1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

STANLEY, John, 1820 Settler

Print
PDF

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 752

No 11 Mulberry Street

Manchester

24th July 1819

My Lord

I feel sorry in taking up your valuable time by requesting some explanations on the subject of emigration to South Africa.

My intentions are to take out settlers for said Colony and as many circumstances requiring explanation necessarily strike me your Lordship will confer a great obligation by giving further information.

Is it understood that the grant of land made to the person taking out settlers, that he is to be the sole proprietor of the land granted, & if not, how far the matter is to be managed with respect to the settlers, being labourers?

Is it understood that the deposit money to be returned in seeds, plants &c at the Colony is deemed adequate to stock the land granted, with live stock, beasts of burden or labour, food for the time whilst the crops are [raised], implements of husbandry, seeds &c? If not what capital will be necessary to take out to stock 1000 acres with the number of settlers stipulated by government?

If any of the settlers should not or would not cultivate the respective 100 acres will the rest all be forfeited?

Would government grant arms & ammunition to defend the settlers against the wild beasts?

Will the government land the settlers at the Cape or on the lands granted? Is the land to be assigned at Algoa Bay or where?

At what time & place will the government appoint a conveyance for settlers from Lancashire? The summer season begins at the Cape of Good Hope about the 1st October & the harvest in Jan & Feb, it would therefore be necessary, (to get the coming crop in time against the rainy season), to appoint a vessel very soon.

To those who are desirous of emigrating the above observations must of course strike them very forcibly and I have no doubt your Lordship will kindly give such information thereon as will much conduce to the welfare of the settlers.

Waiting the honour of a communication on these subjects from your Lordship & requesting pardon for intruding myself on your Lordships time and attention. I remain most respectfully My Lord

Your Lordships most obedient humble servant

John STANLEY

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 808

Manchester

4th Augt 1819

My Lord

I took the liberty of writing on the 24th Ult to your Lordship on the subject of Emigration to the Cape of Good Hope - but as yet am not honoured with a reply. The present is merely to ask whether £400 would be deemed adequate by Government for the person taking out 10 able bodied settlers, as I wish to emigrate with that number & above is the sum which I am to take with me.

I remain My Lord

Your Lordships most obedient humble servt

John STANLEY

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 842

No 11 Mulberry Street

Manchester

11th Augt 1819

Sir

I am honoured with your letter of the 6th Inst on the subject of emigration to the Cape of Good Hope - in reply it will be perfectly agreeable to go out with 10 families as settlers, under the regulations laid down by his Majesty's government & as it may require some time in winding up my affairs in this country preparatory to the voyage, you would perhaps not think it troublesome to inform me with as little delay as convenient how soon a conveyance may offer & if from Liverpool would be more desirable to save expenses.

Independent of the deposit I propose taking out about £400 in money goods & furniture suitable for the settlement, which, from the information received may perhaps be a suitable beginning.

Though I have not any great knowledge in agriculture yet with the assistance of the individuals to be taken out, [doubt not] that every thing may be managed to bring the estate into proper cultivation and reward our industry.

I am myself near 40 years old, of good health with little incumbrance - should any enquiries be necessary I may soon be known as a respectable individual by applying in almost any direction in this town, where I have lived 20 years, or by applying to Mr BEETHAM Esq, Eagle office, Cornhill, London.

If any point of form is required or any thing necessary for me to know with which I am at present not acquainted, you would much oblige me by any communication also when & where the deposit is to be paid.

I remain most respectfully

Sir, your obt humble servt

John STANLEY

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 870

Manchester

19th Augt 1819

Sir

I am honoured with your letter of the 14th instant on the subject of Emigration to the Cape of Good Hope.

Nothing could be more easy to me than to hand you a list of the families I intend to take to the Cape - but upon reflection & due consideration on the subject several circumstances strike me so forcibly that it would be imprudent to let the public know I am about to emigrate, untill I know that my offer is accepted - as for instance my house is a fixture to me for two years & though I have 2 persons in view to take it, yet my intention of going abroad being made known would doubtless make a difference to me of £20. As I have debts out and goods to sell people might [hang] back in paying or in purchasing the goods which could be [more] to a disadvantage besides a run would be made upon me immediately - besides as I depend upon business for support, I must live upon my capital for 2 months to come & I could sell no goods to a profit [upon] the whole it would make £100 difference to me between keeping the matter a secret from the public till a week or two of the time of sailing and making the affair public which would inevitably be the case if I were to [stir] amongst them in order to give you the individuals & respective families - and should Earl BATHURST not accept my offer, I should be laughed at & suffer then also a loss into the bargain which would be serious.

