GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

STRETCH, James St.Leger

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 981

Limerick

Oct 3rd 1819

Sir,

In consequence of a letter you done me the honor to address to me dated 25 September 1818 in reply to mine of the 19 September I now beg leave to call your attention to the subject of that letter, as I am informed that His Majesty's Government are holding out every encouragement for settlers at the Cape of good Hope and being extremely anxious to repair their with my family viz a wife and two daughters, my two sons having already matured, the one an officer in the 38th Reg't the other holding a situation in the Paymaster General's Department. I therefore entreat the favor of you to move my Lord BATHURST on the subject of my wishes to be accommodated with a passage from Cork for myself & family and also an allotment of such ground on my arrival there as my long service as an officer in the army entitles me to. I beg the honor of your reply to be addressed to me Post Office, Limerick. I remain with the most profound respect

Your most obedient humble servant

James St.Leger STRETCH

Half Pay Lieut 67th Regt.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 1034

Limerick, Oct 20 1819

Sir,

I had the honor of addressing a letter to you on the 3rd inst respecting my wishes to go to the Cape of Good Hope with my family & requesting instructions from the Colonial Department on the subject. As I have not been favored with a reply I entreat the favor of an answer as soon as possible.

I am with great respect

Your most obedient humble servant

James St.Leger STRETCH

Half Pay Lieut 67th Regt.

[Transcriber's Note: James St.Leger STRETCH never went to the Cape and died in Limerick in 1821. However, his widow Catherine, nee DEVENISH, arrived in Fort Beaufort from Ireland on 15 August 1826, according to her son's journal. Her son, Charles Lennox STRETCH, was already at the Cape.]

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