1820 Settler Correspondence before emigration

ALL the 1819 correspondence from CO48/41 through CO48/46 has been transcribed whether or not the writers emigrated to the Cape. Those written by people who did become settlers, as listed in "The Settler Handbook" by M.D. Nash (Chameleon Press 1987), are labelled 1820 Settler and the names of actual settlers in the text appear in red.

LEIGH, John (Independent Settler), 1820 Settler

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 347

24 St.Mary Axe

London

18th August 1819

My Lord,

Upon receiving your General Circular relating to emigration to the Cape of Good Hope I beg respectfully to submit the following observations:

1st It does not appear that Government make any provision to the settlers against invasion from the Caffres presuming they commit plunder or depredation.

2nd What security can a settler have that the men he takes out are bound to stay in his own employ and for what length of period and if an agreement made in this country is binding in the Cape?

3rd Provided one hundred settlers commenced as a Company, taking out 1000 men or families, the Company making the deposit required by Government, are the 100 members obligated individually to go out to live there or will part representation be the same, upon getting the grant of 100,000 acres (allowing a clergyman of the Church of England with the provision proposed by Government)

4th Have the settlers a choice in the land proposed to be allotted to them? Or does it rest with the Government here? Or with the Government at the Cape? And can a settler choose his own situation in the colony? Have the first settlers any and what advantage?

5th It is proposed by Government that the transports sail in November next: presuming a Company be formed of 100 members as before mentioned and sail with the emigrants forthwith, finding their own ships (making the deposit required by Government), what are the terms proposed by Government for the passage and victualling? And can a grant be immediately made upon their arrival, presuming such Company consider September the best month to sail in? The settlement upon Saldanah Bay would be advantageous as it is supposed the Company would have very considerable exports and imports. Can they insure a settlement in that Bay? Having been for a series of years in Liverpool, considerably interacted and concerned with the African trade, it was invariably deemed by my most experienced Captains that August & September were the best months to sail in for the general trade and commerce of that country, thereby getting into the country in the spring or what is considered the finest weather in that country.

Begging your Lordship will excuse these intrusive questions and will give me as early an answer as pleases your Lordship's convenience. I beg to subscribe myself my Lord

Your Lordship's most obedient & devoted servant

Jno. LEIGH Jun

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 363

No.24 St.Mary Axe

25th August 1819

My Lord,

I beg leave to acknowledge receipt of Mr. Henry GOULBOURN's letter of the 23rd instant and feel particularly obliged for the communications therein, which are quite intelligible and satisfactory.

Having purchased a vessel of two hundred and twenty five tons Register, late His Majesty's schooner Picton, and now called Mary Ann Sophia, which I have laid on for the Cape of Good Hope for the purpose of taking passengers and emigrants, Myself with nine other Gentlemen propose forming a small company and taking out the quantity of persons or families together with articles of husbandry, building materials &c in conformity with your Lordship's circular upon the consideration that we are to have the grant of land accordingly. I presume therefore that your Lordship will pay me (as the ship owner) the same passage money & for victualling for the emigrants as your Lordship may contract to pay for transports for this purpose.

I beg to observe to your Lordship that my vessel is known as a remarkable fast sailer and I beg to submit her to your Lordship's service to carry dispatches or other [obscured] and leave it to your Lordship to make what remuneration your Lordship pleases.

It is my present intention she should sail in all next month but if your Lordship should find you might have occasion to make use of her “sooner or later” than this I feel disposed to meet your Lordship's wishes in every respect and have the honor to subscribe myself my Lord

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant

Jno. LEIGH Jun

[note from GOULBURN across bottom: if he will specify the number of persons he proposes to take out his proposal will be taken into consideration]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 371

No.24 St.Mary Axe

30th August 1819

My Lord,

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of Mr. Henry GOULBOURN's letter of the 25th current and beg leave to say that I shall shortly submit to your Lordship the description and number of the emigrants I am taking to the Cape of Good Hope for your Lordship's approval, together with my assurance to conform myself strictly to all the conditions upon which His Majesty's Government have offered to grant lands in the colony.

I beg the favor of a reply to that part of my letter addressed to your Lordship on the 25th instant relating to the passage money and victualling for emigrants which I might take out in my own vessel, the Mary Ann Sophia.

