PARKER, William, 1820 Settler

National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 27

[To the Rt.Hon. N VANSITTERT, Chancellor of the Exchequer]

Passage West, Ireland

22nd July 1819

Sir,

Having always considered the Cape of Good Hope, from its geographical situation, the salubrity of its climate and the fertility of its soil, as the most valuable acquisition to Great Britain, it has afforded me much satisfaction that you now so laudably, humanely and patriotically turn your attention to the extension of the population and internal improvement of this important colony.

The debates in Parliament on the 12th inst embolden me to address to you a few lines on this subject, which under your protecting hand is so eminently calculated to afford considerable relief to numerous unemployed people, who at present lead a life almost of hopeless misery.

I had for a long time strong expectations that the waste Bog and Mere Lands in Ireland which were surveyed under the authority of Parliament would before this have been appropriated for the employment of the Irish Poor. But having read with much attention the Reports of the Commissioners and as none of these unproductive surfaces are the property of the Crown I fear that insuperable difficulties impede their immediate conversion to this humane purpose. Much time must elapse before the general disposition of their proprietors could be converted to agricultural purposes.

Destitute of capital as Ireland is, impoverished as the resident inhabitants are and the insidious drain of the produce of the soil by absentees, it is almost impossible that industry can flourish in a country situated as this is; therefore so may will gladly seize the opportunity offered by Government of emigrating to the Cape.

I have seen in the London papers of the 17th inst the outlines of the Plan for Emigration. These appear to be wise and necessary but I must fear that those with whom emigration is almost the only pass cannot avail themselves of the proposed favour under the proposed limitations, especially from Ireland. Idleness and consequent poverty have reduced so many to absolute starvation that their substance is exhausted and their persons emaciated. Hundreds spend the most anxious moments of suspense as to their future destinies. They are patient and loyal under their sufferings, while they are taught by their more fortunate neighbours to place confidence in the paternal solicitude of Government.

Engaged as I have largely been in commercial and agricultural pursuits I was in the habit of affording employment to hundreds of people in the City of Cork and in this place, the residence of my ancestors for over a century. I have expended considerable sums of money in valuable buildings which the operation of the Orders in Council in 1810 or 1811 has nearly rendered of little or no value to me at present, although the Commissioners of the Customs in Ireland have been desirous to obtain as part of my concerns for the establishment of a Revenue Department in this place.

Having as an elector of the City and County of Cork always supported, and with some effect, the candidates for their representation in the interest of the present administration I have candidly written and told my mind to my friends, Rt.Hon. Sir N. COLTHURST and my near relative Sir J.B. MARTIN, and as my severe and extensive losses, exceeding thirty thousand pounds, were mainly caused by the Orders in Council before referred to, I have urged the two former to intervene with Government in my behalf and in case of the Island of Cuba being ceded to Great Britain to solicit my being appointed to the Master of the Havannah.

I was induced to make this application during my commercial pursuits, I had occasion to reside for about four years in several of the West India Islands where I obtained a very general knowledge of the colonial system. The parliamentary friends alluded to have informed me that they have made the application, as I pointed out, through the medium of Mr. RICE, whose influence with Government must be as considerable as his talents are eminent and valuable.

Although the cession of Cuba appears as yet as a speculation of the Newspapers, still those acquainted with the West Indies must consider it being annexed to Great Britain as the last bulwark of our sugar colonies, particularly of the Island of Jamaica. In part from the spirit of ambition lately shown by the United States it may be fairly anticipated that if Cuba does not belong to England many years will not elapse before it is possessed by America. Whether any negotiation be afoot or not on this subject it is impossible for me to know. But if there be no prospect of a cession of Cuba I shall have no hesitation in offering my services to His Majesty's Government, which I now beg leave to do, through you, to take charge of a colony of settlers from Ireland for the Southern Coast of Africa. In this place I can readily get 500 persons who would gladly embark under the auspices of Government and my personal care. Many of these are able bodied men such as house and ship carpenters, ropemakers, blockmakers, smiths, nailers, sawyers, masons &c but the largest proportion would be agricultural labourers or watermen, who have served in the Yeomanry under my brother's and my command. These men, from a previous use of arms, would assist in forming an efficient Colonial Militia, for the protection of any new settlement is an object which His Majesty's Government must deem of infinite importance in such a colony as the Cape, and which may strongly influence the personages to whom you may be pleased to refer this letter to pay every attention to my communication.

Inured as I am to a tropical climate, brought up to the most active industry, almost of an encyclopaedical nature, such as may be valuable in a new colony, I may not be deemed unfit to be selected by His Majesty's Government to take charge of settlers from Ireland for the proposed Establishment at the Cape, where it must be the earnest desire of Ministers to introduce a system of morality as the best protection to industry and the future guarantee of the prospering of the colony.

Grievously as I have suffered from the operation of the Orders in Council, without troubling either Government or Parliament with Petitions which many recommended me to submit, I humbly presume to state that I have a strong claim, not only to be favoured with your commiseration but your generous and liberal confidence, as the humane and enlightened manager of the proposed Plan.

From time immemorial my family have fought and bled for their king and country. My uncle Colonel PARKER fell in action in India in the command of a detachment of the British Army at Bombay, and my brother Captain PARKER of the Navy lost his life, with his crew, in the command of Le Viper Sloop of War open in the act of reconnoitring the French Fleet off Bantry Bay in the awful winter of 1796.

You have already honoured me with your correspondence and thanks for my own personal exertions in developing the abuses practised in Irish Grand Jury Presentiments. My Lords LIVERPOOL, CHICHESTER, and LANSDOWNE have done the same, as well as Mr. PEEL and Mr. FITZGERALD in the most gratifying terms.

I have lately devoted much of my time to enquiries into the alarming state of the Irish Poor, towards whom you have been personally kind.

When you were in Ireland Mr HAWTHORNE did me the favour of consulting me respecting the Window Tax, and I have strong reasons to think from that gentleman's communications that my answers to his letters were pleasing both to you and to him, as my advice was followed. Mr. HOW informed me at this period that he expected you at his seat at Connemara and requested that I would meet you there, that I would have an opportunity of conversing with you on those local topics to which I paid so much attention. It was not my good fortune that you should visit the South of Ireland, a circumstance which I deeply regretted, as I was deprived of the honour of an interview with you, which I had hopes may have produced good.

As I was proceeding to submit this detail to your kind, serious and prompt consideration I received a letter from my near relative the Constable of the Navy who states that he made the minutest inquiries in the best channels as to the cession of Cuba and that the report of its transfer had no foundation in truth. He therefore recommended my losing no time to provide some other situation besides that which was the object of my researches. His answer has fully confirmed me in this respectful appeal to your consideration.

My immediate family consists of a wife of one of the first connections in this county, three daughters and three sons, Mrs. PARKER and my two eldest daughters the only part of my family grown up, and perfectly content to share my fortunes in any climate I may determine to go to. If under my present circumstances it pleased God to remove me from this varied scene, their means of support would be extremely limited – a painful consideration which grieves me to the heart and embitters all my moments. But why should I, a perfect stranger to you Sir, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, trouble you with such a private detail. My answer should be candid and simple because your acknowledged humanity and the high respect you pay to the interests of Religion and the social virtues embolden me to apply directly to the fountainhead, the mover of the Plan in the House of Commons.

You have now before you a brief account of a man in the 42nd year of his age who has mixed in the first society and is most respectably, if not highly connected, who has experienced many vicissitudes of life but who still thank God possesses sufficient energies of mind and body, if aided by your patronage, of rendering important services, not only to himself but to his king, country and that Government which may take him under its countenance – one who has not despaired amidst the greatest misfortunes, but who trusting in an Omniscient Providence and in the kind consideration of Government hopes to be relieved by its instrumentality of what he fondly trusts are unmerited distresses.

The present Lord Mayor Mr ATKINS has been an old correspondent of mine. I beg leave to refer you to his Lordship and Sir J.B. MARTIN as to their knowledge of me and my connections.

Should your answer be propitious I shall have the honour of waiting on you at Downing Street to make the necessary arrangements and I flatter myself that I can take such letters from Mr. HOW and Sir N. COLTHURST and were it necessary from many of the nobility, as will entitle me to be favoured with your distinguished support in the proposal which I now take leave to submit to your consideration.

This application to your, Sir, is not only deeply interesting to me but to many respectable individuals inclined to be the companions of my voyage and partakers of my future fortunes. As such let me earnestly entreat that it will elicit your personal attention.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your most obedient and very humble st.

Wm. PARKER

I take leave to inclose a letter for the Lord Mayor apprizing his Lordship of this application to you. I also take the liberty to request your perusal of my Plea for the Poor and Industrious

[note from GOULBURN across bottom of final page]

Acknowledge receipt of his letter transmitted by Mr. VANSITTART and acquaint him that there is no intention of approaching persons to superintend the embarkation or to take charge of settlers proceeding to the Cape, but in the event of his being disposed to proceed thither inclose him a copy of the printed letter which specifies the only conditions under which Govt. give encouragement to emigration to that settlement.

 

[Transcriber's Note: Captain Henry Harding PARKER and his ship HMS Viper were lost on 2 Jan 1797 after engaging the French fleet, which was attempting to land insurrectionists in Ireland.]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 92

Passage West

Friday 5th August 1819

My Lord,

I have had the honour to receive a letter this day from Mr. VANSITTART of the 29th ult on the subject of the proposed emigration to the Cape of Good Hope, wherein he states that he should not fail to transmit to your Lordship the documents which I have sent him, as the arrangements for the proposed colonization were considered your case.

Having paid great, almost unremitting, attention to the state of the Poor in Ireland I have tendered my services to take charge of one of the proposed colonies. On this subject I have received the most valuable information from my friend Sir Josias ROWLEY and through him from Mr. Wm. WALKER, Master of HM Brig Dispatch, who surveyed the Knysna last year and brought from its shores a cargo of timber to Deptford Dock Yard.

The interesting and I will add the important details which have thus reached me make me desirous to use every exertion to aid the benevolent views of His Majesty's Government in which your Lordship is to take such an active and prominent part.

Deeply interested, as a husband and father of six children, in the success of this arduous enterprize I feel called on to unite firmness with forethought and to call into action all the exigencies of body and mind to insure success to my humble exertions.

Having for many years laboured and with some success in bettering the condition of the Poor in Ireland I have had frequent occasions to communicate with the Irish Government, and I am happy to state that the distinguished Personages who swayed the viceregal powers in Ireland paid the most marked attention to my suggestions and with a promptness highly honourable to their humanity. Thus emboldened, I have taken a wider range of the importance of the proposed emigration than perhaps most other individuals in this country.

My friend Sir J.B. MARTIN most probably has had an interview with your Lordship before this. I have also solicited him to have an interview with Mr. BARROW, whose trades in South Africa are likely to render such important services to the proposed adventurers. Indeed so valuable do I consider Mr. BARROW's research that I have without any introduction taken the liberty to address to him two letters developing my views and soliciting the kindness of his advice.

As I propose having an interview next with His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant on my way to London, you will particularly oblige me by having the goodness to inclose any communication with which your Lordship may please to favour me under cover to Wm. GREGORY Esq, Castle Dublin.

In this town, my family residence for over a century, there are a number of helpless widows and orphans of seamen and mechanics whose life is a burthen to them in their present deplorable condition, as they are not only destitute of clothing but almost of food, without resorting to begging or crime.

