GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

LEE, William (2)

National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 245

No. 9 Brighton Street

Cromer Street

Brunswick Square

London

July 19th 1819

Sir

Having at the close of last week addressed a letter to Lord SIDMOUTH for information and particulars respecting Emigration to the Cape of Good Hope, and to which I have this morning received an answer, (signed H. HOBHOUSE) refering me to the Colonial Department for such particulars, I take the liberty of addressing you on the subject, agreeably to such reference, and to state the particulars of my situation and circumstances:-

I am a single man, about 25 years of age; was born in New Malton in the county of York, and regularly brought up as a Printer, Bookseller and Binder, have worked in London both as a Printer and Bookbinder, and was deprived of my last situation by the calamitous fire which destroyed the extensive premises of Messrs BENSLEY and Son, Printers, Bolt Court, Fleet Street; since which accident I have been unceasing in my endeavours to procure other employment; the general depression of the above business, however, renders my utmost efforts fruitless. Having been only 8 weeks in my last situation, (previous to which I had been out of employment some weeks) of course my savings would be little - that little is now consumed, and I am at present living on the industry of a brother, without the least prospect of meeting with employment to relieve my necessities.

Thus, Sir, circumstanced as above, I humbly and respectfully beg to be sent out to the Cape of Good Hope, with no other object in view, than that of earning by my industry an honest livelihood. I am more anxious and earnest to quit the business before mentioned, as the great redundancy of workmen (added to the art of stereotype printing) has made it difficult to meet with employment more than 6 months out of 12.

Perhaps, Sir, it may not be amiss further to add, that I have duly and deliberately considered the subject of Emigration, considered that the undertaking is hazardous, - fertile with toil and hardship, and requiring fortitude of mind as well as perseverance of bodily strength and a sound constitution.

I further beg, Sir, to include myself on your notice: should there be occasion to employ any Clerks, either at the time of going out or when arrived at the Settlement, I should feel highly honoured and greatly obliged by your kind endeavours to place me in such a situation, however trifling. I can give the most respectable reference as to sobriety, and general Character, if requisite.

I have the honour to be, Sir,

Your most humble and obedient servant

William LEE

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 257

No. 9 Brighton Street

Cromer Street

Brunswick Sq

July 23rd 1819

Sir

I take the liberty of soliciting an answer to my letter of Monday last stating the particulars of encouragement to be given to persons in my situation also when the transports will be likely to sail. In requesting the above, I do not expect any likelihood of working at my profession. In apologising for this intrusion, I have to say it is owing to having no employment which makes me anxious to come to some determination as I cannot remain much longer in London under such circumstances.

I have the honour to be, Sir,

Your humble serv't

William LEE

If not convenient to give me an answer at present perhaps I could be informed when I may expect one.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 295

London

Aug 2nd 1819

Sir

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the official circular which you were pleased to favor me with on the 24th July, regarding Emigration to the Cape of Good Hope; and, on finding the information therein contained to relate almost exclusively to those persons who have capital, I again presume to address you on the subject, so far as relates to distressed and unemployed mechanics.

I wish, first, to be informed if the applicant deposited for by the Capitalist is to be considered as a servant to the depositor; and if so, for what term of years, and on what conditions: - also, if such agreement (if any) is to be ratified in England; and if the applicant will be allowed to choose his employer, or vice versa.

Secondly - in the event of any emigrant acquiring by industry in service as above the means and knowledge of cultivating land on his own account, will the Government make a similar, liberal grant of land to him, as it purposes doing to the Capitalists at present making deposits.

Thirdly - will no other encouragement be given to mechanics, than classing them as servants, as above queried.

On an approval of the answer to be returned to the above, I wish to be informed what steps will be further requisite to secure a passage out; and if a personal application or examination will be required.

I have the honour to remain, Sir,

Your most obedient servant

William LEE

At Mr BASSHAM'S

45 Upper North Place

Gray's Inn Road

Late at No. 9 Brighton Street

Cromer Street

Brunswick Square

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