GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

ONNSLEY, James

National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 955

48 Skinner Street

Snow Hill

9th August 1819

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose you the Outline of a Plan that I take the liberty of requesting you will submit to the consideration of the Earl of BATHURST. If it should meet his Lordship's approbation and that I can obtain the permission of His Royal Highness the Commander in Chief I am ready to undertake the Completion which I have no doubt I can do within three months.

I have served his Majesty 26 years, I am upwards of two years a Lieut. Colonel in the Army. I was for many years in employment under the Irish Government and honor'd by their unlimitted confidences for which I beg leave to refer to the Right Hon'ble Robert PEEL, and in the event of my plan being approved of I am ready to go out as Colonel Commandant or if any other person should be thought more elligible for that situation I leave it to his Lordship to reward me in such manner he may think my exertions deserving of, and the only requirement necessary to carry on the business will be a small advance of money to pay the attendant expences.

The place I would prefer putting this plan into execution would be chiefly in the north of Ireland, where I am well known to the inhabitants and I know them to be a very enterprising people.

I shall only add that if honor'd by the appointment I have suggested my best endeavours shall be devoted to fulfil the wishes of His Majesty's Government and promote the interest of those who emigrate to that country.

I have the honor to be Sir your very obed't serv't

James ONNSLEY

Lieut. Colonel

Regulations under which it is proposed to procure a number of persons to emigrate from either England or Ireland to the Cape of Good Hope under the plan laid down by Government formed before the idea that an occasional Military Force may be requisite towards the Permanent Establishment of a Civil Government, particularly in the neighbourhood of Algoa Bay.

1st that Officers from the Half Pay of the Army, those that have served in the Militia or Yeomanry Corps, are complete masters of Military Discipline and of Exemplary Conduct in their Civil Capacities, shall be chosen for this purpose and equal care to be taken in the selection of the non commissioned officers and privates who are to consist of more that have been trained to arms in the line, Militia or Volunteer Corps, and well acquainted with the cultivation of ground.

2ndly that a considerable number of the latter should be carpenters, masons, taylors, shoemakers and such other tradesmen as may be necessary to form a new settlement and that they be permitted to take working tools along with them. A few men accustomed to work in collieries can be readily obtained and the whole to form a Militia Corps for the General Service of the country whenever call'd upon to act upon any emergency Without Pay and under Forfeiture of the Land allotted to them in case they do not serve or find a substitute when required to do so.

3rdly each individual to deposit the sum required by Government Regulations into the hands of the Collector of the District in which he resides and to receive from him an assurance that Govt. will send them out at a stated period, naming the port at which they will be embark'd.

4thly that each individual shall enter into an engagement to give 90 days Work or Labour in the first year towards the Erection of Public Works or such other buildings as may be requisite.

5thly that arms, accoutrements & clothing shall be provided by Government under the same Regulations as the Yeomanry Corps have been supplied, and to be newly clothed every other year.

Scale by which the emigrants are proposed to be remunerated according to their respective stations.

   

Total

1 Colonel Commandant

4000 acres

4,000

2 Lieut. Colonels

2000 each

4,000

2 Majors

1000 each

2,000

10 captains

600 each

,6000

1 Surgeon

600

600

2 Assistant Surgeons

300 each

600

10 Lieutenants

300 each

3,000

10 Ensigns

300 each

3,000

1 Adjutant

300

300

1 Quarter Master

300

300

1 Sergt. Major

200

200

1 Qr Master Sergeant

200

200

50 Sergeants

100 each

5,000

1000 Rank & File

80 each

80,000

1092 individuals convey'd at 100 acres each being the quantity allow'd by Govt.

 

109,200

Note from GOULBURN across bottom of letter:

Return him thanks for his communication but acquaint him that the Govt. having laid down a plan upon which alone encouragement is to be given to persons emigrating the Cape, Lord B does not feel himself at liberty to deviate from or extend the arrangement. At the same time Ld B would observe that much of what he has in view may be attained even under the existing regulations should he determine on making an offer consistent with the terms presented in the printed letter.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 953

48 Skinner Street

Snow Hill

16th August 1819

Sir,

I have been honor'd by your letter of the 12th inst in reply to which I beg leave to state that unconnected with the military part of my proposal I could not flatter myself my exertions or influences would be attended with success. I must therefore rest satisfied with the hope that in the event of His Majesty's Ministers making any alterations in their plans to make my proposal acceptable at a future day, that the Earl of BATHURST will be pleased to consider me at all times ready to promote the wishes or interests of the Government of this country.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your very obed't serv't

James ONNSLEY

Lieut. Colonel

 

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