As food is to be had in abundance on the salubrious and fertile shores of Southern Africa, and as the raw materials for clothing almost spontaneously grow there, it has appeared to me that by a little timely precaution and the aid of the humane that some of these distressed individuals may be prevented continuing a prey to despondency and to despair,

I have mentioned my ideas to several of my friends, some of whom are active Governors of the Charitable Institutions in Cork. I have therefore addressed two letters, one to the Governors of the Foundling Hospital, of which if time permits I shall inclose your Lordship copies.

These will show you how zealous I am in humble but I trust not ineffectual exertions to do good. I propose on Monday next going to Waterford, Kilkenny and Dublin. From thence I propose visiting my friend CLAYTON at Worthington Hall, where I hope to obtain valuable information from that distinguished agriculturalist and philanthropist.

Should Sir Nicholas COLTHURST be in London on his way to the Continent your Lordship will do me a particular favour if you will have an interview with our truly benevolent City member. He will more largely enter into this subject than I can do by correspondence, should not the charge he contemplates compel him to fly from all other concerns. His absence from the United Kingdom at a crisis so interesting to me I consider a serious loss, as I place great confidence in the sincerity of his personal friendship for me and his ardent desire to do good.

As clothing and implements of husbandry, manufactures and defence are the main articles to be procured in the United Kingdom, it is my intention to provide a large supply of clothing &c for the settlers, that they should not become dependant on Cape Town. In this necessary object I have some idea of visiting Carlisle, Leeds, Sheffield and Birmingham and if on my way through these places I can be instrumental in promoting the laudable object now so interesting to Government and to the Public I shall be most happy to do so, and request that your Lordship may command my best services.

I have the honour to be my Lord with much respect

Your most obedient humble servant

Wm. PARKER

The widows who are likely to emigrate will be under 45 years of age and would assist in the cultivation of the vines of flax and hemp besides manufacturing the two latter into clothing for the colonists and the army. Present exertion when aided by the protecting hands of Government directed by such efficient and humane individuals as the Secretary for the Colonies and the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

[Transcriber's Note: The properties of Adlington and Worthington were passed by descent to members of the CLAYTON family, most notable among whom were Richard CLAYTON, who became Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas in Ireland from 1765 until his death in 1770, and another Richard CLAYTON, who studied law and served as Recorder of Wigan 1815 - 1828, Constable of Lancaster Castle and British Consul at Nantes. He was also a noted translator with many published works to his credit.]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 96

[Enclosed with the above letter. A copy written in a different hand, possibly his wife or daughter's]

To the Governors of the House of Industry of the City of Cork

Passage West

August 1819

My Lord and Gentlemen,

The alarming situation of the poor in Ireland having for a series of years attracted my most serious attention, I have exerted all the means within my reach in endeavours to better their condition. In the progress of this undertaking I have been honoured with the constant correspondence and communications of some of the most eminent philanthropists, both in and out of Parliament. These bid me to devise a plan of rural asylums for each Barony or Union of Parishes, to be placed under the immediate primary control of the Grand Juries at Assizes and under the management of Local Committees. Such establishments would prevent as has been humanely expressed by Dr. PERCEVAL of Dublin the miseries of the country being visited on the towns as the poor of their several districts could be employed and fed “where provisions grow and are consequently cheapest”. Although my suggestions met the approbation of many competent individuals of the first characters who exerted themselves in the cause of suffering humanity, the extent of the funds required for carrying them into execution and the dread of increasing the evils of idleness, when anything like a National Support was provided for the helplessness of infancy and old age, have retarded, I will not say totally prevented, my plan being acted on.

His Majesty's Ministers having proposed to encourage emigration to the Cape of Good Hope, and a Parliamentary grant having been made for that purpose, as no employment is for a while likely to be provided at home for our able bodied poor, it is fortunate that such an extensive field offers for it under the immediate auspices of Government on the salubrious and fertile shores of Southern Africa.

The general peace which so happily prevails throughout the wide expanse of the British dominions is most favourable to the happy establishment of new colonies under wise and humane regulation. Therefore after the most serious deliberation and receiving the most satisfactory accounts I have tendered my services to the British Government to conduct a colony from Ireland to the South East Coast of Africa to a climate not inferior to Italy and to a soil highly luxuriant and fertile.

Anxious that the able bodied and moral poor of the south of Ireland should benefit from my exertions I take leave to inform you of this circumstance and to suggest that as Government propose that the able parochial poor in England should be aided by the respective parishes to emigrate, measures may be adopted to relieve your establishment, the vast utility of which has been so amply proved, from a part of its numerous inmates; provided such individuals could be selected, willing to emigrate and not labouring under physical or moral disabilities.

I have submitted this proposition in a general way to the Irish Government, and as I propose having an immediate interview with them on the subject of my enterprize I take leave to submit to your prompt consideration the propriety of your ascertaining the number of able bodied persons and healthy children over 14 years of age, who have had the smallpox, hooping cough and meazles, as may be inclined to embark in the month of October or November for the Cape of Good Hope under the regulations approved of by Government. It is extremely desirable that the number of this description in the different Public Charities through Ireland should be accurately ascertained that the necessary ways and means should be timely provided and particularly as local subscriptions must be entered into to give a similar assistance to the Irish Poor to emigrate as the English Parishes are authorized to do from their funds.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 98/100

Passage West, Ireland

6th August 1819

Mr. W. PARKER presents his most respectful compliments to Lord BATHURST & takes leave to inclose his Lordship a copy of a letter to the Governors of the Foundling Hospital in Cork on the subject of the proposed emigration to the Cape of Good Hope.

To the Governors of the Foundling Hospital in the City of Cork

My Lords and Gentlemen,

Having as a Ship Owner taken from your establishment several boys as apprentices to the sea, and as it is extremely difficult during the present circumscribed state of commerce to procure situations for the children in Public Establishments, many of whom are unavoidably continued in them beyond the age prescribed for apprenticing them, I beg leave to call your attention to the Plan of Emigration to the Cape of Good Hope proposed by Government and now in progress of being carried into effect. I have tendered my services to His Majesty's Ministers on the occasion of which the inclosed copy of my letter to the Governors of the House of Industry will more fully inform you.

I have proposed that a number of boys and girls from the Public Charities in Ireland should be provided with means to emigrate under the special care of the Director, Clergyman and Physician of the colony where on their being located they should be apprenticed to such industrious farmers, artisans and mechanics of good moral character as the Director &c approved.

This system was successfully acted on by the Dutch Government on the first settlement of the Cape, the most respectable inhabitants of which are the children sent from the Orphan Schools in Holland.

I wish to call your early attention to this suggestion that you may ascertain the number of children over 14 years of age, who have had the smallpox meazles and hooping cough, who may be disposed to volunteer under my immediate care. The Physician or Surgeon who may accompany me will be instructed to examine minutely each boy and girl and to reject any that could not be embarked under every fair prospect of future success.

I shall arrange either in Dublin or London the selection of proper Masters and Mistresses from the most approved Societies to take care of the childrens health and more to preserve the benefits of their early education and to instruct the rising generation of the colonists and if possible of the Natives.

Every precaution which human forethought can [demand] under the direction of the most enlightened philanthropists in Great Britain and Ireland shall be adopted and as means will permit to insure the happiness of the inhabitants of the New Colony. In a climate where the vine, the olive and the mulberry flourish, where hemp, flax and cotton grow in a natural state, where food is in abundance, human industry aided by morality is alone sufficient to render its people happy. I take leave to submit this letter to your most humane and serious consideration that you may take the necessary steps in time to promote the interests of so many children under your fostering care, and that if necessary the approbation of Government may be procured for sanctioning an advance of your funds on this occasion.

Be so good as to inclose your answer under cover to Wm. GREGORY Esq, Castle Dublin

I have the honour to be my Lords and Gentlemen

Your very obedient humble servant

Copy

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 120

Passage West, Ireland

11th August 1819

Sir,

I have had the honour to receive your letter of the 3rd inst with the inclosed circular on the subject of emigration to the Cape of Good Hope.

In this parish and the neighbourhood of Cork there is a vast redundant population whose lives are a burthen to themselves and a dead weight on society.

The sixth paragraph in the circular letter appears to me to apply to this particular description of persons, from which it is generally supposed to be the humane wish of Government to relieve the country. A strong feeling has been already shown in Cork by many respectable individuals to assist their emigration which may ultimately save the country from the enormous expense of their transportation as criminals – the records of our criminal courts fully proving that hundreds are forced to commit crimes to support a wretched existence.

But these are not the class of persons likely to reward an enterprizing individual by their useful labours and certainly not such as I should select. Nevertheless they are such persons for whom, were it possible, Government should provide means for emigrating and where it is more the duty of the state than of an individual to relieve.

However considerably over 100 families, the heads of which are all men possessing bodily and mental energies, freely volunteering to be the companions of my enterprize and to place themselves under my particular care. I shall therefore be perfectly satisfied to make such arrangements with them as Government may approve, provided they can empower me when located in the colony to enforce their several contracts.

The undertaking is arduous but I trust that I possess sufficient fortitude and patience to be prepared to meet with difficulties and with the blessing of God to insure success.

Thus circumstanced I shall proceed to Waterford, Dublin and Belfast, then cross over to visit my friend Mr. CLAYTON at Worthington Hall, where you will most oblige me by addressing your answer to this letter.

My Parliamentary friends have come forward with tenders of their services and although policy may influence the Colonial Department to state, as you have done in your letter to me, that there exists no intention to appoint persons to take charge of bodies of settlers to the Cape of Good Hope and to superintend their proceedings, I am perfectly satisfied that His Majesty's Ministers will not leave these persons to create their own ruin, which would be the case unless “some intelligent individual” as the circular letter specifies should direct their industry and provide for their multiform wants.

What the [obscured] PAYNE? and Mr.BARROW have written are conclusive on these points. The present state of Society in the South East of Africa does not sanction a number of destitute individuals to be cast dependent and almost destitute on its shores remote from Cape Town without some director or head.

When Sir J.B. MARTIN and Mr. BARROW have an interview with my Lord BATHURST his Lordship will probably be inclined to allude to my suggestions.

My views lead me to form a settlement on the sea coast for the purpose of commerce and I have stated such facts as may incline the Colonial Department to secure me a grant of land on the Knysna. I have the honour to be, Sir, with much respect

Your very obedient servant

Wm. PARKER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 147

Greshams Hotel

Sackville Street

Dublin

Friday 20th August 1819

Mr. W. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. GOULBURN, takes leave to inform him for the information of Earl BATHURST that he has arrived from Cork in this City on his way to London, in order to enter into arrangements with the Colonial Department for the removal of a number of settlers from Cork Harbour to the Territories of the Cape of Good Hope.

On the special recommendation of Mr. GRANT, Mr. PARKER waits for the honour of an interview with His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant in Tuesday next, as Mr. GRANT has assured him that Earl TALBOT is interested in the success of his arduous enterprize.

Mr. GRANT has been so kind as to offer Mr. PARKER particular letters of introduction to Mr. GOULBURN, he therefore trusts that his delay in Dublin until Tuesday next will not operate to his prejudice in the very important arrangements so necessary to enter into at Downing Street.

Mr. PARKER has had a long interview with Sir George BE....? whom he particularly consulted respecting the establishment of a Colonial Militia at the Cape, which would be so necessary for the defence of the new settlers. “Your residence in the West Indies and your experience as a Yeomanry Officer, says Sir George, must induce Government to pay particular attention to your spirited proposition. When your arrangements are made in London, says Sir George, you will find no difficulty in procuring the necessary Military Stores in Ireland should Government think proper to order them for the defence of the settlers.

