GSSAThe 1820 Settler Correspondence
 as preserved in the National Archives, Kew
 and edited by Sue Mackay

1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

WILLSON, Thomas, 1820 Settler

National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 223

Bridge Cottage

Chelsea Waterworks

17 July 1819

My Lord

As your Lordship on a former occasion did me the honor to express a desire to serve me, having devoted the early years of my Life under Government, and possessing Testimonials highly honourable to my Character and professional fame and presuming upon the means of taking out 100 families to the Cape of Good Hope, may I in such a case be distinguished with an appointment as Colonial Secretary, Surveyor or any other respectable office in your Lordships gift or recommendation? If your Lordship will condescend to indulge me with the honor and favour of an Interview upon this interesting subject, I shall feel greatly obliged and it will ever be acknowledged with the warmest gratitude.

I have the honor to be My Lord,

Your Lordships most devoted humble Servant

Thos. WILLSON (Architect & Land Surveyor, formerly within the office of H.R.H. The Duke of York)

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 352

Bridge Cottage

Chelsea Waterworks

14 August 1819

My Lord

A number of Families (most of whom possess small Capitals) having stipulated to proceed with me to the Cape of Good Hope, I trust it will not be considered Intrusive to apply to your Lordship for further information as I feel a certain degree of responsibility necessarily attaching to me with respect to those persons in conducting them on this Interesting Enterprise.

My views at the Cape will embrace Agriculture, Commerce and Building, and I may add Civilization in as much as I may have it in my power to disseminate the first principles of the Fine Arts, and to plant the Sciences.

To render their views practicable my first care has been to connect myself with an extensive Monied Interest by which means I shall secure supplies, in due season, from the Mother Country, but I must request to be informed if Government, at the onset, will afford the aid of Implements and other Stores, which I believe has been the usual practice in such cases?

As Building will form a [material] part of my Speculation (being by profession an Architect) I know your Lordship will see the propriety of my stipulating this in order to secure an Interest for the Capital sunk on Erections and works connected therewith, that the grant from Government at the rate of 100 Acres per family may be made distinctly on the scite of such buildings and contiguous thereto? And it is essential for me to ascertain the natural productions of the [obscured] in respect to furnishing Building Materials, etc, therefore if your Lordship will do me the honor and favour to refer me to any Gentleman who has visited the Interior, it will greatly assist me in carrying these projects into effect and I will then endeavour to assist others, and hope also to render myself useful in [facilitating] to the utmost of my power whatever objects Government may have in view.

I shall have the honor in a few days to furnish your Lordship with a List of those Individuals who propose to accompany me, when I must request to be further informed as to the time we must be prepared to embark, and into whose hands I am to pay the requisite deposit?

I have the honor to be My Lord

Your Lordships most devoted and very humble Servant

Thos. WILLSON

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 372

Bridge Cottage,

Chelsea Water Works

20 August 1819

My Lord

I have the honor to acknowledge your Lordships Circular of the 14th Instant, and trust I shall not be deemed importunate in addressing you again upon the subject of the proposed Settlement at the Cape of Good Hope, as it is very essential for me in making the necessary arrangements of Friends to ascertain distinctly, if the Settlers are to be located (at Algoa as I understand) by Government, or if they are to proceed overland at their own expence?

On arriving at the Cape (that is I conceive Cape Town) I am to receive back, the deposit made in England, by three Instalments, and be enabled to purchase stores of the Government agent at prime cost. Will your Lordship do me the honor to state if that agent may be Instructed to receive Bills in payment for the same at limited dates? It will be obvious to your Lordship that for the better management of the requisite Funds for carrying into effect the views of an Infantile Settlement, whose first Expenditure must be very considerable, and without any proportionate return, some such arrangement will be highly needful and I therefore hope you will excuse the suggestion.