I am my Lord

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant

Jno. LEIGH Jun

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 375

No.24 St.Mary Axe

September 2nd 1819

My Lord,

We the undersigned having it in contemplation to proceed to the Cape of Good Hope with ten families each under our direction in conformity to the Government regulation, whereby we shall become entitled to distinct interests as landed proprietors, and having other important views connected with the shipping interests of the colony, it behoves us to represent to your Lordship with a view to protecting and securing those interests, more particularly as it regards good anchorage and a ready communication with the seat of the colonial government and also with the mother country, that it is our individual and united wish both as merchants and agriculturalists to obtain such grants of land as we shall become entitled to on that part of the coast which approximates to Saldana Bay. We therefore most respectfully submit this to your Lordship's consideration and approval entreating that we may be permitted to land and to make our respective settlements on this part of the coast by having the said grants assured and confirmed to us by your Lordship. We have the honor to be

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servants

Jno LEIGH Jun, 24 St.Mary Axe

Henry WOOD Liverpool

Ben. MATHEWS 59 Compton St, St.John St

Simon HANE 10 Little East Cheap

Gregory MAHON 69 Oakley Street Westminster

Frederick WEBB Bedford Coffee House Covent Garden

Alexander [DUFF?] Bedford Coffee House Covernt Garden

Chas. DALGAIRNS No.1 New Court Bow Lane

John HYSLOP Dumfries

J. BROWN Henrietta St.

Thos. MAHON Kentish Town

[note from GOULBURN across bottom: it is not concurrent with the views of the Govt. in making a new settlement at the Cape to make grants of land at Saldanha Bay]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 387

No.24 St.Mary Axe

September 10th 1819

My Lord,

Having had a considerable correspondence through the medium of Mr. GOULBURN regarding emigration to the Cape of Good Hope I beg permission on behalf of myself and nine other gentlemen to solicit the honor of a personal interview with your Lordship, having in view a private motive tending to the comfort of the parties going, and which will not militate against the arrangements already made by his Majesty's Government.

I have the honor to be my Lord

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant

Jno. LEIGH Jun.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 396

No.24 St.Mary Axe

Sep 16 1819

Mr. John LEIGH Jun presents his compliments to Mr. Hy GOULBURN and finding by his letter of the 13th instant that Earl BATHURST is out of Town he would feel obliged by an interview with Mr. GOULBURN and will deem it a favor Mr. GOULBURN's giving him a line stating when Mr. LEIGH can have the pleasure to wait upon him.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 406

No.24 St.Mary Axe

September 20th 1819

My Lord,

From the numerous applications which have been made to me by persons who wish to emigrate to the Cape of Good Hope I am inclined to enter into a different arrangement than the one already proposed and my object is both to save considerable expence and trouble to his Majesty's Government.

I therefore submit that if your Lordship will cause me a grant of land of one hundred acres for every person I send out to the Cape of Good Hope I will send them out without any expence whatever to his Majesty's Government, making my own agreement and arrangement with the party's going out – and I have no hesitation in stating I can send any number his Majesty's Government may require.

My own ship and the parties going out shall be submitted to your Lordship for approval in conformity to that part of your Lordship's first circular.

I beg to ask one question from your Lordship relating to Duty's. Contemplating a considerable whale fishery I wish to be informed whether the Oil will be admitted to British Plantation Duties.

I have the honor to remain my Lord

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant

Jno. LEIGH Jun.

[note from GOULBURN: write to him according to Lord B's docket and with respect to [last] refer him to Board of Trade]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 414

No.24 St.Mary Axe

Oct 6th 1819

My Lord,

I took the liberty of addressing your Lordship on the 21st ult (a copy of which letter I herewith annex) not having received any reply from your Lordship I fear it may have miscarried or has escaped your Lordship's notice. May I therefore beg a favor of your Lordship's reply at your Lordship's earliest convenience, and am my Lord

Your most obedient humble servant

Jno. LEIGH Jun.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 421/423

Sun Wharf

Upper Thames Street

October 27th 1819

My Lord,

I have had the honor to receive a communication through Mr. Henry GOULBURN that your Lordship would lend a favorable consideration to any specified proposal I might make of the nature of my proposition of the 20th ultimo, viz that “provided your Lordship would give me a grant of one hundred acres of land to be made to me for every person I sent out I would send them out free of any expence to His Majesty's Government.”

In conformity with my proposition and your Lordship's favorable consideration of the same I herewith beg leave to submit to your Lordship twenty persons or families I am in the first instance sending out in the Amphitrite, Captain DAVISON, a vessel I have chartered for passengers and have engaged the leaves here before the 10th of next month, and a very considerable number of passengers are already engaged to proceed by her.