 

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 155

Greshams Hotel

Dublin

Monday 23rd August 1819

Mr. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. GOULBURN, takes leave to acknowledge receipt of his letter of the 13th inst transmitted from Passage West and that he hopes to have the honour of paying his personal respects in Downing Street by the latter end of the week, with letters of introduction to Mr. GOULBURN from Mr. GRANT and Mr. SNEYD.

Mr. PARKER is pleased to find from Mr. GOULBURN's letters that a part of Mr. P's plan of emigration from Ireland is considered desirable. When Mr. PARKER has the honour of an interview with Lord BATHURST and Mr. GOULBURN he flatters himself that his experience and qualifications will give him some claim on their distinguished support.

Mr. PARKER has written to Mr. PEEL to Drayton Park and from Mr. P[obscured] communications to him when [Secretary] for Ireland he calculates on [obscured] his countenance on the arduous enterprize in which he is engaged.

[note from GOULBURN on back of envelope:

What can we say to this pompous gentleman who has already so completely worn out Mr. VANSITTERT by letter that Mr. V has determined on refusing to see him.]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 175

Crown Hotel

1st September 1819

Mr. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. GOULBURN and will do himself the honour of waiting on him on Tuesday next at 12 o'clock agreeably to Mr. GOULBURN's appointment.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 177

Crown Hotel, Strand

3rd September 1819

Sir,

In submitting through you to Lord BATHURST's consideration certain conditions relative to the proposed emigration of myself, family and large body of settlers from Cork Harbour to the Cape of Good Hope, I feel called on to introduce these conditions which I have no doubt will meet his Lordships approbation.

The letters of introduction which I have had the honour to procure to Mr. VANSITTART, Lords HANDLY and CASTLEREAGH and to yourself from Mr. GRANT as the Organ of the Irish Government, accompanied with the high testimonials of my public and private character contained in these letters, embolden me to address the Colonial Department with some degree of confidence and with a humble hope that my past services in the cause of my King, Country and of suffering humanity will meet all due attention from his Lordship and yourself.

I removed with my family to a tropical climate and respectably if not highly connected I do not appear before you in the light of an ordinary emigrant but as an individual of considerable experience and knowledge of [men?] and things, and more particularly as a patient and loyal sufferer from the operation of public occurrences and especially from the Orders in Council in 1810 or 1811, which deprived me and my friends of a very considerable property, a fact well known to my Lord LIVERPOOL and painfully distressing to me, as a husband and a father.

I have a very general knowledge of the Colonial System having had when in the West Indies frequent confidential interviews with the Governors of most of the islands, in whose society I spent much of my time.

The anomalous state of the Colonial Government of the Cape will no doubt shortly become an object of the serious consideration of His Majesty's Ministers, and a system of jurisprudence will most probably be introduced, more in unison with the benign principles of the British Constitution and more consonant with the dignity of Freemen. When this happy event tales place the administration of Justice will be attended with less difficulty and will be placed in the hands of enlightened Lawyers and competent Juries. But until this happens great precautions are required in the selection of Landrosts and Council, whose powers appear to me so undefined.

Should my Lord BATHURST be disposed to make any arrangements with me there will be no necessity for any departure of much moment from the official letters issued by the Colonial Department and which are so creditable to the humanity of His Majesty's Government.

But as my views are of an embracing and comprehensive nature, uniting commercial and agricultural pursuits, experience and misfortune have given me a considerable knowledge, I do trust that his Lordship will deem me deserving of a special grant of a part of those occupied lands on the banks of the Knysna, and that he will be pleased to facilitate my negotiations with Mr. George REX of Milkwood Kraal [Melkhoutkraal]* for the purchase of the farm of Eastford which appears on the map and is represented to me as being the [ideal?] situation for a Town. This Town I shall most respectfully solicit His Royal Highness the Prince Regent to name New Cork, as the harbour of the Knysna bears so strong a resemblance to that of my native city, and as the Town will I hope become populous under the auspices of the British Government and the industry of the natives of Ireland.

The number of highly respectable individuals willing to embark with me and under my direction give me some additional claim to Lord BATHURST's consideration. Several Naval and Military Officers, a Clergyman of the Established Church highly recommended will cooperate with me and form a loyal and efficient Council to aid me in cases of emergency and to enforce order and good conduct among the Colonists. With such assistance and with the superior help of Religion, Morality and Industry I place humble confidence under God and the protection of the British Government and I hope to see in a few years a flourishing colony on the South East Coast of Africa affording an extensive asylum to our redundant population at home and adding to the strength and revenues if the British Empire.

These are my views and I hope that they will not be considered erroneous but that they will merit the distinguished notice of Lord BATHURST.

Having when in Dublin fully explained myself to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland on this subject it was most gratifying to me to find that His Excellency cordially approved of my enterprize and expressed himself through the Chief Secretary disposed to afford me every assistance which His Majesty's Ministers approved of and which the great poverty of the Irish settlers mainly arising from the effects of the late contagious disease so particularly required.

It may not be irrelevant to state that Mr. Serjeant BARTON told me in Dublin that he never saw any place better calculated to prevent the growth of pauperism and crime than the emigration now agitated. As employment cannot be found at home for our redundant population “it is a happy circumstance” says the learned serjeant “that it can be found abroad. Were there a chain of gaols and penitentiaries extending throughout Ireland it would be impossible to prevent crime as long as the people had no honest means of existence.”

This opinion, which I will venture to confirm, is that of all the Irish Judges, will no doubt have due weight - ask my Lord BATHURST, and it will operate with the Irish Government to aid the settlers with a grant of the necessary arms, ammunitions, tents &c and for which the voluntary and loyal services of so many individuals in the Irish Yeomanry give them a strong claim.

As an officer of the Yeomanry I pledge myself to organise all the male adults in the new colony into a respectable Regiment of Militia to aid in the guard protection of the settlement and give local confidence amongst the inhabitants of the district. In submitting this proposition I trust that I do an act of service to my country, as such a corps, unpaid, embodied for self defence and always on the alert, would strike the neighbouring savages with awe, and prevent such scenes occurring as happened at the Knysna in 1799 and which have acted on the borders of the Witte River this present year.

The vast importance of the subject, and the interest of so many individuals for whom I am the agent, require on my part the fullest and most satisfactory explanations – that no false hopes, no enthusiastic idea of success should henceforth cause discontent, dissatisfaction and distress amongst the colonists.

Mr. GRANT and Mr. SNEYD said “let your business be well arranged in London, let Government fully know your views and expectations, let them honour you with their confidence and success must crown your laudable exertions.”

Having now done so, I take leave most respectfully to submit the accompanying proposals for My Lord BATHURSTs favourable consideration. I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient and very humble servant

Wm. PARKER

*[Transcriber's Note: George REX, rumoured to be the illegitimate son of George III, purchased the estate of Melkhoutskraal (Milkwood) in 1804. "As time went on the 'grand seigneur' (George REX) at Melkhout Kraal expanded his agricultural activities and eventually became the largest landowner along the coast between Table Bay and Algoa Bay. Into his possession, by purchase from their Dutch owners, came Welbedacht, Sandkraal, Uitzigt (now known as Eastford, Westford and Brenton-Belvidere respectively). All these, with Melkhout Kraal, the present day Hunters Home and Woodbourne, circled the Knysna lagoon.” From ‘Timber and Tides' by Winifred Tapson]

[Attached to above letter]

Conditions which Mr. PARKER has the honour to submit to Earl BATHURST's consideration for taking charge of a body of settlers from Cork Harbour for the South East Coast of Africa, pursuant to the late Parliamentary grant and in conformity to the Regulations of the Colonial Department.

1st That a grant of land shall be made to each head of families and all adults eighteen years of age and upwards at the rate of 100 acres, agreeably to the circular letter of August 1819, and that Mr. PARKER shall have power to article to him for three years such a number of tradesmen, mechanics and agricultural labourers not exceeding 100, for each of which he is to obtain a grant of land, such as may be unlocated or in the hands of Government on the banks of the River Knysna, and such as Mr. PARKER may solicit on his arrival and that in consequence of the lately alleged scarcity of provisions at Cape Town and its territories he shall be allowed two years for completing his compliment of 100 families of male adults so that he may render his selection of lands as convenient as circumstances will admit.

2. That the Colonial Government at the Cape of Good Hope do take special care that Mr. PARKER [fully?] performs ant contract he may enter into with his party of settlers and that their services shall be secured to him in [writing?] of such legal agreements as he may enter into with them, previous to embarking, and that in order to give mutual security to the contracting parties duplicates of each individual agreement shall be furnished to every person embarking being first countersigned and duly witnessed by the clergyman, physician or surgeon, or other respectable settler going out.

3. That as several of the Public Charities in Ireland are heavily encumbered with a number of grown up boys and girls of fourteen years and upwards, that should Mr. PARKER be disposed to take any of them as apprentices for agricultural or other purposes he shall obtain grants of land for each individual at the rate of fifty acres, the said land to be at a short distance from the banks of the Knysna and as contiguous to the Town as circumstances will admit.

4. That the unarticled settlers who may choose to go under Mr. PARKER's direction shall be totally free from his interference in their private pursuits. But that all who go to the district of the Knysna shall consider him as the confidential superintendent thereof.

5. That Mr. PARKER be appointed Colonial Commandant of the Colonial Militia of the Knysna with full powers for the first seven years of appointing the Officers of the Regiment.

6. That it is understood the Officers and Privates of said Militia shall serve without pay and be subject to such rules and regulations as the Colonial Government acting on behalf of His Majesty may think proper to order. But that all due consideration be made by the Government for the voluntary services of such a corps so that they shall not be harassed with unnecessary duty.

7. That in case of vacancy the Privates of said Regiment of Militia after the lapse of seven years shall have the power of electing their own officers (as was the case in the Irish Yeomanry) with the excepting of the Colonial Commandant, who shall be appointed in case of Mr. PARKER's death, resignation or removal by the Government of the Cape.

8. That in case of the death, resignation or removal of George VANKERVAL Esq, the present Landrost or Sheriff of the District of George Town, Mr. PARKER be appointed his successor if it be not deemed expedient to separate the District of George Town from that of the Knysna, the harbour of which is near 50 miles distant from the former. In case of such separation Mr. PARKER shall be appointed Landrost with the usual salary and allowances made by the colony to the other Landrosts.

9. That as the Irish Government had given an assurance to Mr. PARKER of its cordially assisting him with a proportion of military stores, arms and ammunition, from the Irish Establishment, that such quantities as the Commander of Forces in Ireland may approve shall be shipped on board one of the transports, either at Dublin or Cork, for the Knysna, for the protection and accommodation of the colonists.

10. That as the timber of the forests of the Knysna after trial in Deptford Dock Yard has been declared absolutely unfit for His Majesty's Naval Services, that Mr. PARKER shall have free permission to cut down any quantity he may require [in] the Government Forests, without any charge, fees or impost and to remain the same through any ways already formed or to [obscured] such new ways or aqueducts without any hindrance or molestation from any individuals connected with the Government. Provided nevertheless that Mr. PARKER makes good any damage he may do to the lands or premises of any person. And it is understood that all the settlers shall have free permission to cut down any timber they may require for their own use.