However to comply with your request as much as I can, [annexed] is a memorandum of some families who have expressed their willingness to go under the regulations of government and as soon after the acceptance of my offer to Government, as prudence will permit, I shall engage ten families, the heads of whom will be strong healthy labourers & a suitable mechanic (capable of bearing arms if necessary) all suitable for the function of a new settlement.

You will perhaps excuse me saying that I am anxious to know further on this subject & if my offer is accepted an early answer would be of importance to me.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obt servant

John STANLEY

NB I don't fear I could engage 50 families for the colony but my finances wont allow it

[Enclosed document]

Names of families wishful to proceed to the Cape of Good Hope under his Majesty's regulations as expressed in conversation.

John STANLEY, wife, child under 14 years & 1 woman servant above 18 yrs.

John SIX, wife & 2 daughters above 18.

John THOMSON, wife & 2 children under 14.

James BRADBURN, wife & 4 children under 14.

James HARRIS, wife & 2 children under 14.

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 918

Manchester

2nd Sept 1819

Sir

I was honoured with your letter of the 21st ult for which I return you my thanks. Having had several applications from various families wishing to proceed to the Cape of Good Hope under the Government regulations, I take the liberty of handing their names & families so soon as it is known that I am proceeding thither with my family [I] think it might be increased tenfold.

My intention is to proceed with ten families only as first proposed, and intend being [nice?] in selecting them. I mean if possible to have [more], but such as are capable of bearing arms, good labourers, healthy strong, capable of going properly through the business of a farm, or capable as mechanics to build a house or outbuildings, or in the making or mending agricultural implements - Men of good character, inoffensive in manners, whose minds are not yet polluted with Radical Reform.

I hope the news in the paper of today from the Cape is untrue, as to the scarcity of corn.

If I was not asking too great a favour it would certainly be of very great importance to me to know if my proposals are likely to be accepted.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obt humble servt

John STANLEY

George ASHBROOK, 27 years, wife & 3 children

Thomas HOWARD, 24

James PICKUP, 25, wife & 2 children

John PICKUP, 40, wife & 2 children

William BRADBURN, 30, wife & 2 children

John STEVENS, 26, wife & 3 children

NB The number of men & women 20

the number of children 20

Persons 40

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 941

Manchester

13th Sept 1819

Sir

Since I took the liberty of addressing you last many more applications have been made to proceed to the Cape. Annexed is a memorandum of such as appear likely to suit. I presume that these names and others already transmitted that Earl BATHURST will find no difficulty in printing out those most likely.

I have only to remark that if youth, health, strength of body, height and a general appearance of being a hardy race of men will be requisites, his Lordship will be amply satisfied.

I only want a wheelwright & a blacksmith to compleat.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

John STANLEY

Thomas DUPPREE, single man, labourer, aged 24 years

Thomas HUGHES, wife & 2 children, aged 23

Joseph CHEETHAM, wife & 2 children, aged 21

James BRIDGE, single man, aged 29

Joseph CADING, wife & 1 child, aged 23

John HUGHES, wife & 2 children, aged 26

Richard SCHOLES, single man, aged 22

Thomas COOKE, no wife nor child, aged 32

James TAYLOR, wife & 2 children, aged 26

Joseph CHADWICK, wife & 1 child, aged 28

George DAVENPORT , wife & 2 children, a very clever man as gardener or farmer, aged 44

NB It would be of very great importance for me to know whether my proposals are likely to accepted

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 979

No 11 Mulberry Street

Manchester

2nd Oct 1819

Sir

I was in hopes in this to have heard whether it was my destiny to be accepted for a voyage to the Cape, as suspense is seriously injurious to my future prospects in life - and apprehending that not more than 5 or 6000 can proceed under the government restrictions from so many applications made it appears they will be about 10 blanks to a prize.

Having added the necessary artisans to my list and double the number of settlers I mean to take out - their will be more soon for his Lordships selection of those likely to meet his approbation and to save trouble in looking over the list, I have in this communication made out a list of them together.

George DAVENPORT aged 44 years would be a considerable acquisition, as his knowledge and experience as a farmer & gardener is very considerable and his health & strength very good.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

John STANLEY

Names of families who wish to proceed to the Cape of Good Hope 1819

Age

Man's name

Wife

Children

Trade &c

No.

