GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

WATTS, Phillip

National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 221

No.22 Paragon Row

Locks Fields

Newington Butts

16 July 1819

Sir,

I take the liberty applying to you for information as to the mode of being sent out as a settler to the Cape. I am a carpenter and understand farming. I am 50 years of age my wife 40 I can take two sons with me one 16 the other 19 years of age

I am Sir, respectfully

Your humble servant

Phillip WATTS

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 306

No.22 Paragon Row

Locks Fields

Newington Butts

4th August 1819

Sir,

I have to thank you for your letter of the 20th ult and now beg permission to inform you that the mode printed out by Govt. for settlers to proceed to the Cape is not exactly suited to my condition of life. I have therefore to beg that in consideration of my long service in His Majesty's Dock Yard at Deptford that I may be placed at the Cape and allowed a moderate supply of provision and agricultural implements with permission to carry over my own tools. I have been 26 years in the yard during which I was a Rounder 16 years and surved 3 years as sail Foreman afloat and 13 weeks admeasuring Barges at Lyn and 3 years Converter at the Masthouse and at length discharged very much against my inclination at the Reducement which took place under the Earl St. Vincent. I humbly hope therefore that my request of being settled in my own right on the land with moderate provision and implements will not be considered unreasonable. I have two sons now in the Navy and have two more that I mean to take over with me to the Cape.

Am Sir your humble servant

Phillip WATTS

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