Draft of Henry GOULBURN's reply to above:

I have laid before Lord B your letter of the 3rd inst enclosing for his Lordship's consideration certain conditions under which you propose to take charge of a body of settlers and proceed to the Cape of Good Hope, and am directed to reply to assure you that his Lordship does not feel himself at liberty to admit in your case of any deviation from the conditions laid down in the printed letter under which other settlers proceed to that colony; it is not from any doubt as to your individual qualifications but from the necessity which his Lordship considers to exert for placing all the settlers in the colony on a precisely similar footing. On this ground therefore his Lordship is unable to hold out to you any expectation of your being permitted on your arrival to solicit the particular spot which you may consider most eligible for a settlement. You will of course be at liberty to make known your wishes to the Governor but it must rest with him to decide how far a compliance is consistent with the general interest of the colony.

With respect to the appointments which you have in view either as Superintendent of the Knysna, as Colonel of the Militia or as Landrost of the District of George Town, Lord B cannot enter into any engagement not does he consider it necessary to discuss your proposition with respect to the military service of the settlers, it not being in his power to [obscured] any that differ from those which are actually in force in the colony & Lord B is particularly desirous that you should have an [obscured] that as all the persons who proceed to the Cape as settlers will of course receive in common with his Majesty's other subjects in that colony all due protection and support, so they cannot be permitted to enjoy either with respect to their lands or in any other respect any immunities from which other inhabitants are debarred. For this reason the right of collecting timber on land allotted to you there is not one which Lord B has in his power to concede.

With respect to that part of your proposal which relates to the carrying out of a certain number of boys and girls from the charities in Ireland, Lord B considers that although the plan may well be deserving of future consideration it is one which he should not in the first instance be desirous of encouraging. To the other conditions specified as they in most respects conform to the regulations laid down in the printed letter Lord B has no objection, but he has desired me to add that in the event of any proposal you may make being accepted you will be at perfect liberty to make any legal agreements with the settlers under your direction which may be essential for your mutual interest & comfort.

 

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 200

Crown Hotel, Strand

Saturday 4th September 1819, 11 o'clock

Mr. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. GOULBURN, takes leave to forward him a letter which he received this Post from the Bishop of Gloucester. The number of distinguished personages in Great Britain and Ireland who take an interest in Mr. PARKER's exertions stimulate him to persevere in his arduous enterprize. He very much regrets that Mr. GOULBURN was not able from his commitments yesterday to favour him with a longer interview, which Mr. PARKER deems so essentially necessary to put Mr. GOULBURN in full possession of his views, which he will find grounded on the basis of genuine philanthropy and which induces his numerous friends to use their interest for him on one of the most important [events?] of his life. Mr. PARKER shall hold himself disengaged for any arrangements for tomorrow until he hears from Mr. GOULBURN in hopes that he may be disposed to [provide/] him with that confidential interview which the importance of his undertaking and the pressing circumstances of the proposed emigration from Ireland so evidently requires.

Note from GOULBURN across bottom:

Acquaint Mr. PARKER that although I am not aware that any confidential communication can be necessary on the subject of a proposal to emigrate to the Cape that nevertheless as he appears to entertain an different opinion I shall be happy to receive him on Tuesday next at 2 o'clock.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 216

Crown Hotel

Tuesday 14 Sept 1819

Mr PARKER presents his compliments to Mr GOULBURN takes leave to send him the copy of a letter which he received from a very eminent Irish Clergyman on the subject of the Cape Colonization, and Doctor COLQUHOUN's Pamphlet which that venerable gentleman sent him.

As Mr PARKER does not wish to be troublesome to Mr GOULBURN, he has determined to wait his and Lord BATHURST's pleasure and in order to facilitate the necessary arrangements in Ireland, Mr SHEARES, on Mr PARKER's receiving an answer to the official communication proceeds forthwith to Cork. Mr PARKER will therefore remain in London to inspect the shipment of the necessary stores.

As several of Mr PARKER's connexions are at present in the country and as some of them have promised to meet him in Town early in October, Mr PARKER has written to Mrs PARKER to join him in London.

Mr PARKER has seen a letter from the Cape stating that the Caffer Country was to be entered on the 4th July. Surely, if these savages are so persevering in their Hostility to the British as to require this step the sooner a regular Militia could be organised throughout the Colony on the same official plan as this [kind] of force in the West Indies, the greater security and consequent confidence would be among the Settlers. On this point Mr PARKER would much wish to have an interview with Earl BATHURST, when it suits his Lordships pleasure.

[Note from GOULBURN across letter]

Return W.P. his book and letter with my thanks for the communication & acquaint him that I should be very [unhappy?] to be the cause of delaying him [unnecessarily?] in London and as I am not conscious of any point which cannot be settled by correspondence as well as by personal communication, beg that he will not sacrifice his convenience for what he may consider to be either Lord B's or mine

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 218

Copy of a letter from the Revd H. TOWNSEND to Mr PARKER

Derry, Rosscarbery

4 Augt 1819

My Dear Friend

Your undertaking appears to me most judicious, and from the first time I heard of the encouragement held out for colonization at the Cape, I thought it a most wise and commendable act of Government. The question of population increasing beyond means of competent subsistence is no longer one of theory. In the last thirty years it has been practically offering itself to consideration, tho' it is but very lately that Government seems to have sincerely taken it into contemplation.

Our loyal newspapers were generally full of discouragement to migration, when if they had known the real state of the Country, they should have promoted it by every means within their power, for it is not mere numbers that constitute the strengths or prosperity of an Empire, but united, industrious and happy inhabitants. An empire crowded with people of whom many languish for want of employment and when employment cannot be given to them, must like an overgrown body contain the seeds of disorder.Male suit sua . But although spots may be overstocked the world is yet sufficiently wide, and a great nation like England cannot be at a loss how to dispose of the overflow. New South Wales offers a noble asylum, but it is objectionable from remoteness. If there was no other, necessity would oblige government to make exertions for more extensive colonisation there. Happily a country nearer home and unexceptionable as to soil and climate offers itself in their late acquisition of the Cape of Good Hope - a name which I trust will henceforth become still more appropriate. I have a good general account of it in the Edinburgh Encyclopaedia taken chiefly from BARROW. The soil is represented as generally most fertile but the mode of cultivation untested. It should therefore seem, that an improvement in this respect might turn out a source of great prospect. The nearer the coast the better, especially if the Harbour you speak of be so good. Timber is said to be scarce there, though no doubt there are many places where it would succeed if planted. Your last account states that it abounds about the Harbour of Knysna which is in the Encyclopaedia called a navigable river, and one of the few whose waters are permanent.

Some good ploughmen and carpenters would be among the prime requisites. Common labourers may be made or found anywhere that civilisation even in a rude state subsists. If you can accomplish the object proposed of getting out at the head of a strong establishment, provided with all such things and materials, as such a scheme requires, and under the protection of Government, very little capital will be required to insure ultimate success. The command of labour in such enterprises is capital sufficient, and that your numbers will enable you to have.

I would principally guard against extravagant hopes, which generally end in mortification and disappointment. Such an undertaking rather lays the foundation of future prosperity for those who come after than encourages hopes of immediate acquisition. You must therefore be prepared for some difficulties and some disappointments, and among other articles of preparation lay in a stock of patience and fortitude. I shall be extremely glad to hear how you get on in the encouragement you expect, and the provisions you are enabled to make.

Yours most truly

Hor. TOWNSEND

A few years residence at the Cape may enable you to give the public a very interesting account of its present state and capabilities of improvement with credit to yourself.

[Transcriber's note: The Rev. Horace TOWNSEND of Derry in the parish of Rosscarbery was the author of the Statistical Survey of the County of Cork]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 220

Crown Hotel

14th Sept 1819

Sir

I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 13th inst to which I hasten to reply as the period is fast approaching for the Cape of Good Hope embarkation.

In one of the circular letters, the last I believe, it is stated "that the interests and wishes of the settlers will be consulted and attended to, as far as may be consistent with the public interests of the Colony." This assurance, which does such high honor to the Colonial Department, emboldens me to solicit your reference to my [previous/former] communication with the conditions accompanying it. In these documents you will find that it is my wish to comply as far as possible with the conditions laid down in the printed circular, and that I do not solicit any special exemption in my favor, incompatible with Earl BATHURST to grant, or such as may prove the grounds of jealousy to other settlers.

But as I bring considerable commercial, nautical and agricultural experience to my aid, and as Mr Richard Benjamin SHEARES a gentleman of high respectability, property, talents and possessing some local knowledge of the Cape has associated with me, along with several other respectable individuals, it is due to them and myself that I should for the general interest avail myself of these circumstances to press, if not a special exception at home, at least a particularly strong recommendation, (which in every point of view, I should consider as valid, as a command) from Earl BATHURST to his Excellency the Governor of the Cape, requesting that the wishes of myself and settlers will be complied with, as stated in my letter and conditions of the 3rd inst, copies of which, I submit should accompany the dispatch committed to my case provided that these conditions be consistent with the public interests of the Colony.

I have that confidence in Earl BATHURST's consideration and my own devotion as a loyal subject to my King, country and the interests of Humanity, that although circumstances may prevent his Lordship entering into any engagement with me, that I should be appointed either as superintendent of the Knysna, as Colonel of the Militia, or as Landrost of the district of George Town, that I shall be perfectly satisfied at his Lordships recommending me for these appointments, should any such be deemed necessary, or should any vacancy occur.

I apprehend that you are under some misconception as to the privilege I solicited of cutting Timber in the forests of the Knysna. These are represented to me as useless possessions in the hands of the Crown. Indeed the specimens of the Timber, which I have seen at Deptford Dockyard, indicate that it was in a state of decay and unfit for any public service. In this case no possible injury could arise to the public from granting me this boon, which would enable me to employ a vast number of people in the supply of the garrison and inhabitants of Cape Town, with the article of fuel of which they so much stand in need.

Having now replied to your letter in a manner which I hope will be satisfactory to Earl BATHURST, permit me to conclude by stating, that in coinciding with the opinion of that highly respectable individual Doctor COLQUHOUN, who has honored me with his correspondence, I am fully satisfied "it will only require prudent, correct and intelligent superintendence, in order to secure success in what may be truly denominated a God like work, that of making millions of our fellow creatures happy, who are now miserable". When his Majesty's Ministers proposed the Parliamentary grant, such sentiments unquestionably operated with them. I therefore, honoured as I am with the friendship of so many distinguished Individuals, and accustomed to enquire into the misfortunes and vices of society, in all their appalling shapes, and to remove them as far as my humble means permit, I am animated with a hope that these circumstances will hereafter lead to have me considered as a person of some importance in such an extensive Colony.

Mr SHEARES only waits your answer to proceed to Ireland to enter into the necessary engagements with the settlers, and to transmit to me for the information of Lord BATHURST, correct lists of at least 200 families including in all 7 or 800 persons willing to proceed under our direction.

As my general knowledge on the subject of Emigration and Embarkation may be useful on this occasion, permit me to suggest, that the Admiral and Agent for Transport in Cork Harbour be requested to muster and examine all the Heads of families who may embark, that Government may be fully satisfied that no improper mode has been resorted to, in securing their services.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your most obedient and very humble servant

William PARKER

[Transcriber's note: Richard SHEARES was the son of Henry SHEARES. Henry and his brother John, both barristers, were hanged for treason during the Irish Rebellion of 1798, having been betrayed by a double-agent named ARMSTRONG. Today they are revered as two of the foremost Irish patriots. There is no information on Richard or any of his political affiliations.]

