Farmers Chronicle (Cathcart)

The Farmers Chronicle 1889 - 2 - April to June

Thursday 4 April 1889

We have to thank Mr.DELL for the following cure for worms in lambs: 1 teaspoonful of turpentine, 4 drops of laudanum and a tablespoon of sweet milk to each lamb. The lams must be kept 12 hours in the kraal before administering the dose.

ELLIOTT BROS.& GILSTAIN, Cathcart
Auctioneers, Brokers, Transfer Law & General Agents. Debts collected. Estates administered and Agency of every description discharged with secrecy, punctuality and dispatch. Agents for Mutual and Star Life Assurance Companies and South British Fire Insurance Company
Hemming Street, Cathcart

Thursday 11 April 1889

We are sorry to see by the Cape Mercury that Diptheria is reported to have made its appearance in King William’s Town

Diptheria has made its appearance in the Tarkastad district, where in a few days thirteen cases appeared, four ending fatally.

The little cottage occupied by Mr. and Mrs. PHILLIPS near the new Undenominational School, Kimberley, in which boot and shoe making was carried on, was last night about 12 o’clock destroyed by fire. The occupants were in bed when the fire broke out and we (Record) deeply regret to announce that Mrs. PHILLIPS lost her life in the flames, her husband being unable to rescue her when making his escape.

The town of Johannesburg is said to extend in circumference over five miles, and the population is computed at between forty five and fifty thousand. Poor Oom Paul must be sorely tried to know how he will be able to keep such a mass of ever increasing “uitlanders” in subjection under his not very grandmotherly laws, and how long they will submit to them. U Times

DIVISIONAL COUNCIL
The ordinary monthly meeting was held on Wednesday 10th instant.
Present: F.E. PHILPOTT Esq CC & RM (Chairman), Messrs. CALDERWOOD, FRONEMAN, KEMP, VERRAN and WIGGILL

Thursday 18 April 1889

J.P.GILLINGS is still alive and kicking

IN MEMORIAM
FRANCIS WILLIAM GILSTAIN
Quite a gloom was cast over the town on Monday morning last when it became known that the above named gentleman had passed away at Johannesburg on Saturday evening last, at the early age of thirty one years. Five short weeks ago the lamented deceased left Cathcart for Johannesburg, where in connection with the firm of Elliott Brothers and Gilstain, of which he was an honoured member, he had started in the broking business. It was only last Thursday that the first news of his illness reached Cathcart. A telegram was received on that day stating that Mr. GILSTAIN was down with fever, but that nothing serious was anticipated. On Saturday morning another telegram of an alarming nature was received, intimating that unexpected congestion of the brain had set in and that he was rapidly sinking. The worst was then feared, and these fears were unhappily well founded by the news of his death, which took place at half past nine on Saturday evening. He was buried on Sunday, and we are informed that a large number of sympathising friends, and the general public, followed the remains to the grave. The late Mr. GILSTAIN was one of the oldest residents in Cathcart, having settled in the town when it was first formed, and to say that he had endeared himself to all by his kindly manner, and genial disposition, is bestowing but faint praise. His name was a household word in the town and District; and he was in every sense of the word a true gentleman. He freely gave both time and money to the furtherance of all local institutions, and his heart and hand were ever open to those who truly stood in need of help and assistance. When the Municipality was established he was appointed Town Clerk, and for many years he faithfully and zealously performed the duties of that office, as well as the duties pertaining to the office of Secretary to the Divisional Council. A sound and keen man of business, he soon pushed his way to the front, and in 1885 he was admitted as a partner into the (at that time) firm of Elliott Brothers, and he continued an honoured member of that firm up to the time of his death. In 1887 he was elected Chairman of the Municipality, and re-elected in 1888, and was a Justice of the Peace for the District of Cathcart. His sterling qualities and great business capacity marked him for a wider sphere of usefulness, and on his firm extending their business operations and opening a branch at Johannesburg, Mr. GILSTAIN was at once selected to manage it. Deceased was also a Lieutenant in the Frontier Mounted Rifles, and always displayed a lively interest in the Volunteer movement, and was greatly esteemed and beloved by his brother officers. In his private life he was a devoted and loving husband and a fond and affectionate son. For many years he had been the mainstay and support of his aged mother, and how dutiful a son he was, those who knew him best can tell. To his sorrowing widow and mother we tender our heartfelt sympathy, and whilst they mourn his loss they have the consolation and assurance of knowing that they mourn not as those without hope. His name and memory will long be enshrined in the hearts of the people in this district. His works do follow him. Requiescat in Pace.

Birth at Cathcart on the 8th instant the wife of Chris. BARNES of a daughter

DIED on the 16th March 1889, Lola Leslie, infant daughter of W.D and S.M. BENTLEY, aged 11 months and 27 days.

The Albany Divisional Council are at loggerheads over the appointment of a Secretary and Road Inspector. It appears that tenders for the joint offices were recently called for, and the tenders range from £180 to £325 per annum. Mr. Christopher S. WEBB tendered for the first mentioned sum, and Mr. Henry HILL for the latter. Mr. HILL is the tried and faithful servant of the Council, and a numerously signed petition was read in favour of retaining his services. On going to the vote four members voted for Mr. HILL, and four for Mr. WEBB, whereupon the Chairman gave his casting vote in favour of the former gentleman. We think the Chairman took a very sensible view of the matter, in spite of Mr. HILL's tender being so much higher than Mr. WOODS [sic]. Economy is all very well, but there is such a thing as false economy, and the idea of anyone properly carrying on the duties of Secretary and Road Inspector to so large a Division as Albany for a paltry £15 per month is simply absurd. Work for such a miserable pittance would never be properly performed. Why, one third of the amount would be spent in maintaining horses. Nothing was ever gained by employing under paid servants, nor never will be.