John STANLEY

Wife

1

1

32

James BRADBURN

Wife

4

Labourer

2

26

THOMPSON

Wife

2

Labourer

3

27

George ASHBROOK

Wife

3

Labourer

4

24

Thomas HOWARD

Single

Labourer

5

38

William BRADBURN

Wife

2

Labourer

6

26

John STEVENSON

Wife

3

Labourer

7

24

Thomas DUPPREE

Wife

Labourer

8

23

Thomas HUGHES

Wife

2

Labourer

9

[21]

Joseph CHEETHAM

Wife

2

Labourer

10

[29]

James BRIDGE

Single

Labourer

11

[23]

Joseph CADING

Wife

1

Labourer

12

26

John HUGHES

Wife

2

Labourer

13

22

Richard SCHOLES

Single

Gardener

14

32

Thomas COOKE

Single

Labourer

15

26

James TAYLOR

Wife

2

Labourer

16

28

Joseph CHADWICK

Wife

1

Labourer

17

44

George DAVENPORT

Wife

2

Farmer &c

18

31

Thomas BRICK

Wife

2

Joiner

19

21

James DIXON

Wife

1

Joiner

20

23

Thomas GOSTEN

Wife

2

Joiner & Wheelwright

21

27

Samuel SPENCER

Single

Blacksmith

22

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 987

Manchester

4th Oct 1819

Sir,

I was yesterday only honoured with your letter of the 3oth ult for which I feel much obliged – every attention will be paid to Lord BATHURST's wishes. I cannot make the returns you request before tomorrow's post when they may be relied upon.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

John STANLEY

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 992

Manchester

5th October 1819

Sir

Inclosed are the 3 returns of settlers to the Cape under my directions. If it is intended there should be 9 settlers only besides myself, please to erase No 9 - say Robert KNOWLES - which is what I have all along understood, but to prevent any loss of time I have returned 10 settlers besides myself, which be kind enough to inform me of when you favour me with further instructions.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient servant

John STANLEY

NB it is presumed that as the amount of the children is under the number of the regulations under 14 years age, that £100 is all the deposit required, the whole being engaged to me for 3 years from the day of location in the Land.

[Printed] Return of Settlers proceeding to the Cape of Good Hope under the directions of Mr John STANLEY of Manchester

Names of the men

Age

Profession or Trade

Names of the Women

Age

Male Children

Age

Female Children

Age

John STANLEY

37

Merchant

Sarah

27

James BRADBURN

32

Labourer

Margaret

26

John

10

Maria

6

Mary

4

Ann

1

George ASHBROOK

27

Labourer

Catherine

24

George

2

Mary

6

Eliza

4

Thomas HOWARD

24

Labourer

John STEVENSON

26

Labourer

Ann

27

Mary

5

Sarah

3

Hannah

1

James BRIDGE

29

Labourer

Joseph CADING

23

Labourer

Ann

20

William PENNINGTON

25

Labourer

Robert KNOWLES

23

Labourer

Joseph CHEETHAM

21

Labourer

Sarah

23

Thomas

6

William

1

William Little BLAKE

38

Cobbler

Agnes

30

John

7

Ann

5

Robert

2

Total number of the men

11

Total number of the women

7

Number of persons above 14 years of age

Number of children under 14 years of age

15

Total number of the whole party

33

Total amount of deposit money

£122.10

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 1048

Manchester

27th October 1819

Sir

I am honoured with your letter of the 21st instant and agreeably thereto, shall remit by Thursday's mail the sum of one hundred£ as directed.

It grieves me much to be under the necessity of stating that in consequence of a report* circulated by John BANCROFT, chain maker of Salford, five of those men returned - BRADBURN, STEPHENSON, BRIDGE, PENNINGTON & CADING have concluded not to go, which I am convinced will be productive of considerable inconvenience though others have since supplied their places.

I certainly was not prepared for this defection as they gave every assurance of going and being poor families either partially employed or out of work altogether, they could give me no security - nor do I see any certainty of making a true return until they are actually on board a ship - when you may rely on the deposit being compleat and a correct return.

As I wish to take out a few articles which have paid duty, such as glass, [spirits], [wine], printed calicos, tea &c it would be of service for me to know that as they will be in small quantities not with the usual expense incurred in shipping, whether the usual [obscured] would be dispensed with for the settlers and the duty returned - and if Government will allow it to be shipped for the use of the settlers at the Cape, the current coin of the realm, as certainly gold, silver and copper coin would be very convenient in that Colony, and I beg leave further to know, if we are to be shipped [at] Liverpool the probable time of sailing - circumstances of very great importance to me, as a guide in selling my household furniture & settling the whole of my affairs, as I could not leave this place under 14 days notice.

If cash were advanced to government would it disposed to give bills in the Colony for the amount or if not would they be kind enough to name some merchant of responsibility who would do so. I fear I shall be troublesome in writing so long a letter and crave your indulgence.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient servant

John STANLEY

*The report is that Government allows one £5 per head for every settler going out and when they arrive there, they are to be made slaves. I have sent Mr HILL a bankers bill for £50, but could not procure another in time for post & it will go on Saturday.