[Draft of Henry GOULBURN's reply to above]

I have laid before Lord B the letter which you addressed to me on the 14th inst in which you state that you do not desire any special exemption in your favor from the conditions laid down in the printed circular with respect to emigration to the Cape, but that you are anxious to receive so strong a recommendation to the Governor as should ensure on his part a compliance with the wishes which you expressed in your former letter provided they are consistent with the general interests of the Colony.

I am directed in reply to acquaint you that in the event of any proposal for proceeding as a settler to the Cape being made by you & accepted, Lord B. will readily recommend you to the Governor in terms perfectly consistent with the testimonials which you have adduced from so many respectable quarters of your respectability & qualifications and has no doubt that you will receive every favorable consideration compatible with the general interests of the Colony & the claims of other settlers. But in order to remove any erroneous impression to which such a recommendation might give rise, Lord B. is desirous that I should again explain to you before any definite proposal has been made by you that he can not hold out to you an expectation that the Govt. can confer on you any privileges not conceded to other settlers in a similar class with yourself: or that it will be possible to abandon in your favor the right of cutting timber which has been always heretofore reserved to the Crown.

I have only further to add that if it should be formally your wish to proceed to the Cape it would be desirable that I should receive from you as early as is convenient number & list of the persons whom you propose to accompany you in order that Lord B. may have your proposal under his consideration together with those many of the other persons who are equally desirous of availing themselves of the offer held out in the circular letter of the ___August

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 226

Crown Hotel

Friday 17 September 1819

Mr. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. GOULBURN, takes leave to send to him two letters received from individuals desirous to proceed under Mr. P's direction to the Cape of Good Hope. Mr. PARKER has also received a letter from Mr. Frederick CLARKE of Passage West, Ireland, the brother of the late Major General Sir Wm. CLARKE Bart., volunteering to be one of his party. This gentleman is of the first respectability. He commanded a Company of the Royal Cork Volunteers for over 20 years and he possesses great activity of mind and body and would be a useful and respectable colonist. He has two sons on the 4th Regt. of Foot, the eldest was wounded on the Peninsula, was in the Battle of Waterloo and met the distinguished notice and patronage of the Duke of WELLINGTON. Mr. CLARKE purposes taking out his wife, two daughters and his youngest son.

Mr. J. VANCOUVER, the elder brother of the celebrated Circumnavigator, although advanced in years, wishes to join Mr. PARKER. The Lords Mayor has recommended this scientific gentleman for his sound understanding and a comprehensive and enlightened mind. His years above 60 are the only obstacle to his embarking in such an arduous undertaking. But he has gone through great exercises with Mr. PARKER.

Mr. PARKER's house in Ireland is daily surrounded with a number of individuals anxious to embark and the numerous applications made to him and to which he can give no positive assurance until he hears further from Mr. GOULBURN embarrass Mr. P's arrangements in London.

Mr. P takes the liberty to send Mr. GOULBURN a small pamphlet which he procured yesterday respecting the proposed emigration. A Cork paper of Thursday last has fallen into Mr. PARKER's hands. This he takes leave to send to Mr. GOULBURN. It will [obscured] to him one of the pictures of distress in that unfortunate city, a part of which Mr.P is so truly anxious to relieve.

 

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 230

Downing Street

past 3 o'clock

Tuesday 21st September 1819

Mr. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. GOULBURN, takes leave to inclose him a copy of the Printed Articles of Agreement which he proposes between him and the settlers who are to be articled to him. This document which Mr. PARKER deems of great importance to the successful establishment of one of the new settlements he hopes will meet the approbation of Earl BATHURST and of Mr. GOULBURN.

Before any copies be [printed?] off of these articles, which Mr. PARKER wishes to have done tomorrow in order to transmit to Ireland, that no delay may ensue, he hopes that Mr. GOULBURN at his leisure will have the goodness to peruse and as soon as possible to signify whether the same be consonant with the views of the Colonial Department.

Articles of Agreement made this _________ Day of __________ in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and __________. Between _______________ of ________ on the Part, and _________ of the other Part.

Witness, That the said ____________ has entered into the service of the said ___________ in the term of ______ years from this day, on the terms and conditions hereinafter mentioned; that is to say :

              I.    That the said ___________ shall and will serve the said ______________ as a __________ At such place or places in the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope, as the said ______________ may be located at for the said term, to commence and be computed from the day of his arrival at such place or places, when the pay of the said _____________ shall commence at the rate of _________ per day, and that for every day which the said ____________ shall employ the said ____________ he shall be paid by the said ___________ and the said wages, shall also be supplied with provisions from the stores, according to the standard as fixed and allowed to the soldiers in the said Colony by Government.

             II.    That the said ___________ will permit the said _____________ to work for himself as often as the affairs of him the said ______________ may allow, on the said _____________ accounting to the said ____________ for his provisions from the stores at ________ per day.

            III.    That the working hours in each day shall be regulated by the custom of the Colony, but shall not exceed the legal working time of ten hours and an half in Great Britain.

           IV.    That such provisions as the family of the said _________ may require shall be furnished from the stores of the settlement by the said ___________ and shall be charged to the account of the said ___________ at the current price of the district in which the settlement may be established.

            V.    That in case of accident or serious ill health preventing the accustomed labor of the said ___________ he shall nevertheless receive his full allowance of provisions from the stores, and also one half of the average daily wages which he had been in the habit of earning during the six preceding weeks before the accident or illness befell him.

           VI.    That the said __________ shall have a plot of ground on the site of the town intended to be built, containing not less than one quarter of an acre for building himself a house, for which said land, and house so to be built by the said _________ a grant in perpetuity shall be made, after the expiration of seven years from the time it was located, to the said _________ his heirs, executors, administrators and assigns, by the said _____________ on payment of a yearly rent at and after the rate of two pounds sterling per acre, provided the said house be built according to a plan to be made and approved of by the Colonial Government, or the said ___________. Or the said ____________ his heirs, executors, administrators and assigns, shall have permission to take, cultivate and occupy in lieu of his town allotment, one acre of land, at a distance not exceeding -------- miles from the town, which said allotment shall from time to time be augmented, according to the ability and exertions of the said ________ until it shall ultimately contain five acres, but no more.

          VII.    That such allotment of one or more acres, not exceeding five acres, shall be granted to him in perpetuity by the said _____________ at the yearly reserved rent of two shillings sterling, British money, per acre, but such rent is not to commence until after the expiration of the first seven years, not until the first day of January or the first day of July, subsequent to the anniversary of the settlers landing or arriving at the settlement.

         VIII.    That the said _____________ shall not be entitled to receive more than one third of his wages in the money of the country, the other two thirds being supplied to him from the stores in such tools, articles of clothing or other necessaries as he may require, and for whatever balance which may be in his favor at the end of each year or quarter, a bill shall be granted to him by the said _________ to remit to his distant friends at the current exchange of the country.

           IX.    That in case the said _____________ shall neglect to build a house according to the sixth article of this agreement within the period of three years, on the plot of ground assigned to him in the town, the said plot shall be forfeited and become the absolute property of the said ___________ his heirs, administrators, or assigns.

            X.    That the said ______________ solemnly engages and binds himself to the said ___________ that he will faithfully conform to and strictly obey all rules and regulations for the maintenance of order, morality, good fellowship and good conduct, which shall be made, approved of, and recommended by the Gentlemen of the establishment consistently with the laws of God, of man, and the laws and customs of the Colony.

           XI.    That in case any dispute or altercation shall arise between the said parties, the same shall be referred to two respectable and disinterested persons, who shall have power to choose a third person as an umpire, who decision shall on all occasions be binding on the parties, and have the full force and decision of law.

          XII.    That the said ____________ shall subscribe weekly towards establishing a friendly society, with the other mechanics and labourers, for creating a fund, not only for the payment of medical assistance in case of accident or serious ill health, but for the purpose of assisting to make up the other half of the wages of which the sufferer would stand in need under any bodily hurt or temporary sickness.

         XIII.    That in case of the death of the said _____________ the said ____________ hereby binds himself to work for the heirs, executors and administrators of the said _____________ and in all things to conform himself to their orders, rules and regulations in the same manner as if the said _____________ had not departed this life.

        XIV.    That in case of the death of the said _______________ during the passage or during this contract, his family shall be entitled to a grant of five acres of land, subject to the conditions of the said seventh article.

WITNESS the hands of the parties.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 232

Crown Hotel

22 Sept 1819

Sir,

I take leave to submit to you for the consideration of Lord BATHURST a listing of 124 individuals with their families wishing to emigrate under my direction to the Cape of Good Hope. Many of these persons, from their absolute poverty are destitute of clothing and every necessary for the voyage, are willing to become articled settlers and to look to me for employment and support, of both of which they are nearly destitute in Ireland.

Mr. R.B. SHEARES, who has most cordially associated himself with me in this enterprize, proceeded to Cork on Monday night and, as he fully understands the subject, he will on his arrival there be able to furnish me with such particulars as Lord BATHURST may further require.

As a settler accompanied by 100 artificers, mechanics and labourers, I am prepared to conform to the conditions of the printed circulars. But as an individual with some pretensions from much experience, I am also ready to devote my time in promoting the general interest of the Colonial Government at the Cape of Good Hope conformably to any specific directions I may be favoured with by Lord BATHURST towards the establishment of morality, industry good order and regular conduct in the District of the Knysna, or in any other in which we may be located under the distinct understanding

that at present exists in respect to my future views and ulterior objects.

As a settler I took leave yesterday to submit to your consideration a copy of the Articles to be entered into with the individuals who may contract to serve me, and which if it meets Lord BATHURST's approbation I propose to recommend to other parties taking out settlers like myself.

It is not only my one natural desire and most earnest wish but that of my able and intelligent associate Mr SHEARES (who has been so strongly recommended by Mr. ARBUTHNOT to Lord BATHURST) to establish our operations as firmly as possible on such principles of philanthropy and fair dealing as are likely to promote good fellowship and order, without which it would be vain to expect a successful issue to the enterprize. This we trust will meet the approbation of his Lordship and yourself as it has already done that of His Royal Highness the Prince Regent in a manner so highly gratifying to me.

Be pleased to provide me with six official envelopes for the purpose of transmitting to R.N. PARKER Esq, Passage West, Ireland, 200 copies of the Articles of Agreement that they may be there executed without delay and correct lists returned to me of the individuals engaged to emigrate. I shall then furnish specific lists of the articled settlers and of those other individuals who may be disposed to proceed with me. [Transcriber's note: R.N.PARKER was his brother Richard Neville PARKER]

As the period prescribed for sailing is fast approaching, I take the liberty to submit that the shipping for 800 men, women and children be immediately engaged to take in stores in the River and proceed by the 15th or 20th of October to Cork.

There cannot be the smallest doubt of that number of unexceptionable characters being ready to embark in all November at Cork under my direction and conformably to the humane intentions of Government.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your most obedient and very humble st.

Wm PARKER

Individuals wishing to emigrate to the Cape of Good Hope from Cork Harbour under the direction of William PARKER Esq.

No.

Names

Residence

Trades

Age

Wives

Boys

Girls

Total No.

Family

1

John FOLEY

Passage West

House Carpenter

44

Barbara

1

2

5

2

John HERBERT

Macroom

Do.

29

Catherine

1

1

4

3

James SWEENEY

Passage West

Do.

32

Ann

2

2

6

4

Michael CORKERY

Do.

Do.

30

Batchelor

   

1

5

James O'CALLAHAN

House of Industry

Do.

44

Deborah

   

2

6

James FINN (1)

Passage West

Do.

39

Catharine

2

3

7

7

James FINN (2)

Do.

