition to the sums required to be deposited for each individual or family I think I may safely calculate on being able to raise a further capital of from £400 to £500 which I trust will be considered sufficient to render my proposal eligible.

I hope it will not be considered intrusive or premature my submitting inclosed a few queries which naturally suggest themselves & to which I beg the favor of your reply, not for my own satisfaction alone but to enable me to inform those with whom I am now in treaty to accompany me, in the event of my proposals being accepted.

May I also add that, if necessary, I can produce the most undoubted testimonials of the respectability of my character and a strong recommendation to W. ELLIS, Colonial Secretary at the Cape.

Should there be any part of my proposals not sufficiently explanatory or not exactly agreeing with the intentions of Government it may be in my power on being acquainted therewith to add to them what will be necessary to render them eligible.

I have the honor to remain, Sir

Your most obedient servant

J.E. FORD

Print Email