I have the honor to remain my Lord

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant

Jno. LEIGH Jun.

Name and Description of the Persons taking out the Settlers:

David Thos. NIGHTINGALE Lieut. RN, 37

Lieut. NIGHTINGALE many years amongst the West India Islands & commanded one of HM schooners for some time

Thomas BOWYER, 40, farmer from Bedfordshire, a very superior Agriculturalist and Veterinary Surgeon

Names of Settlers

Profession or Trade

Age

Names of Women

Age

Male Children

Age

Female Children

Age

Francis MATHEWS

Whale fisherman

38

Eleanor

26

Jacob LETTERSTED

Farmer

22

 

 

 

 

 

 

John SEDGEWICK

Tanner & currier

21

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert HAYNES

Farmer

31

 

 

 

 

 

 

William BLACK

Lincolnshire farmer

32

Elizabeth

22

Elizabeth

1

Jas. GREENLEAF

Essex farmer

29

Sarah

24

 

 

 

 

Joseph WOOD

Baker & corn chandler

20

David THOMAS

Carpenter & builder

27

Charles LEACH

Farming harness maker

39

Wm.Kant BISHOP

Agriculturalist

20

Edward EAGER

Farmer

20

William THORNELOW

Farmer

20

John ANSON

Farmer

45

Elizabeth A

45

Henry A

13

Elizabeth A

16

John ANSON Jun

Farmer

21

Ambrose A

12

Hannah/Sarah A

10/8

John BRIDGER

Maltster

36

Ann

43

Henry B

13

Mary Ann B

16

Charles GAMMON

Berkshire farmer

19

Eliza B

12

David BARNARD

Whale fisherman

20

 

 

 

 

Ann B

9

Henry BREST

Agriculturalist

54

[Sophia]

46

[Transcriber's note: the settlers of NIGHTINGALE's Party are not listed in The Settler Handbook but appear in ‘Story of the British Settlers of 1820' by H.E. Hockly. Sarah GREENLEAF is listed as having sailed on the Garland. John BRIDGER died in 1821 but his wife and three younger children emigrated to Tasmania in 1825 where Ann BRIDGER ran Hobart's oldest inn – see http://www.australianbeers.com/pubs/bushin/bush.htm]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 426

No.24 St.Mary Axe

October 30th 1819

Sir,

With reference to my letter to Earl BATHURST on the 27th current, submitting to his Lordship certain names of persons and families I am sending to the Cape of Good Hope by my first vessel the Amphitrite, and in concurrence with your inclination so to do contained in your letter of the 6th instant, I this morning waited in Downing Street with the hope of having a personal interview with you upon the subject but not finding you in Town I had the pleasure of an interview with Mr. SMITH and to whom I explained my views. I am desirous in the first instance that you will admit of my taking out one hundred persons or families according to the proposition I made to Earl BATHURST as I have already made my provisions and arrangements for this number and I beg to observe that the reason I only submit twenty by the Amphitrite is having suitable accommodations left only for this number by this vessel and [another?] consideration with me I have sent by this vessel those description of persons whose business it will be to make suitable temporary accommodations and provisions for the party I am sending out after by my other vessels, together with every description of building materials, agricultural implements &c. I beg further to add that I am particularly circumspect in selecting the persons I take out, in the first instance, as to their possessing some competance themselves or to insure the possibility of their not becoming a burthen to the Colony, and in the second place to particularly investigate their ability and capacity in their respective professions, and in the third place I select them of good moral character and those who I must be thoroughly convinced are loyal subjects to his Majesty and to the Government.

I presume I shall be entitled to carry out a Minister of the Church of England with a salary assigned to him by his Majesty's Government for the one hundred persons or families I am desirous of taking out.