I am at liberty to enter into such stipulations with the persons proceeding to the Cape under my direction as I may judge proper, Government making the grant of land (at the rate of one hundred acres per family) to me Individually, as my security for the fulfilment of the agreement which these persons enter into with me and for the responsibility and anxiety which naturally attends the [obscured] of such direction? Will your Lordship be pleased to intimate that I am correct in forming this conclusion?

I should ill discharge my duty to your Lordship, and to these Individuals, were I to omit stating their regret in ascertaining the total want of dwellings at the place of Settlement; which, together with the Intelligence recently and mischievously published, if not exaggerated, by Journalists respecting the disturbed state of the Country by the Incursions of the [obscured] will I am afraid operate extensively in damping the ardour for emigration notwithstanding the powerful Impetus which is to be found in ‘the Land of promise.'

It is doubtless to be presumed that the next advices will enable Government to counteract the pernicious effects of their publications; and to allay the prejudices which they have engendered, I hope that I have successfully urged the ample protection for British subjects which is always to be found in the wisdom and promptitude of His Majesty's Government in providing the necessary means of defence and future security; and if, canvass covering may be afforded by His Excellency the Governor, as a loan to the Settlers, for a Temporary resource until suitable dwellings can be erected, I flatter myself that these prejudices will soon cease to exist, which I fear may otherwise deter many respectable individuals, whom I most value as practical Men, from uniting with me in carrying into effect, extensive Improvements in the Country.

I have the honor to be

Your Lordships most devoted humble servant

Thos. WILLSON

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 457

Bridge Cottage,

Chelsea Water Works

20 September 1819

My Lord

I have the honor to enclose a list of one hundred families who propose emigrating to the Cape of Good Hope under my direction, and as there are several Individuals now in treaty with me who possess moderate Capitals, and consequently may be useful in giving employment to those who are less fortunate, I must beg your Lordship's permission to allow me to add as many of these, hereafter, as I may be able to agree with.

I must request also to have the nomination of a Protestant Clergyman, agreeable to the Government regulation, having it in contemplation to establish a classical academy at the new settlement and it is likewise my intention to have a similar Establishment for young ladies at Cape Town; an arrangement which your Lordship will doubtless see the propriety of, and therefore I trust I may be [furnished] with the requisite facilities?

I cannot close this Letter your Lordship without remarking that a variety of fears and [prejudices] as to the scite of the proposed settlement appear to offer [obscured] to the spirit of Emigration notwithstanding the apparent [ardour] thousands! having had occasion to discuss the subject with a number of individuals, if I might be allowed to suggest [obscured] which appear calculated to allay those fears and impart [comfort] particularly to the more respectable class of Female emigrants will hope to avail myself of your Lordships indulgence [and] communication.

I have the honor to be My Lord,

Your Lordships most devoted humble servant

Thos. WILLSON

List of Persons proposing to emigrate to the Cape of Good Hope under the Direction of Thomas WILLSON of Bridge Cottage, Chelsea Water Works

[Transcriber's Note: Some of the ages in the table below are obscured in the binding of the correspondence. The column has been left blank]

   

Age

1

Thomas WILLSON

35

 

Mary Ann WILLSON

30

 

Percy

9

 

Douglas

6

 

Thomas

4

2

John FALLON

36

3

John HASKETT

35

 

Ann HASKETT

31

 

Thomas

11

 

John

9

 

Samuel

5

 

Robert

2

 

Eleanor

9

4

Charles ROGGE

40

5

Thomas Coleman BUSH

30

 

Phebe BUSH

27

 

Emily

8

 

Phebe

3

6

Thomas GREENER Sen

34

 

Frances GREENER

31

7

Thomas GREENER Jun

20

 

Eleanor GREENER

19

8

Henry SCHADE

37

 

Sarah SCHADE

31

 

Henry

5

 

Frederick

1

9

John DUFFY

42

 

Ann DUFFY

45

 

Charles

10

 

John

8

 

George

4

10

James STOWE

20

11

John REID

30

 

Martha REID

30

 

John

7

 

Francis

6

 

George

2

 

Charles

4

12

John HOLMES

32

 

