GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

TAYLOR, John (2)

National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 25

4 Crown Court

Threadneedle Street

15 July 1819

Sir,

In consequence of the vote of the House of Commons to assist persons wishing to emigrate to the Cape of Good Hope I am induced, most respectfully, to express my wish to proceed there. I am perfectly acquainted with those essential requirements necessary to improve a country, such as making roads, draining of grounds and morasses, laying out advantageous allotments, working of stone quarries and all sorts of minerals, the beneficial employment of workmen, improving and tilling the ground, conveying of water either superficially or subterraneously by pipes or excavation, surveying, the powers and principles of stem engines and other machinery. Age 39. Strong constitution. I served the late Duke of Northumberland for twenty years as his Mineral Agent in Northumberland and as an officer in the [Princes?] Infantry 13 years, loyal to my King and attached to the institutions of my Country. Accustomed to point out the most eligible system to be pursued by workmen in all the above employments. I most humbly beg leave to offer my services in nay way His Majesty's Government may think necessary and shall be content with a moderate remuneration for so doing. I have been requested to proceed to Russia and wrote to the present Duke of Northumberland a few days before he proceeded lately to Alnwick Castle intimating that I should probably have occasion to give a reference to him for ability. His Grace immediately informed me that he would satisfactorily answer any enquiry which might be made and Sir Humphrey DAVY (whom I have had the honour of being personally with) previous to his departure to Italy wrote me that he would gave great pleasure recommending me whenever occasion occurred. I certainly would much rather settle at the Cape than in Russia and I hope to render some service to my country by a steady loyalty and practical knowledge and am at perfect liberty to go at a week's notice and can procure testimonials of ability &c from some of the most scientific men in England. My brother is the Duke of Northumberland's Principal Engineer and Mineral Agent at present and Surveyor of His Majesty's Military Turnpike Road from Newcastle to Carlisle, which I had the management of for many years.

I am Sir

Your most obedient and humble servant

John TAYLOR

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 36

4 Crown Court

Threadneedle Street

22 July 1819

Sir,

I had the honour of receiving your letter with the conditions under which it is proposed to give encouragement to emigration to the Cape of Good Hope.

I perceive the Government reserves the right of working the mines and of making such roads as may be necessary for the ordnance of the Colony.

As I am intimately acquainted with the exploring, surveying and working of mines, making of roads and the most beneficial system of improving a country, making allotments of grounds &c – I should be glad of an appointment at a small salary under Government as an experimental agriculturalist and engineer as I presume several of [obscured] business will be needful at the Cape. Satisfactory recommendations will be given.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most faithful servant

John TAYLOR

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