Thursday 25 April 1889

GILLINGS is still watching, and waiting for some of his numerous debtors to pay up

Our late and highly esteemed townsman Mr. H.T.ELLIOTT is once more amongst us, having come down on business connected with the recent sad loss his firm have sustained by the death of Mr. GILSTAIN. Mr. ELLIOTT is looking well, and speaks in high terms of Kokstad as a sheep farming district. We are heartily glad to welcome him in our midst, though regretting the circumstances rendering his visit a necessity.

Thursday 2 May 1889

Mr. James HOBBS notifies that he has closed all roads crossing his farm Cullein not marked on the diagram

On Tuesday last at the Wesleyan Church, Alexandra Road, King Wm’s Town, Mr. J. ANGOVE of Kimberley was united in matrimony to Miss Mina DANIELS, daughter of our old friend Mr. S. DANIELS of King Wm’s Town. The bride was attended by her sisters and bothers. The newly wedded couple have left for East London, en route for Natal and England, and we hope they will enjoy long life and prosperity.

Thursday 9 May 1889

FAREWELL DANCE TO MR.& MRS. J.T. HOCKEY
When it became known that the above named lady and gentleman were leaving the Cathcart District, expressions of regret were manifest on all sides, and those who had lived near Mr. HOCKEY for the past ten years insisted on giving him and Mrs. HOCKEY a farewell dance…..
…..
The following ladies and gentlemen were present:
Mr. & Mrs. S.J.HART, Major & Mrs. J.R. HART, Mr.& Mrs. C.De WILTON SMITH, Mr. & Mrs. H. BROWN Snr, Mr.& Mrs. C. FULLER, Mr.& Mrs. J. KING, Mr & Misses (2) TWEEDIE, Mr. & Misses (2) KEYS, Mr. E.H. BROWN and Misses BROWN (2), The Misses BATES, GRONOW, IMPEY, SMITH, A.SMITH, HOCKEY, MOONEY, BROWN, BIAS, MILLER, K.MILLER, D.MILLER, HART, L.HART, SLATER and STUBBS; the Messrs. H.W.BROWNE, C. FROST, P.HART, W.A.HART, F. HARLEY, J.HUGHES, W.KELLY, J.MILLER, C.MILLER, A.MILLER, Cliff MILLER, J.MITCHELL, M.HOWARD, G.W.KING, T.C.STUBBS and C.L.SEARLE.

GILLINGS is not dead yet

Thursday 23 May 1889

NOTICE
J.P.GILLINGS begs to inform the public that he intends to leave Cathcart at the end of June. J.P.G. asks his friends and customers who have any repairs &c to bring hem and have them seen to while they wait in town. JPG has on hand all stock of watches, jewellery &c which he is now selling at under cost prices to clear; inspection invited. All accounts must be paid by the 10th June otherwise they will be handed over for collection without further notice. All repairs left with JPG must be called for by June 20th 1889 or they will be sold on the next sale to defray expenses.
FOR SALE J.P.GILLING’s well known pony “Midnight”, rising six years guaranteed sound.

Thursday 30 May 1889

NOTICE
I beg to give notice that all roads not marked on my diagram will be CLOSED from this date and that all persons using them will be prosecuted for trespass. All dogs will be shot.
Jas. HOBBS
Cullein, Thomas River
April 25 1889

Died at Whittlesea on 15th May 1889 (from inflammation of the lungs and bronchitis) Ruben Ayliff, 6th son of John W. and Miriam FORRESTER, aged 2 years 1 month and 25 days.

Marriage at St.Marys Johannesburg on Wednesday 24th April 1889 by the Rev J.T.DARRAGH, Charles Ernest George CUMINGS, eldest son of A.C.CUMINGS Esq CE FSA, Harrow on the Hill, England, to Lilian Sophia (Lily), eldest daughter of W. PERKS Esq, Johannesburg. No cards.

Marriage at Thomas River on 22 April 1889 by the Rev.PARNELL, F.A.VINCENT Esq, Sub Inspector, Cape Police, to Clara, youngest daughter of Fanny and Richard JESSON, late of Wolverhampton, England. No cards.

GILLINGS will be glad to see his friends and their watches any day between the hours of 9 and 5. He is ready to sell a new watch or repair an old one. Don’t forget the address, J.P.GILLINGS, watchmaker, Main Street, Cathcart

Thursday 20 June 1889

Died at Underchurch, District of Cathcart on May 28th, Arthur Hopkins, second son of Bertram H. and Florence L. HARTLEY, aged 1 year 1 month and 11 days

Died at Waku o Tuesday June 4th, William Robertson, eldest son of Robert and Catherine COLVILLE (late of Miles Mark, Dunfermline, Fifeshire, Scotland) aged 22 years and 4 months. The parents of the deceased take this opportunity of returning their sincere thanks to Mrs. PRESTON, Mr.POTE, Mrs.BRUNSFIELD, Mr.& Mrs. GRANT and Corporal BERRANGE for their kindness and sympathy.

Thursday 27 June 1889

Married on the 26th June 1889 at All Saints King William’s Town by the Ven Archdeacon KITTON, John Henry BRYANT, eldest son of the late J.H.BRYANT (Surveyor General of British Kaffraria) to Martha A. HEWETSON, eldest daughter of Wallace HEWETSON of King William’s Town

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