Sarah HOLMES

50

 

Edward Redmond HOLMES

12

13

John CHANDLER

34

 

Ruth CHANDLER

30

 

John

13

 

William

3

 

Mary Ann

14

 

Elizabeth

7

14

William SMITH

36

 

Elizabeth SMITH

27

 

James Stow SMITH

17

 

William

13

15

Samuel SCROOBY

31

 

Ann SCROOBY

33

 

Richard SCROOBY

7

 

George SCROOBY

5

16

John ALFRED

45

 

Ann ALFRED

40

17

William BANNEN

27

 

Harriet BANNEN

26

 

Harriet

2

18

Jasper ANDREWS

29

 

Ann ANDREWS

34

 

Elenor

14

 

Charles

11

 

Mary

9

 

Robert

6

 

Ann

2

19

William GOODEWE

 
 

Elizabeth GOODEWE

 
 

Elizabeth

 
 

Emma

 

20

Charles BOUCHER

 
 

Mary BOUCHER

 

21

William BEGER

 
 

Mary Ann BEGER

 
 

Mary Ann

 
 

Sophia

 
 

Frances

 
 

Sabina

 
 

Arthur

 

22

William COCK

 
 

Elizabeth COCK

 
 

William Frederick

 
 

John Anderton

 

23

Joseph TAYLOR

 

24

Richard NICOLLS

 
 

Elizabeth NICOLLS

 
 

Mary Ann

 

25

Charles DALGAIRNS

 
 

Agnes DALGAIRNS

 
 

Eliza

 

Magdalene

 

26

George STOKES

24

27

Thomas STRUTT

20

28

Alfred NEWMAN

20

29

William Redmill CRADOCK

30

30

John BROWN

33

 

Ann BROWN

31

 

John

5

 

Ann

1

31

George STEER

24

 

Mary STEER

21

32

William ROBERTS

24

 

Charlotte ROBERTS

22

33

William POPPLEWELL

21

34

Robert THORPE

20

35

Joseph CROWTHER

26

36

Stephen FENNER

34

 

Clara FENNER

34

 

William

1

37

Thomas RANDALL

40

38

Charles SLEE

26

39

Thomas BAYLIS

33

40

Alexander DUFF

28

 

Ann DUFF

23

 

Elizabeth Ann

2

41

Thomas FARREL

24

42

Patrick DELANEY

24

43

James BOWLER

20

44

John PRATT

38

 

Ann PRATT

37

 

William

15

45

Charles HINTON

24

46

James MUNDELL

24

 

Catherine MUNDELL

27

 

Henry

4

 

Elizabeth

2

47

Frederick WEBB

28

48

James STANLEY

25

 

Ann STANLEY

19

 

John

2

49

Thomas ROBERTS

35

50

Phillip CORNER

24

51

George LOADER

22

52

John MORRYS

26

 

Kate MORRYS

25

53

Mark MOSLEY

24

54

William ARCHER

19

55

Charles LEACH

37

56

William MOWATT

35

57

John SCOTT

39

 

Frances SCOTT

39

 

Eliza

9

 

Edmund

6

 

Henry

4

 

Emma

1

58

John HAMMON

30

 

Sarah HAMMON

26

59

William EALES

23

 

Sarah EALES

22

60

Thomas PIKE

33

 

Sarah PIKE

27

61

William HAY

36

62

Christopher HARRIS

30

 

Ann HARRIS

50

 

Ann HARRIS

32

 

Sarah HARRIS

28

63

John ADDEY

27

64

Stephen HICKSON

 
 

Ann HICKSON

 
 

Ann

 
 

Stephen

 
 

Eliza

 
 

Emma

 
 

Matilda

 
 

Sarah

 

65

Christopher CLARK

 
 

Maria CLARK

 
 

Maria

 
 

Harriet

 
 

Caroline

 
 

William

 

66

William RUSSELL

 
 

Susan RUSSELL

 

67

William BAYLEY

 

68

Jordan EATWELL

 

