GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

SAVAGE, William

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 695

75 Crosier Street

Brunswick Square

25th May 1819

My Lord,

A few individuals with their families are induced to emigrate in search of that independency and comfort which the heavy load of taxes in England precludes them from the hope of enjoying.

Their only motive for this step is their conviction of the great improbability of making any future provision for their families; and the doubt and uncertainty of even providing respectably for them during their own lives.

Deeply impressed with a reverence for the constitution of their native country and without any disaffection for its Government, they have resolved not to bend their steps to the United States of America nor to any country likely to be hostile to England; they have therefore turned their attention to a new country with an intention, by good faith and acts of friendship, to conciliate the affections of the natives; and by attention to the cultivation of the land they may purchase to strive by industrious habits to enjoy the blessings of this world, free from the cares which at present are continually preying on their minds.

With these views they have selected New Zealand as being likely from its climate and the disposition of the natives, aided by their own industry, to afford them all the necessaries and comforts of life, divested of the greatest portion of those anxieties that paralyzes their efforts.

Desirous of acting in conformity with the Laws and complying with the necessary Regulations I respectfully apply to your Lordship to ask if His Majesty's Government would allow, without any impediment, a few families to proceed to New Zealand at their own expense, with agricultural implements for the cultivation of their farms, and some tools necessary for the erection of their houses.

Apologising for obtruding myself on your Lordship's time and attention I have the honour to be with the highest respect, my Lord

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant

William SAVAGE

[Note from GOULBURN]

Acknowledge receipt and acquaint him that His Majesty's Gov't have no disposition to throw any impediment in the way of persons proceeding to New Zealand but as there is no British settlement on that island Lord B cannot recommend to any person to embark on such an undertaking. His Lordship has further directed me to acquaint you that in the event of persons proceeding to the Cape of Good Hope they will receive grants of land proportioned to their means of cultivation & that too in a climate & under circumstances by no means less favourable than those which New Zealand could offer.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 697

75 Crosier Street

Brunswick Square

8th June 1819

My Lord,

I beg leave to express my obligation for Mr. GOULBURN's answer to my former letter to your Lordship on the subject of emigrating to New Zealand.

In that answer Mr. GOULBURN says that in the event of persons proceeding to the Cape of Good Hope they will receive grants of land in proportion to their means of cultivating it, but that too in a climate and under circumstances by no means less favourable than those which New Zealand could offer.

As political dissatisfaction forms no part of our motives for emigrating, we should greatly prefer continuing to live under the influence of that constitution which from our infancy we have been taught to revere, and the value of which the experience of manhood has impressed still deeper in our minds; and also under that Government which has raised the Glory of the English Nation to an unprecedented heighth – to living under any other Government in the known world.

With these feelings I should be particularly obliged if your Lordship would have the goodness to cause me to be informed in what situation grants of land would be made at the Cape of Good Hope and under what circumstances.

I believe the capital we should possess would vary from about 300£ to 1000£ each and the greatest part of us are men with families.

It would also be desireable for us to know to what extent His Majesty's Government would be inclined to grant land to each individual or family possessing those means of cultivating it; under what tenure it would be held; and if the timber that might be growing on the land would be the property of the settler or be [reserved?] by His Majesty's Government.

I have the honour to be with the highest respect, my Lord

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant

William SAVAGE

[Note from GOULBURN] Send him the extract in italics from the enclosed paper

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