I have the honor to remain Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

Jno. LEIGH Jun

[Draft of Henry GOULBURN's reply below]

I have received and laid before Lord B your letter of the 30th ult and am directed to acquaint you that his Lordship cannot enter into any engagement for permitting you to receive grants of land at the rate of 100 acres for each individual whom you may convey to the Cape, hence for any further number than those already specified in your letter of the 27th ult and that even should his Lordship hereafter deem it advisable to permit you to send out with similar advantages an additional number to the extent specified, his Lordship would not consider it necessary to assign a separate salary to a Minister.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/44, 447

Sun Wharf

Upper Thames Street

November 23rd 1819

My Lord,

I had the honor to receive Mr. GOULBURN's letters of the 2nd and 3rd instant, the former enclosing me a letter to the Governor of the Cape, desiring him to make me a grant of land for the settlers I sent out on the Amphitrite and the latter acknowledging receipt of my letter to Mr. GOULBURN of the 30th ult, and which letter he laid before your Lordship, and received your Lordship's directions to inform me “you could not enter into any engagement for permitting me to receive grants of land at the rate of one hundred acres for each individual whom I might convey to the Cape of Good Hope, further than the number I had already stated in my letter of the 27th, and that even should your Lordship hereafter deem it advisable to permit me to send out with similar advantages an additional number to the extent specified, your Lordship would not consider it necessary to assign a separate salary to a Minister for these persons.”

I beg leave to observe to your Lordship that upon receipt of your Lordship's communication of the 6th ultimo in reply to the proposition I had the honor to submit by my letter of the 20th September, I entered into engagements and made arrangements to take out one hundred settlers at my own expence, in conformity with such proposition, and which I considered had your Lordship's entire approbation.

I humbly beg your Lordship will consider that any deviation from my arrangements and the engagements I have made with settlers I take out would be attended with great inconvenience and wholly frustrate my object and views.

I beg to state to your Lordship that I have five ships going out and that I propose sending twenty settlers by each ship, taking precautions they are completely provided for, and I send out by the first vessels such description of men as to make suitable accommodation for the reception of the settlers following, and I herewith annex for your Lordship's approval twenty persons or families I am sending by the Garland, Captain BROWN, which vessel I have chartered for the purpose of taking out settlers and passengers, the Captain being an experienced man in the trade, and I ship out every description of produce, implements &c which may be considered useful, or what they may require to promote their prospects and even comforts.

I beg to add further to your Lordship that I will dispense with the request I made to your Lordship for a Minister assigned to my settlers, taking care myself they shall be provided with every proper instruction in this respect.

I have the honor to be my Lord

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant

Jno. 1 Jun.

List of Settlers for the Cape of Good Hope on the Garland, Alex. BROWN

Names of the Settlers

Profession or Trade

Age

Names of the Women

Age

Male Children

Age

Female Children

Age

LEIGH, John Jun

Agriculturalist

18

PARKER, John

Farmer

35

Elizabeth

34

George Francis

12

William Frederick

10

Thomas Daniel

5

ALDRED, William

Farmer

37

Elizabeth

38

Anthony

13

Matilda

14

Susan

10

Elizabeth

4

Emma

1

STILLWELL, William

Farmer

25

Martha

21

William

1

JURY, James

Painter

27

Mary

23

James

1

NICHOLLS, William

Farmer

22

NICHOLLS, Benjamin

Farmer

18

CAPEL, James

Farmer

38

HALL, Thomas

Farmer

30

ANDERSON, George

Farmer

28

FRAMES, William

Mariner

25

JOHNSON, Samuel

Farmer

45

BRIDGEMAN, John

Farmer

40

ORTON, William Marle

Farmer

20

ELLIOTT, John

Cooper

38

MAYOR, Alfred

Farmer

25

ALLEY, Thomas

Farmer

42

Susannah

41

Thomas

14

Mary Ann

18

Samuel

12

Susanah

11

Eliza

9

BRICKHILL, Thomas

Farmer

32

Jane

31

William

4

PAGE, John

Farmer

37

NEEDHAM, John

Farmer

28

[Transcriber's note: the settlers on the Garland are not listed in The Settler Handbook but appear in ‘Story of the 1820 Settlers' by H.E. HOCKLY and are listed as independent, with first names not given. William Marle ORTON is listed as a settler arriving on the Amphitrite. George ANDERSON is listed as sailing on the Mary Ann Sophia with Gen. Charles CAMPBELL's Party]

Sun Wharf

Upper Thames Street

December 2nd 1819

My Lord,

I beg leave herewith to send your Lordship a copy of my letter of the 23rd instant with a list of passengers proceeding as settlers by the Garland, Captain BROWN, for the Cape of Good Hope under my arrangements, for your Lordship's consideration and approval.

I crave your Lordship's attention to what I stated, that having made my arrangement for the number named, any deviation would be of serious inconvenience to me and must necessarily alter my plans. I therefore hope that your Lordship will forthwith cause me a grant of land accordingly, which is all I require. I have the honor to subscribe myself

Your Lordship's most obedient humble servant

Jno. LEIGH Jun