69

John SMITH

 

70

George ROPE

 

71

Benjamin TAYLOR

 
 

Harriet TAYLOR

 
 

Benjamin

 
 

Harriet

 
 

Charles

 
 

John

 

72

Henry GREEN

19

73

Benjamin BOW

45

 

Mary BOW

43

74

Thomas LANE

20

75

John COCKS

34

 

Anne COCKS

36

 

John

5

 

William

4

 

James

2

76

William AUSTIN

33

 

Mary AUSTIN

31

 

Mary Ann

11

 

Caroline

9

 

William

6

 

Richard

2

77

Henry AUSTIN

35

 

Mary AUSTIN

32

 

Henry

11

 

Henrietta

9

 

Thomas

7

 

Richard

5

 

George

3

78

Thomas DOWSON

30

 

Margaret DOWSON

30

 

Robson Thomas

9

 

Margaret Ann

6

79

George KING

31

 

Elizabeth KING

27

80

John PURDON

40

 

Mary PURDON

34

 

William

11

 

Henry

9

 

Elizabeth

5

 

Charles

2

81

Francis MATHEWS

38

 

Eleanor MATHEWS

25

82

Thomas HALL

30

83

William ALDRIDGE

36

 

Anthony

11

84

George ANDERSON

26

85

John TURVEY

42

 

Isabella TURVEY

45

86

William EDMONDS

29

 

Elizabeth EDMONDS

22

87

John WALL

38

 

Catherine WALL

37

88

Lavis LOWTHER

20

89

John BROWNE

42

 

Margaret BROWNE

37

 

Fanny

12

90

William STROUD

45

 

Jane STROUD

38

 

William

13

 

Jane

11

91

Henry SPENCER

37

 

Frances SPENCER

34

 

Ann

10

92

Robert BURTLES

36

 

Mary BURTLES

38

93

William COLES

34

94

John SHACKLETON

38

 

Harriet SHACKLETON

35

95

James BIRNIE

40

 

Hester BIRNIE

36

 

James

12

96

William DAVIS

27

97

Samuel EAST

 
 

Mary Ann EAST

 
 

Samuel

 
 

Mary

 

98

Stanley HARRIS

 
 

Mary HARRIS

 
 

Mary Ann

 
 

Sophia

 
 

Jemima

 
 

George

 
 

Caroline

 
 

Henry

 
 

James

 

99

Henry TURNER

 
 

Mary Ann TURNER

 

100

Thomas BROOKE

 
 

Margaret BROOKE

 
 

Eliza

 

101

William MORRISSON

 
 

Anne MORRISSON

 
 

William

 
 

Benjamin

 
 

Jacob

 
 

Mary

 

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 537

Bridge Cottage

Chelsea Water Works

14 Octob. 1819

Sir

I have the honor to acknowledge your favour of yesterdays date and beg to inform you that conceiving it to be requisite to take our Medical Assistance as a provision against accidents and diseases, I am at this moment in treaty with a professional Gentleman agreeable to the suggestion of Earl BATHURST; at the same time as I am fearful of incurring too heavy a responsibility in these arrangements allow me to request the honor of waiting upon you to discuss this subject with all deference, I have the honor to be Sir, Your most devoted humble servant.

Thos. WILLSON

[Note on reverse: Thy seeing him can in no degree be necessary & still less as I shall be ready to reply to any written statement he may seek to make]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 541

Bridge Cottage,

Chelsea Water Works

18 October 1819

Sir

I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of the 16 Instant, and have to state that the only difficulty which I have in engaging with a Medical Attendant is that of stipulating the pay per diem for himself and assistant, therefore if Government will afford the requisite aid as [to] salary, the Medical part of my arrangement may be completed forthwith.

I am under similar difficulty in treating with a Minister of Religion, as no specific stipend is to be found in the printed memorandum; if you will do me the honor to intimate what salary is to be attached to appointments, it will greatly facilitate my arrangements, and I shall be enabled in conformity to your requisition of the [obscured] to transmit to you the Returns of my party on Monday next; allow me at the same [time] to ask if I may attach a supernumerary.