Do.

36

Marg't

3

1

6

8

Michael FITZPATRICK

Do.

Do.

21

Batchelor

 

 

1

9

Michael CONNOLLY

Cork

Do.

21

Do.

   

1

10

William PLUMLEY

Do.

Cabinet Maker

38

Julia

3

1

6

11

William COSTEN

Young Hall

Do.

43

Widower

   

1

12

John CALLUANE

Passage West

Sawyer

48

 

     

13

Edw'd CALLUANE

Do.

Do.

38

 

3

   

14

Nicholas DUGGAN

Douglas

Smith

23

Mary

   

2

15

Michael DONNEVAN

Do.

Do.

22

Batchelor

   

1

16

Michael SULLIVAN

Do.

Do.

22

Do.

   

1

17

Henry HUXLEY

Cork

Locksmith

28

Johanna

1

 

3

18

John DUGGAN

Cloyne

Labourer

21

Batchelor

   

1

19

Daniel DELANEY

Passage West

Do.

26

Mary

2

1

5

20

William TAYLOR

Do.

Do.

35

Eleanor

3

1

6

21

John COLLER

Do.

Do.

30

Batchelor

   

1

22

John KIRK

Do.

Do.

36

Johanna

3

 

5

23

Michael GEARY

Monkstown

Do.

22

Batchelor

   

1

24

William ADAMS

Cork

Tobacco Spinner

19

Do.

   

1

25

Robert QUINLAN

Do.

Do.

20

Do.

   

1

26

John RYAN

Do.

Labourer

21

Eleanor

   

2

27

William COGAN

HillsTown

Do.

21

Batchelor

   

1

28

Michael CURRY

Do.

Do.

24

Do.

   

1

29

Coleman HARRINGTON

Cloyne

Do.

17

Do.

   

1

30

James REARDON

Cork

Do.

56

 

1

   

31

Thos. MURPHY

Do.

Do.

28

Johanna

2

 

5

32

Richard COLTON

Passage West

Do.

33

Batchelor

   

1

33

William CONNELL

Do.

Do.

40

Mary

1

2

5

34

John TAYLOR

Little Island

Do.

18

Batchelor

     

35

John POOR

Do.

Do.

         

36

John YOUNG

Do.

Do.

         

37

Tim'y LEARY

Do.

Do.

         

38

William BUCKLEY

Do.

Do.

         

39

David HARVEY

Do.

Do.

         

40

Wm. F. MOORE

Passage West

Militia Man

21

   

1

2

41

John MOORE

Do.

Do.

19

     

1

42

Stephen McKENDRICK

Cork

Labourer

16

       

43

William CONN

Do.

Victualler

30

       

44

John MORIARTY

Do.

Do,

20

       

45

William GALWAY

House of Industry

Sail Maker

40

Batchelor

     

46

Henry MILLER

Do.

Taylor

25

Elizabeth

   

2

47

Jer'h REGAN

Passage West

Shoe Maker

36

Mary

1

1

4

48

John BULLEN

Do.

Do.

25

Mary

1

2

5

49

Richard EVANS

Cork

Do.

29

Batchelor

   

1

50

Patrick JURRENS?

Seamount

Seaman

35

Ellen

3

1

6

51

Dan'l

Passage West

Baker

32

Mary

   

2

52

Michael HINCH

Do.

Do.

41

Mary

2

2

6

53

Wm. SANDIFORD

Cork

House Carpenter

20

Batchelor

   

1

54

Thos. LAWRENCE

Do.

Cooper

20

Do.

   

1

55

Florence CARNE

Do.

Do.

20

Do.

   

1

56

John HAYES

Do.

Do.

20

Do.

   

1

57

Denis SHEEHAN

Do.

Do,

20

Do.

   

1

58

James HARRIGAN

Do.

Do.

17

Do.

   

1

59

Thos. HAYLE

Do.

Do

18

Do.

   

1

60

William DRISCOLL

Passage West

Weaver

20

Do.

   

1

61

William DRISCOLL

Cork

Mason

32

Do.

   

1

62

James SULLIVAN

Passage Wesr

Do.

24

Do.

   

1

63

Jer'h DRISCOLL

Do.

Do.

32

Do.

   

1

64

John DALY

Cork

Mason

36

Batchelor

   

1

65

Tim'y DALY

Do.

Do.

31

Do.

   

1

66

Silvester HOGAN

Do.

Do.

34

Mary

2

2

6

67

John CROSSLEY

Do.

Do.

27

Mary

1

1

4

68

William KEATING

Douglas

Sawyer

35

Bridget

 

2

4

69

John KEATING

Do.

Do.

40

Julia

   

2

70

John DUGGAN

Passage West

 

46

Widower

2

 

3

71

William SANDIFORD

Cork

House Carpenter

20

Batchelor

   

1

72

Michael REGAN

Passage West

Quarryman

45

Eliz.

 

4

6

73

Daniel SULLIVAN

Do.

Labourer

40

Mary

5

3

10

74

Patrick [illegible]

Do.

Do.

22

Batchelor

   

1

75

James BOWEN

Cork

Do.

20

Do.

   

1

76

Michael HALLIDAY

Passage West

Do.

37

 

2

2

6

77

John LEARY

Pensioner 44th Regt

Butcher

37

     

1

78

Tim'y LEARY

Passage West

Do.

28

     

1

79

Daniel MAHONY

Cork

Taylor

36

Ann

1

1

4

80

John HANLY

Passage West

Shoemaker

40

Julia

2

4

8

81

James PENNY

Do.

Labourer

44

Mary

5

2

9

82

Thos. PENNY

Passage West

Labourer

20

Batchelor

   

1

83

Michael CALLAGHAN

Cork

Do.

26

Johanna

1

1

4

84

Robert DUGGAN

Do.

Cabinet Maker

20

     

1

85

Owen HEALEY

Cork

Mason

47

Catherine

1

3

}

86

John HEALEY

Do.

Do.

23

     

} 9

87

Dennis HEALEY

Do.

Do.

21

     

}

88

Thos. HEALEY

Do.

Do.

18

     

}

89

Thos. HAWKINS

Passage West

Labourer

28

Mary

1

1

4

90

DARBY

Do.

Do.

35

Batchelor

   

1

91

Matthew FITZGERALD

Cork

Mason

25

Do.

   

1

92

Cornelius [illegible]

Do.

Labourer

22

Do.

   

1

93

James SULLIVAN

Evergreen

Do.

30

Johanna

1

2

5

94

John DONNAGHUE

Do.

Do.

19

Batchelor

   

1

95

Abraham PRESTON

Charleville

Lab.& Schoolmaster

30

       

96

William HEALEY

Cork

Gardener

34

       

97

James BARRY

Do.

Labourer

20

       

98

Owen McCARTHY

Do.

Do.

20

       

99

WOOL

St.Hadon?

Farmer

         

100

WOOL

Do.

Do.

         

101

WOOL

Do.

Do.

         

102

WOOL

Do.

Do.

         

103

WOOL

Do.

Do.

         

104

WOOL

Do.

Do.

         

105

Wm. BOYS

Kilsworth

Gentleman Farmer

         

106

James FERNLER?

Cork

Plumber

         

107

Denis DESMOND

Kinsale

Wheelwright

         

108

Solomon BROMPTON

Cork

Sadler

         

109

Eugene SULLIVAN

Do.

Cooper

         

110

Barry HAYES

Do.

Mason

         

111

Wm. WALSH

Do.

Do.

         

112

Thomas SHARPE

Do.

Clerk

         

113

John TAYLOR

Cove

Gentleman

         

114

Wm. PARKER

West Passage

Do.

         

115

H. PARKER

Do.

Do.

         

116

Daniel NORMAN

Cove

Labourer

36

Wife

2

   

117

John FITZGERALD

Blackrock

Do.

22

       

118

David FITZGERALD

Do.

Do.

19

       

119

John WALSH

Passage West

Boatman

33

Wife

1

1

 

120

Cornelius [illegible]

[illegible]

Do.

25

Do.

1

   

121

William SHEEHAN

Cove

Do.

23

Do.

 

2

 

122

Daniel KELLY

Kinsale

Labourer

24

Batchelor

     

123

Michael WHITE

Rosskillen

Do.

27

Do.

     

124

David [illegible]

Kinsale

Wheelwright

45

Wife

2

2

 

125

John HIGGINS

Fota

Labourer

23

       

126

Michael DONAHUE

 

Do.

24

       

127

Michael HALLIREY

 

Do

34

Wife

     

128

Tim'y CARTHY

 

Do.

33

       

129

F. CORENCE

Bredons?

           

130

Patrick COLLINS

Cross Haven

 

50

Wife

     

131

Florence COLLINS

Cross Haven

Labourer

20

       

132

Patrick SWINEY

Do.

Boatman

24

       

133

Frederick FITZGERALD

Do.

Labourer

26

       

134

James HOLLAND

Do.

Do.

26

       

135

Charles McCARTHY

Carrigaline

Do.

23

       

136

Daniel CONNELLY

Monkstown

Do.

23

       

137

Wellin BERRY

 

Boatman

21

       

138

John DUGGAN

Cloyne

Labourer

22

       

139

Charles [illegible]

Cloyne House

Carpenter

21

       

140

John CONNELL

Cove

Shoemaker

36

       

141

Wm. McCARTHY

Do.

Do.

25

       

142

William SULLIVAN

Coolemore

Labourer

19

       

143

Michael FLAHERTY

Do.

Do.

18

       

144

James NOWLAN

Cove

House Carpenter

21

       

145

John HAYES

Passage West

Labourer

40

Wife

3

3

 

146

Daniel NOONAN

Cove

Do.

36

       

147

John FITZGERALD

Do.

Do.

         

148

David FITZGERALD

Blackrock

 

19

       

149

John WALSH

Passage West

Boatman

33

       

150

William DONOUGHOE

 

Mason

36

       

151

John CATHINAN

 

Mason

32

       

152

John HAYES

 

Labourer

41

Wife

     

153

Richard PAYNE

Cloyne

Do.

37

Wife

5

1

 

154

John MOORE

Do.

Do.

33

Wife

 

3

 

155

Richard DUGGAN

Douglas

Smith

23

Batchelor

   

1

156

John KEEFFE

Shanbally

Labourer

30

Wife

1

1

 

157

Cornelius MURPHY

Kinsale

Shoemaker

24

Batchelor

   

1

158

James DRISCOLL

Do.

Taylor

21

Do.

   

1

159

James MAHONY

Cork

Baker

21

Wife

     

160

Michael MULCAHY

Do.

Do.

22

Wife

1

   

161

Patrick MAHONY

Do.

Do

24

Wife

     

162

Joseph REILY

Passage

Labourer

20

Batchelor

   

1

163

William DEVEEN

   

46

       

164

John DEVEEN

   

23

       

165

Denis BUCKLEY

Bandon

Labourer

32

Wife

     

166

Florence McCARTHY

Do.

Do.

31

       

167

William BUCKLEY

Little Island

Do.

24

       

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 240

Crown Hotel, Strand

29th September 1819

Sir,

The unlimited confidence placed by such a large body of settlers in my exertions and the weighty and important duties which consequently devolve on me, require my addressing you more at large respecting my proposed Establishment on the banks of the Knysna. Therefore I must earnestly request that you will submit this letter without any delay to the serious consideration of my Lord BATHURST. It is absolutely necessary that the most perfect understanding should take place with the Colonial Department and myself on this subject. I am perfectly aware that a difficulty does exist respecting the extent of the cultivated lands in the neighbourhood of the Knysna and that the farms on the banks of that river are in possession of other individuals.

