GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

ROWLES, Thomas, 1820 Settler

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 492

Stroud, Gloucestershire

30th July 1819

Right Hon'd Sir,

Inspired with a hope at the appearance of the grant which Government have made to encourage emigration to the Cape my present object is to ascertain instructions how to obtain their protection.

Possessed of a mind elevated I trust a little above that of a common mendicant, my chief and indeed my only motive for leaving my native country is to obtain means to provide by honesty and industry for a wife and family of seven, which I find totally impracticable here. To enter into particulars relative to my circumstances in life I suppose is not necessary on this occasion. The employment I am desirous of at the Cape is the cultivation of land and as opportunity serves the instruction of the youth surrounding my abode.

Let me intreat you Rt Hon Sir to give my case your serious consideration. We are all young and in good health, able and willing to work. A refusal to our petition will come as a thunderbolt. It must [obscured] be received by us under our present gloomy circumstances as a warrant to suffer martyrdom by starvation and that too in a land teeming with abundance. Nothing is more repugnant to my feelings than the idea of alms and parish charity. Any privations rather than undergo the thought. To an external observer there may appear to be no prospect of anything of the kind. It is true we are at present in some degree of respectability but could you, Rt. Hon. Sir, know our real circumstances I am confident the feelings of your own heart would not fail to produce an effect on your influence in our behalf. Thankful that under the British constitution such influence may and is exerted in behalf of those whose humble lot is cast amongst the distresses of human life, such is your petitioner who, impressed with a conviction that you will not overlook him, begs with all deference and submission to remain, Rt.Hon. Sir

Your very obedient and humble anxious servant

Thomas ROWLES

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 561

22 Weymouth Terrace

Hackney Road

Or Stroud, Gloucestershire

25th August 1819

Sir,

Agreeably to your instructions I beg to transmit you the Return of the Persons I wish to take out as Settlers, hoping it will be accepted. Waiting your pleasure and further directions I beg to remain Sir

Your most obed't humble servant

Thomas ROWLES

Return of Persons intended to be taken out as Settlers to the Cape of Good Hope

Name

Age

Country

Description

Family

Children under 14

Thomas ROWLES

32

England

Traveller Clerk, Surveyor &c

Wife & 6

5 boys 1 girl

Isaac WIGGALL

30

Do.

Carpenter

Wife & 4

3 boys 1 girl

Simon GARDNER

24

Do.

Millwright

Wife & 1

I boy

William LAWFULL

30

Do.

Sawyer

Wife & 3

3 boys

Jno. CRANE

22

Do.

Carpenter

Single

 

Henry LANGAN

34

Do.

Wheelwright

Wife & 4

3 boys 1 girl

Jno. CHIPPERFIELD

20

Do.

Labourer

Single

 

Frederick HAWKES

21

Do.

Mason

Do.

 

Wm. SCARLETT

22

Do.

Cabinet Maker

Do.

 

Jno. PHIPPS

25

Do.

Labourer

Wife & 1

I boy

Edward THOMPSON

30

Do.

Shoemaker

Wife & 3

1 boy 2 girls

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 612

Hackney

5th Oct 1819

Sir,

As I deemed it necessary to meet my Party previous to sending in the lists agreeably to your instructions I could not conveniently make my return sooner.

You will perceive, Sir, on examination, some deviation from the former list, which I have been compelled to make on account of some of the individuals withdrawing from their agreement, in consequence of listening to the false rumours which are so industriously circulated by the enemies to all good and laudable efforts. The consequence I trust will not be material as their places are supplied by promising young men of good character.

I have take the liberty to enclose a few questions hoping you will not take it as an intrusion, which if convenient should be happy to receive with your next communication. Waiting your pleasure I remain Sir

Your very obed't humble & obliged servant

Thomas ROWLES

[attached]

Sir,

If you think it is not too much trouble you will very much oblige me by resolving the following questions, which are humbly submitted to you solely for the satisfaction of the party under my direction. I am Sir

Your very obed't & obliged servant

Thomas ROWLES

As my party will be equally interested in regard to distribution of the land, profits &c will it be necessary that an agreement to that effect made in England previous to embarkation should be subject to stamp duty?

Must such agreement or a copy thereof be left in the care of Government?

On our arrival at the Cape will the deposit be repaid in sterling?

If any individual dies on his passage will his deposit be forfeited?

Should any of the unmarried of my party contract matrimony previous to our sailing what will be the consequence in regard to our arrangements?

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 646

25th October 1819

Sir,

Feeling the greatest reluctance in addressing you lest I should be considered too troublesome, I beg to inform you that I am ready to advance my deposit as required by your letter of the 21st inst. But I find that two of my party will not be forthcoming according to agreement. I am consequently at a loss how to redress myself, whether from the defaulters or whether I may be allowed to replace them: as I have a choice of persons whom I consider far preferable to the defaulters in point of mechanical abilities &c.

Permit me Sir to ask one word of instruction relative to the above affair, which if you will be pleased to grant me will greatly relieve the anxiety of

Your very obliged and humble servant

Thomas ROWLES

By your leave I will call at the office daily till I receive your pleasure

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