I have the honor to be, Sir,

Your most obedient [humble servant]

Thos. WILLSON

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 543

Bridge Cottage

Chelsea Water Works

20 October 1819

Sir

I should regret exceedingly to misapprehend the benevolent views of Earl BATHURST, and I had it previously in contemplation to provide a competent Medical Attendant to accompany my party who I trust will be induced to proceed with us upon the encouragement I had thought proper to hold out.

I have also been in correspondence with several Clergymen upon the subject of Emigration, and I hope in a few days to be able to submit to your consideration, a Minister of the regular Church, who is most congenial to our [wishes] and I flatter myself will not fail to give every satisfaction to Earl BATHURST and I beg Sir to assure you (if in the hurry of the moment I [have] misconceived) that nothing can be further from [my] thoughts than to deviate in the slightest degree [from] the views and intentions of his Lordship.

I have the honor to be Sir,

Your most humble obedient servant

Thos. WILLSON

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 564

Bridge Cottage

Chelsea Water Works

25th October 1819

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose three separate returns of the settlers who have entered themselves to proceed under my direction to the Cape of Good Hope and also a return of those individuals who receive pensions.

From the intimation contained in your circular of the 14th August last, that stores may be obtained in the Colony at prime cost, it is my intention to avail myself of this provision by Government and I must request to be informed if such arrangement includes victualling stores as well as implements of husbandry.

I have guaranteed a suitable remuneration to the two Medical Attendants, who will appear in the returns, for their services during the voyage, and I have written for the requisite testimonials for our Minister of Religion which I will hereafter transmit for your approbation.

If I should find it expedient to withdraw the names of some few of the individuals contained in my returns I trust I may have the indulgence of inserting others to supply the deficit. [Requesting] early information in respect to the conveyance of my party, I have the honor to be Sir

Your most obedient servant

Thos WILLSON

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 562

Bridge Cottage, Chelsea

25th October 1819

Sir,

In the hurry of doing my returns yesterday I find the Pension list was omitted to be enclosed. I lose no time therefore in forwarding it herewith.

I am Sir your most obed't serv't

Thos. WILLSON

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 583

Bridge Cottage

Chelsea Water Works

15 November 1819

My Lord,

Having just received the enclosed note from the Rev'd Charles SANDBY who had engaged to proceed with me to the Cape of Good Hope and whom it appears is promoted to Pernambuco, and as my party are almost wholly composed of persons of the Church of England, who are anxiously desirous of taking out a regular Clergyman, I lose no time in recommending to your Lordship's consideration the Rev'd William BOARDMAN of Blackburn and have transmitted herewith his letter of order. This gentleman is in every respect congenial to our wishes and is patronized by the Bishop of Chester and Thos. CLAUGHTON Esq. MP, therefore I trust for the consolation of my party he will have an appropriate salary assigned to him by Government and that he will receive your Lordship's approbation.

I have the honor to be my Lord

Your Lordship's much obliged and obedient humble servant

Thos. WILLSON

[Note from GOULBURN at foot] Accept the offer

[In clerk's hand at top of letter: The enclosures returned to Mr. BOARDMAN by Mr. MAYER 4 Jan 1820]

[enclosed]

15 Cherry Garden St

Bermondsey

Sunday

My dear Sir,

You will perceive by the underwritten note from the Bishop of London that I must relinquish the pleasing idea of accompanying you to the Cape. I will however do myself the honour of calling again upon you to wish you a prosperous and successful voyage & a happy settlement at the place of your destination. With every good wish for the happiness of yourself, Mrs, WILLSON & family I remain

Most gratefully & sincerely yours

C. SANDBY

Copy: The Bishop of London requests to see Mr. SANDBY on Tuesday at 11 o'clock when he will receive his appointment for Pernambuco

PS I shall hope to recommend in a day or two a very eligible clergyman to supply my place

