GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

VERGENST, M

National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 183

July 15th 1819

Sir,

Being informed that I should apply to you for instructions relative to my obtaining permission to settle at the Cape of Good Hope, I shall esteem it a particular favour if you will have the goodness to allow me to wait on you when you are most at leisure, and remain Sir

Your most obedient servant

M. VERGENST

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 184

Woods Hotel

Arundel Street

Panton Square, Haymarket

July 17th 1819

Sir,

The 15th instant I took the liberty to write to you requesting an interview for taking instructions relative to my obtaining permission to settle at the Cape of Good Hope. This day I find in the newspapers the copy of an official circular containing conditions upon which Government intends to encourage emigration to that colony. By writing you the 15th it was not my intention to settle at the Cape in course of the motion made in Parliament by the Lord Chancellor of the Exchequer: this is become a casual incident which I may consider. But before I can do it thoroughly I must request you to have the goodness to inform me if my position of not being a subject of His British Majesty, but a Dutchman will make no difficulty when I for the remainder fulfill the conditions prescribed by Government.

I hope Sir you will forgive me if I request from you a speedy answer that I may the sooner consider the business and take my measures accordingly.

I remain Sir your most obedient servant

M. VERGENST

[note from GOULBURN]

The advantage of receiving assistance from Govt. will necessarily be confined to His Majesty's subjects

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 187

Woods Hotel

July 20th 1819

Sir,

I have to thank you for the ready answer you made me by your letter of yesterday but since the result of the Lord Chancellor's motion cannot concern me I beg leave to recall your attention on my letter of the 15th instant, by which I intended to get the instructions I need for obtaining permission to settle at the Cape of Good Hope, without considering the assistance held out by His Majesty's Government for such British subjects as should be desirous to emigrate to the said Colony.

I remain Sir your most obedient servant

M. VERGENST

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