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 1064

Manchester

4th November 1819

Sir

I was honoured with your letter of the 30th ult for which I feel greatly obliged. Referring you to my last letter, I have now the pleasure of handing you an amended return of settlers in lieu of those who have broken their engagements, and I sincerely hope no other will be found necessary.

Mr HILL has already acknowledged the receipt of £100, and the remaining £22.10.0 shall be immediately sent.

I am most respectfully Sir

Your very obedient servant

John STANLEY

[Handwritten] Account of settlers proceeding to the Cape of Good Hope under John STANLEY's direction

No.

Men's names

Age

Women

Age

Boys

Age

Girls

Age

Profession

1

William CALVERLEY

35

Jane

28

William

14

Eliza

2

Labourer

James

5

2

James COWIE

28

Mary

28

Ann

3

Labourer

Margaret

3 mo

3

Thomas BOWKER

25

Labourer

4

Hugh MELLON

21

Labourer

5

John BROGDEN

22

Labourer

6

Solomon SHEPHERD*

30

Elizabeth

24

Elizabeth

1

Labourer

Instead of the following who refuse to go

1

James BRADBURN

32

Margaret

26

John

10

Maria

6

Labourer

Mary

4

Ann

1

2

John STEPHENSON

26

Ann

27

Mary

5

Labourer

Sally

3

Hannah

1

3

James BRIDGE

29

Labourer

4

Joseph CADING

23

Ann

20

Labourer

5

William PENNINGTON

25

Labourer

6

Joseph CHEETHAM

21

Sarah

23

Thomas

6

Labourer

William

1

*[Transcriber's note: Solomon SHEPHERD is not listed in The Settler Handbook but appears in Hockly's ‘Story of the 1820 Settlers of 1820' as a member of STANLEY's Party]

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 1092

Manchester

29th November 1819

Sir

I was honoured with your letter of the 9th inst with a letter to the Governor of the Cape of Good Hope for which please accept my thanks.

I have been in Liverpool & and on enquiry at the Collector's (of His Majesty's Customs) I find that I cannot take out for myself & party several things absolutely necessary for our defence. My party positively refuse to proceed unless allowed to take out fire arms & ammunition, shot &c all necessary for their defence, in which I can have no reasonable objection. I wish to take with me for the use of my party & self, a rifle piece, and a dozen strong fowling pieces and bayonets with a supply of shot, powder &c for two years - £50 in the current coin of this realm - and have no doubt you will be kind enough to get me an order in Council to that effect for these things and any others that we may find necessary for our comfort and safety.

Any further information on the subject of emigration, the time and place of embarkation would be most thankfully received, as the whole are extremely anxious about it as I am now and have been living on my Capital and wishful not to reduce it too much, I cannot help feeling an equally strong desire for the day to be appoint'd for sailing. Information on that [head] would be highly desirable.

Wishing to be honoured with an early reply I remain very respectfully Sir

Your obt humble servt

John STANLEY

[GOULBURN'S notation] Re the Council request the Treasury to give directions for permitting the export of these arms

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 1128

Star Inn

Liverpool

Decr 29th 1819

Sir

Annexed is a new list of settlers proceeding under my direction to the Cape, as others have deserted me - when the ship gets into the River, I may be under some certainty of their going - but so long as any are on land, nothing can be depended upon. It is painful for me to give further trouble but hope it is a final return.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your humble servant

John STANLEY

Memorandum of families proceeding to the Cape of Good Hope under the direction of John STANLEY of Manchester

Men

Age

Women

Boys

Girls

George ASHBROOK*

-returned before-

William CALVERLEY

-returned before-

James COWIE

-returned before-

Thomas BOWKER

-returned before-

Hugh MELLON

-returned before-

John BROGDEN

-returned before-

Solomon SHEPHERD

-returned before-

Thomas CALVERLEY

18

Instead of Thomas HOWARD

Abraham WILD

30

Ann 29

Abraham 6

Betty

(labourers)

Henry 1

Maria

William PENDLEBURY

24

John STANLEY

-returned before-

*another girl born since last return, not yet named, one month old

 

article_separator

 

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 1126

Liverpool

Dec'r 29th 1819

Sir,

Since writing to you this evening with a fresh return I have been applied to by Wm. CALVERLEY to request Lord BATHURST will be good enough to add to my list his son Richard aged 9 years – now as CALVERLEY is a man of excellent character I certainly do wish his said son to join us if it will not materially interfere with his Lordship's directions.

Inclosed are £3 for the boy's deposit interim. I have the honor to be most respectfully Sir

Your obed't humble serv't

John STANLEY