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 589

Bridge Cottage

Chelsea Water Works

18 November 1819

Sir,

I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of yesterday's date and must beg to address my grateful thanks to Earl BATHURST for the gracious manner in which his Lordship has been pleased to accept my recommendation of the Rev'd William BOARDMAN. I lose no time in forwarding the names and age of that gentleman's family and I have agreeable to your desire returned your letter which is addressed to the Governor of the Cape of Good Hope.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

Thos. WILLSON

Return of the Rev'd William BOARDMAN's family:

William BOARDMAN 45 Minister of Religion

Margaret 40

Mary 24

Judith 23

John 13

James 11

William 8

Susannah [age obscured]

Sarah [age obscured]

Thomas BOARDMAN 19 Farmer

PS To accommodate the number contained in the original return I have superceded the family of SEXTON (No.86 & 87)

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 605

Bridge Cottage

Chelsea Water Works

15 December 1819

Sir,

I feel considerable reluctance conveying to you the feelings of my party in respect to the Surgeons, particularly so as I understand Lord BATHURST contemplates the removal of one of them and I cannot but have every desire to meet his Lordship's wishes without reserve: allow me therefore humbly to intimate as it appears by the enclosed letter that an understanding exists between the Surgeons to render each other medical assistance in their professional [obscured] if their separation can properly be dispensed with I have at the request of the party engaged a Surgeon of good repute to supply the vessel which may be contemplated for the reception of one of my Surgeons. I have [added] the name &c* of that individual and previous to embarkation I must beg leave to attend at the Colonial Office to amend my returns.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your much obliged servant

Thos WILLSON

* Wm. COMBLEY, 29, Surgeon, Sarah 27, Ann 1

[Note from GOULBURN scrawled across letter]

Whatever this refers to –

[Answer from Richard PENN?]

Refers to Letter to Navy Office 2 Nov [illegible]

[Reply from GOULBURN]

Let the Medical Men go with the settlers to where they are attached

[enclosed letter, addressed to Thomas WILLSON]

32 Gt.St.Helens

Dec 15th 1819

Sir,

I was yesterday with the Agent of Transports at Deptford and had the mortification to learn that it is the intention of Government to remove me from your party. I should certainly be very sorry to create difficulty but as you are aware of the engagement that exists between Mr. COCK and myself to render mutual assistance, I should hope by your representation of the case to Earl BATHURST that such removal may be abandoned.

I am Sir

Your most obed't serv't

J. PAWLE

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 621

Bridge Cottage

Chelsea Water Works

24 December 1819

Sir,

I have the honor to enclose my corrected returns which will be found to be within the limits of the original numbers and consequently do not disturb the deposit.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your most obliged servant

Thos. WILLSON

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 627

Bridge Cottage

Chelsea Water Works

27 December 1819

Sir,

I regret exceedingly that the hurry of the moment betrayed me into an error which has caused you additional trouble: upon a [revision?] of the return I perceive an excess of two infants which being a class of settlers that are daily increasing I apprehend may be allowed to remain as they do not affect the amount of the deposit.

And as my party are now embarked with the exception of a few individuals I must beg leave to wait your further instructions with unfeigned respect and grateful acknowledgement for your polite consideration.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your much obliged and devoted humble servant

Thos. WILLSON

[Note from GOULBURN: Act upon this accordingly]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 629

[To Thomas WILLSON from William LOFTIE EATON]

Brixton

24 Dec 1819

Sir,

Since I enter into engagements with to proceed to Cape of Good Hope with you I have made an alliance with Mary Ann LEPPER aged 24 years

Yours truly W. Loftie EATON

[Written at foot in pencil: NB Mr. WILLSON's letter enclosing this is mislaid. It conveyed a request that the wife of the above may be added to Mr. W's list]

[Transcriber's Note: This is written in a different hand to the letter by William LOFTIE EATON filed under E in CO48/43. As that letter was written in copperplate it is probable he got someone to write it for him.]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 631

Bridge Cottage

Chelsea Water Works

28 December 1819

Sir,

I should feel myself unworthy of the confidence you are pleased to honor me with if a single act throughout the whole of the most arduous negotiation in which I have been engaged could with propriety be deemed unjustifiable!