Mr. BARROW in his letter from Ryde of the 19th inst distinctly states that he apprehends that the best speculation independent of the Government Grants would be the purchase of one of the farms at the Knysna, as the spot must, and speedily too, be the site of a flourishing town, as it possesses the only safe harbour in the whole extent of the Eastern Coast!! With the same impression I stated to you in my letter of the 3rd inst that I particularly requested Earl BATHURST would be pleased to facilitate my arrangements with Mr. George REX of Milkwood Kraal for the purchase of the farm of East Ford, which appears on the map and is represented to me as being the best situated for a town.

Having suffered most severely from shipwreck, both in the loss of the nearest & dearest friends and of a considerable property, experience so dearly purchased teaches me to pause before I commit any more lives or property to the dangerous coast of Southern Africa without the utmost deliberation. The land in the Zuur Veldt is indeed described by Mr. BARROW as the richest in the Colony, but as no market can be had for its produce without a safe navigation it would be unwise, as a commercial man experienced as I am, to seek the means of my perpetual ruin.

Mr. SHEARES who has made a complete survey of Algoa Bay has informed me that when the Batavia E.I. Ship lay there she was twice nearly being lost, the boats being swamped in the surf, he and the men with great difficulty saved their lives in getting to and from the shore. This gentleman has warmly associated himself with me, much as his knowledge as a scientific and enlightened seaman adds strength to my undertaking. I trust that the Earl BATHURST will, as far as his Lordship can, countenance our arduous exertions in establishing New Cork on the banks of the Knysna, which under the countenance of His Royal Highness the Prince Regent, his Lordships auspices and the powerful protection of Government will I hope become as Mr. BARROW states and speedily too “a flourishing town”.

I further beg leave to suggest that every requisite article of defence should be provided in London to give confidence and security to the settlers who embark with me. Difficulties may arise on their arrival at Cape Town as to their being supplied with arms and ammunition and as several Naval & Military Officers have volunteered to go out under my direction and as such high testimonials have reached Earl BATHURST of my unimpeachable loyalty, I shall on receipt of your answer take leave to submit to his Lordships consideration a requisition for Ordnance Stores to be shipped on board of one of the transports at the Tower for the use of the Settlement. These stores are to be considered bona fide as the property of the Crown and to be accounted for accordingly. An efficient Colonial Militia has frequently preserved our West India Islands and settlements in America from hostile attack. Such a kind of force is admirably adapted for the service of the new colony, particularly as I propose that one third of the corps I have offered to raise should be cavalry. An officer of the 10th Regt of great experience who has offered to go out, and who served at the Cape of Good Hope, has afforded me considerable information thereon.

I take leave to inclose a copy of a letter which I have received from the Rev'd C.J. LATROBE. It may afford you some information in the arrangements with the settlers. It adds weight to Mr. SHEARE's and my former determination of purchasing the lands on the banks of the Knysna; our settlers can I hope procure the lands that may be uncolocated [sic] adjacent to this harbour.

Since I had the honour of seeing you last Mr. WILBERFORCE, Mr. GRANT of Russell Square and Mr. BUTTERWORTH of Bedford Square have offered me their assistance and advice. Mr. WILBERFORCE's offer is the more gratifying to me as it was totally unsolicited, the spontaneous effusion of a noble and generous mind.

Several public societies, mercantile characters of weight in the city have also come forward on this occasion. Therefore I patiently, although anxiously, wait the result of my Lord BATHURST's final determination. I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servt.

Wm. PARKER

[enclosed with above letter]

Copy [in PARKER's handwriting]

To William PARKER Esq

Crown Hotel, Strand

Fulmer, near Leeds

Sept 25th 1819

Dear Sir

On my arrival here last night I found your obliging letter of the 18th instant and hasten by the first post to return an answer to it, tho' I fear not as satisfactory as I would wish, not having made such observations as might assist in your researches. All I know of the country about the Knysna is contained in the account I have given of that River in my journal, and I hardly know anything to add that would be interesting to you (see p.156 158) Had not a thick fog prevented it I should have has a better report to make, especially of the Estuary of that River, of which as I afterwards heard it was intended to make some use as a harbour or place of refuge for ships. It was said that certain rocks formed a kind of mole, or defined towards the sea. For want of some island or rocks, breaking the force of the sea, lying before the entrances of Plattenburg, Algoa and other Bays they are very unsafe in south east gales, which are not infrequent in those seas. The Knysna appeared to me to flow thro' a fine country and where there is any supply of water in S. Africa there is little doubt but cultivation would be easy. Mr. REX has a garden in the Valley but I don't remember having seen any plantations or cultivated grounds higher up the river where the ford is situated. As I had heard from W. VANKERVAL the Landrost of George that all the country was occupied except Jackall's Kraal, near Plattenburg Bay, I did not take such notice of the places I passed as I otherwise should have done. I remember our being much pleased with the banks of the Knysna when we spent the night. W. VANKERVAL informed me that there was no unoccupied land in his district except Jackall's Kraal and prevailed upon me to go and see it. It appeared to me and the Missionary who accompanied me a very eligible spot for a settlement, but the Hottentots I had taken with me from Gnadenthal, who were very intelligent men, objected to it on account of their want of sweet grass, which with them is a main consideration. W. VANKERVAL is deservedly considered as a character of superior excellence and I hope is still the Landrost of George. A report reached me some time ago that he had another appointment at Cape Town. I was very sorry not to see him on my return from the interior.

I wish you much success & that the favour & blessing of God may attend you in the execution of your benevolent plan, which as you foresee will be attended by no small difficulties.

Our new settlement on the Witte River beyond the Sundays River has been burnt by the Caffres after all the cattle had been taken. Nine Hottentots were killed on that occasion; but I have as yet received no particulars relating to the melancholy event. I trust the war will soon end by the expulsion of those ferocious invaders. In the former war they penetrated far into the colony.

I am truly concerned not to be able to answer your kind enquiries as you wish and as your kindness deserves, but with sincere esteem remain ever, dear Sir

Your most faithful and hble sevt.

C.J. LATROBE

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 256

No.10 Adam Street

Adelphi

4 Oct 1819

Sir,

I most earnestly entreat your reference to my unanswered letters of the 22nd and 28th ult and I now take leave to inform you for the information of the Earl BATHURST that I have received from the Reverend Francis McCLELAND of Longford a very favourable testimonial with the signatures of the present Lord Bishop of Raphoe and two Fellows of the College of Dublin of his competency for the clerical duties.

Mr. HART, another of the Fellows, is now with me and as he has assured me of Mr. McCLELAND's excellent character as a Clergyman, a Scholar and a Gentleman the settlers who go out with me can have no objection to his being nominated by the Earl BATHURST as the Chaplain to the colonists.

But Mr. McCLELAND, as the time is so limited for preparing for such an arduous enterprize, is anxious along with the other settlers to be favoured with an early answer, and he wishes to submit to Earl BATHURST the names of the individuals willing to accompany him under my direction. To this I can have no objection.

As the religious, social and moral happiness of the settlers will depend on the zeal, ardour and abilities of my Reverend associate I should much wish that he should immediately join me in London, that I may have an opportunity of introducing him to the Committees of the Societies for promoting the great cause of Religion and Morality and to many persons eminent for their virtues such as the Bishop of Gloucester, Mr. WILBERFORCE, Mr. GRANT, Mr. COLQUHOUN and Mr. BUTTERWORTH.

I request that you will be pleased to assure my Lord BATHURST that it is my fixed resolution to adopt every means within my reach to make New Cork a happy and thriving place. For proofs of my using these means I can refer his Lordship to the Personages to whom I have above alluded and to Sir Benjamin BLOOMFIELD.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient and very humble servant

Wm. PARKER

Just as I was finishing the above I received the three accompanying letters respecting Mr. McCLELAND which I take leave to submit to your and my Lord BATHURSTs notice and request that you will be so good as to return them with an early answer.

[Transcriber's Note: GOULBURN wrote across the corner of the above letter ‘Let the Clergyman be accepted & assured that he need not marry', the latter point being a reference to a point made in Francis McCLELAND's letters below. After William PARKER's postscript on the back of the letter GOULBURN wrote:

Do you consider this person as a proper clergyman for Mr. PARKER's Party or would you enquire what is the religious faith of his settlers before you send a Church of England clergyman?

In a different hand is written:

If W. PARKER goes out as principal it must be taken for granted he has applied for a clergyman agreeable to the faith of those he takes out. May we not assure the poor man that he need not marry, of which he seems so afraid by his note]

[enclosed with the above letter]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 258

Longford

September 29th 1819

Sir,

I did myself the honour of forwarding to you yesterday a character of morality which had been signed for me on my leaving College by the present Bishop of Raphoe. I waited on Lord FORBES this day who instantly signed the character I now enclose. It is also signed by two clergymen and the seneschal in this town. The rector of the Parish resides at present in France otherwise I should have his signature also. As there is at present no Bishop of Ardagh that will I trust account for my having no signature from the Bishop in whose diocese I reside.

I have another character of morality, signed by Mr. COBBE, nephew of the late Archbishop of Tuam, by the Vicar General of this diocese Revd. Archdeacon BEATTY, Dr. WRAY FTCD and a Mr. RADCLIFF, vicar of a Parish in the County Armagh. There is no second Member of Parliament for this county but I have no doubt I shall be able to obtain G. FETHERSTONE's signature [on] any character I like and he is supposed to be the successful candidate for the representation.

My brother mentions that it would be an additional recommendation to me to be married, however if it could be dispensed with I should prefer waiting till I should be settled in the new colony. In conclusion my Lord FORBES directs me to [advise?] Mr. GOULBURN to refer to him if he should wish to make any further enquiries relative to me.

Yr. obed't servant

Francis McCLELAND

[attached to above letter]

Copies – originals sent to Mr. McCLELAND

The Revd. Francis McCLELAND has been personally known to me for some time and I believe him to be in every respect qualified to be sent out by Government as a clergyman to the Cape of Good Hope.

Longford, September 28th 1819

FORBES MP

Thomas WAKEBY seneschal

Geo. CRAWFORD of Raphoe

[illegible signatures]

I certify that I have known the Revd. Francis McCLELAND these 15 years and can safely declare that I consider him a most correct, proper, well conducted young man. He is an excellent scholar and in every respect qualified for any situation he may think proper to undertake.

R. WAKEFORD

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 262

10 Adam Street

Adelphi

Oct 5th 1819

My Lord,

As a general interest has been incited throughout a great part of Ireland with respect to my offer of conducting a New Establishment of the Eastern Coast of Africa my numerous friends in that and in this country have kindly afforded me their most cheerful assistance.

The inclosed letter from my Lord ROSSE to your Lordship with that to my near relative Mr. WRIGHT, one of Lord ROSSEs oldest friends, were received on Saturday by me and I beg leave to submit them to your Lordship's consideration.

It has so happened that few of my friends are honoured by a personal acquaintance with your Lordship, or I should not have been five weeks in the metropolis without having availed myself of an appropriate introduction.

Honoured as my labours are by the countenance and approbation of the Bishop of Gloucester, Lord ENNISMORE, Mr. WILBERFORCE, Mr. GRANT Senior, Mr. BUTTERWORTH and Mr. MACAULEY, all of whom feel the great difficulties with which I have to combat and flatter me that my exertions will be found competent to the arduous task in which I am engaged. I am encouraged to hope that whenever you may please to honour me with a conference I shall be received by your Lordship with some favourable circumstances.