In the case of George CLARK I had taken considerable pains to meet his wishes, conceiving him to be a good subject for a colonist; upon his bare promise I advanced the deposit for him, as well as a great many others, as will be seen in my first return, but as George CLARK did not keep his word with me after repeated promises, and as I was daily in the habit of receiving returned letters amounting to some hundred, one of which I herewith enclose (together with George CLARK's petition) by way of illustrating what I have been subject to. Surely it cannot with propriety be said that I have superseded George CLARK unjustifiably, as he did not make his appearance from the 21 October until the time of embarkation, besides which he refused the enclosed letter! Even up to this period I am willing to pass over this attack upon me, provided he can [obscured] out a vacancy and obtain your permission to have his name inserted.

I have something of a similar [case?] in the person of Joseph DEARMAN whose name also appears in my first return and who requested me to withdraw his name and afterwards to reinsert it, when it was too late. I am quite willing to accommodate this individual upon the same conditions or, as I have repeatedly offered, return his deposit.

William BARRETT has also handed me your note to him of the 24th instant in which you allow him to take his eldest son if a vacancy occurs and as he informed me that a vacancy has occurred this morning in the person of John MOODY I beg to suggest that his son Charles may supply this deficiency.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your most obliged and very humble servant

Thos. WILLSON

[Note from GOULBURN: Make the alteration suggested]

[enclosed letter from George CLARK]

Dover Castle Inn

Deptford

Sir,

Your letter of the 22nd instant refers me to Mr. WILLSON on the subject of my going out to the Cape. I called on him and he informed me he had your positive orders not to allow a name or the number of any family in his list, at which I am not surprised as I am well aware he has done so already beyond the limits at first prescribed otherwise he could not have taken into his list another family in the room of mine (to my ruin) when so firm an agreement was made between him and me for me to be one of his party.

I therefore beg this may be laid before Earl BATHURST and I hope and pray his Lordship will take this my humble petition into his consideration and allow me to be joined to some party going out or allow me to proceed as a single family, having provided myself with such things as are thought nessessary for a settler to take out and likewise having disposed of my little furniture and concerns whereby I maintained my family and I was recomended by His Royal Highness the Duke of York to apply to a settler on a large scale, and having done so and been accepted by him but afterwards rejected most unjustifiably. I hope under all these circumstances his Lordship will allow me to go out as there will be many vacancies by people changing their minds to remain in this country.

I am Sir your dutiful obd't hbl serv't

Geo. CLARK

[attached is a letter addressed to George CLARK at Duddington, near Sittingbourne, Kent]

Bridge Cottage

Chelsea Water Works

21 October 1819

Sir,

It is impossible for me to hold a place for you unless you call upon me immediately

Yors obed'y

Thos. WILLSON

[Note from GOULBURN: Send to Mr. WILLSON for his consideration]

[Transcriber's Note: This letter, forwarded to Thomas WILLSON from the Colonial Office, is a follow up to a letter to the Colonial Office which George CLARK wrote on 20 Dec and which is filed in CO48/42 under C. George CLARK eventually sailed with SEPHTON's Party]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/46, 641

La Belle Alliance

30 December 1819

Sir,

After the polite attention myself and party have received from you it was by no means my wish to have given you additional trouble by making another alteration in my returns, having stated to my party that your last indulgence would be final; but Mr. WILMOT having handed me you memorandum I feel it my duty to suggest that James REID aged 36 Farmer and John DOYLE aged 20 Farmer may supply the places of John WARN No.70 and Richard PIERCE No.100 which I must request you will have the goodness to confirm and also that Charles BARRETT may take the place of Thomas MOODY No.59 and I much hope no further alterations will be required.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your much obliged and obedient servant

Thos. WILLSON

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