I beg leave to assure your Lordship that I am greatly ambitious to introduce into the New Establishment a system that hereafter should be permanent by [image blurred] and to secure the happiness and welfare of the new settlers. On this subject I have corresponded with Mr. GOULBURN and have in reply been [deigned?] by some communications of a pleasing nature.

Pleased as I am as the Director of a large party of emigrants, some of whom are very respectable and recommended as I have been in the handsomest manner to the Colonial Department by Mr. GRANT as the Organ of the Irish Government, I presume on public grounds to take the liberty of soliciting the favour of an interview whenever it may most accord with your Lordship's commitments.

I have the honour to be my Lord

Your Lordship's most obedient and very humble servant

Wm. PARKER

Note from GOULBURN in margin: Lord B being detained in the country on urgent business of a personal nature is unable to fix a day for receiving Mr. PARKER]

 

[enclosed with above letter]

Parsonstown

September 24th 1819

My dear Lord,

I have been requested by some friends here to recommend Mr. PARKER to you, who is going to form a settlement near the Cape of Good Hope. I do not know the gentleman but I do his family, which is respectable, and I hear he is a man of very good character, active brave and enterprising, & particularly well qualified for such an undertaking.

My dear Lord

Your faithful humble servant

ROSSE

[presumably to PARKER's relative Mr. WRIGHT]

My Dear Sir,

I enclose the letter though I cannot think that it will be of any use, Mr. PARKER having long since got letters of introduction to so many of the Cabinet Ministers. However Lord BATHURST is the only one of them, I believe, who has any connection with the affairs of the settlement at the Cape.

I am yours truly

ROSSE

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 267-273

Knightsbridge

13th September 1819

Dear Sir,

I have the honour of enclosing you a letter which I have received from Mr. PARKER of the County of Cork. He shortly goes to the Coast of Africa as a settler, under the sanction of Government, and as he means to build a town on the River Knysna, which in many respects resembles that of Cork, he wishes to commemorate his native county by naming the town New Cork, and as you will see by his letter has hopes that His Royal Highness the Prince Regent will be graciously pleased to sanction his giving it that name, which will confer an additional honor on the City of Cork to which His Royal Highness has already been so munificent.

Mr. PARKER is eminently qualified for the station which he hopes to fill and I have no doubt he will be of the greatest service both to the colony and to this country. Sir Jonas ROWLEY, Admiral at Cork, has entrusted Mr. PARKER with a manuscript map of that part of Africa where he means to settle which I have the honor of sending you with his letter and which it will be necessary for him to return to Sir J. ROWLEY.

As Mr. PARKER is obliged to leave town for Ireland in a few days perhaps my dear Sir you will have the goodness to take as early an opportunity as circumstances may admit of to intimate his request to His Royal Highness.

I have the honor to be my dear Sir

Your very obliged and humble servant

ENNISMORE

[letter from William PARKER to Viscount ENNISMORE, Kingston House, referred to above]

Crown Hotel, Strand

11 September 1819

My dear Lord,

As a benevolent and patriotic Irish Nobleman, and especially as a native of the City of Cork, your Lordship must be particularly interested in the success of the enterprize which so deeply engages my attention and which has brought me to this metropolis.

The great distress of a large part of the population in Ireland, whose sufferings have been so patiently and loyally endured, has for many years elicited my commiseration and induced me to use my personal exertions on their behalf. These exertions led me to a constant correspondence with some of the most distinguished characters of the age, and among others with Mr. VANSITTERT the Chancellor of the Exchequer and Mr GRANT the Chief Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. After reading Mr. VANSITTERT's benevolent and humane speech on the 13th July in the House of Commons on the subject of the Emigration to the Cape of Good Hope, I tendered him my services to conduct one of the colonies in these fertile and salubrious regions.

My friend Admiral Sir Jonas ROWLEY, who formerly commanded at the Cape, fixed my attention on the harbour at the Knysna, in the District of George Town, and through his kindness I procured a manuscript map of it and the adjacent lands. This map I beg leave to send your Lordship. It will remind you of our noble harbour of Cork, the “statio bene fida carinis” of which it is a complete epitome. [Transcriber's Note: This means ‘Safe Harbour for Ships' and is the motto of the City of Cork] The safety of the Knysna induces me to select it for the establishment of a commercial Port, so highly necessary and desirable to ensure a depot and market for the produce of the extensive country in its neighbourhood, and to offer an asylum to the shipping that may resort to this tempestuous and consequently dangerous coast.

Viewing, as I do, the vast importance of my enterprize as one pregnant with the incalculable benefits to the British Empire and eminently calculated to provide for thousands of our redundant population, many of whom lead a life of helpless misery in Ireland, degrading to human nature, and fraught with alarm to national prosperity, I am desirous through your Lordship to elicit the countenance of His Royal Highness the Prince Regent to my arduous undertaking.

Therefore, my dear Lord, I have the request on the part of myself and those respectable individuals associated with me in this philanthropic object, that you will be so good as to entreat His Royal Highness to be graciously pleased to direct that the Town which we propose erecting on the Knysna be called New Cork and that the Regiment of Colonial Militia which we propose organizing in the district be called the Royal Knysna Militia.

I have submitted to Earl BATHURST detailed proposals respecting our enterprize and Mr. GOULBURN has been pleased to state that my soliciting through your Lordship the Royal countenance would be highly pleasing to Lord BATHURST.

I am confident that as you have already elicited the Royal Patronage in promoting the fine arts in Cork that His Royal Highness will with equal zeal and an anxious desire to promote the interests of His Majesty's subjects, afford me through your Lordship's interposition these marks of the Royal favor.

I have the honor to be, my dear Lord, with great regard and respect

Your Lordship's most obedient and very faithful friend and servant

Wm. PARKER

Carlton House

September 16th 1819

My Dear Sir,

The Prince Regent is favorably disposed to the Prayer of Mr. PARKER's letter, if provided Lord BATHURST sees no official inconvenience in granting it.

Yours faithfully

B. BLOOMFIELD

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 279

10 Adam Street, Adelphi

6th October 1819

Sir,

I have had the honour to receive your letter of this date and take leave to state that in my letter of the 22nd ult I full consented “as a settler accompanied by 100 artificers, mechanics and labourers to conform to the conditions of the printed circulars” at the same time I transmitted to you a list of 124 individuals willing to accompany me.

I considered that letter as a full assent to the provisions prescribed by the Colonial Department and, as I have not been honoured with an answer, apprehend that it may not have reached your hands, which accounts for the circumstance of my not having been favoured with your reply.

I deem it fortunate my having remained in London, that I may explain in person to yourself and Lord BATHURST any point you may please to require.

My associate Mr. SHEARES will shortly transmit to me from Cork fair lists of the said individuals willing to join our party under my direction and of the labouring classes who will be articled to them and us. I therefore hope that the shipping for 800 men, women and children for our party will be immediately provided.

I have not as yet made any arrangement with a Medical Practitioner, an individual so necessary to insure success to the colony.

Be pleased to inform me if the testimonials for the Rev'd Francis McCLELAND be such as to entitle him to the approbation of my Lord BATHURST.

This gentleman from the important duties he will have to perform as a clergyman will have several arrangements to make in London prior to our sailing.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your most obedient and very humble servant

Wm. PARKER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 185

October 6th 1819

My Dear Sir,

On leaving you today I communicated to Mr. William PARKER what you stated to me relative to his intended emigration to the Cape. He desires me to say that he is ready to go out on the usual conditions and is extremely anxious that the ships should be sent to Cork for that purpose as soon as possible & beg therefore to recommend him to your favourable attention & am Sir

[by hand?]

W. COLQUHOUN

[GOULBURN's note at foot: Accept Mr. PARKER's proposal]

281

No.10 Adam Street

Adelphi

8 October 1819

Sir,

The suffering to which many individuals have been exposed who have emigrated to His Majesty's foreign possessions having not the humane and considerate attention of My Lord BATHURST, and having in my own person been an eye witness abroad to the miserable fate of numerous similar adventurers, I am induced to hope, under his Lordship's acceptance of my proposal to conduct a body of settlers to the Cape of Good Hope, that he will be pleased to sanction a supply of old and worn out naval stores being shipped on board the vessels for the use of the Irish settlers proceeding under my direction.

When the trifling value of these stores to Government is placed in competition to the comfort and utility they would afford to so large a body of our almost naked and suffering fellow creatures, I trust I need not entertain a doubt that his Lordship will favourably attend to the accompanying requisition.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your very obedient humble servant

Wm. PARKER

[note from GOULBURN on reverse: Lord B has only to repeat that he cannot afford to Mr. PARKER any indulgences not given to the other persons who proceed to the Cape with similar objects.

Naval Stores required for the use of Settlers proceeding from Ireland under the direction of Wm. PARKER Esq of Cork for the Cape of Good Hope.

Hammocks old 500

Junk 10 tons

Fearnoughts 5 tons

Gum Baise 2½ tons

Old Sails 7½ tons

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 284

No.10 Adam Street

Adelphi

8 October 1819

Sir,

My Lord BATHURST having been pleased by your letter of the 6th instant to accept my proposal for taking out a party of colonists for the Cape of Good Hope, it becomes my important duty to provide as far as in my power lies, as well for their protection as their multifarious wants.

The disturbed state of the Eastern Settlement at the Cape of Good Hope and the necessity of the settlers possessing within themselves the means of defence, induce me to submit to Earl BATHURST's consideration a requisition for Ordnance Stores for their protection. Altho' the appointment of Military or Militia Officers in a Foreign Settlement may lie with the Governor, yet while the settlers may be exposed to incursions during a ferocious Caffre war I most respectfully submit that arrangements for their protection should be duly considered before they sail, and that they should be provided with all the requisites for defence for their personal safety.

I have already had the honour of a personal communication with W. HARRISSON of the Treasury and W. CREW of the Board of the Ordnance on this very important subject, and these gentlemen agree with me that it is an object which must press heavily on those who may have to conduct a party of colonists and that on a proper application being made to Earl BATHURST his Lordship would be pleased to give the necessary directions accordingly.

As a provision for a poor & a redundant population is the principal feature of the late Parliamentary grant I beg leave to state that the large body of settlers I have proposed to conduct from Ireland is so extremely poor that providing arms and ammunition for their defence is beyond the means of the respectable individuals who accompany them. I must therefore respectfully yet most earnestly beseech my Lord BATHURST to take this application into his Lordship's most gracious, humane and prompt consideration. I have the honour to be Sir

Your very obedient humble servant

Wm. PARKER

[Note from GOULBURN at foot}

Acknowledge receipt and acquaint him in reply that as the Colonial Government will extend to the settlers under Mr. PARKER's direction, in common with the other inhabitants of the Colony, every adequate protection against hostile incursion, Lord B does not think it advisable to place at the disposal of any individual settler the military stores specified in his list.

Requisition for the undermentioned articles of Camp Equipage, Arms, Accoutrements, Ammunition, Entrenching Tools &c &c for the use and defence of Settlers proceeding to the Cape of Good Hope under the direction of Wm. PARKER Esq.

?

[obscured] Bayonets

200

Horse Pistols

100

Carbines

100

Rifles

100

Cavalry Swords

16

Halberts

100,000

Musket Ball Cartridges

10,000

Pistol Cartridges

50

Barrels of Gunpowder

10

Barrels of Priming Do.

8

Six Pounder Field Pieces

1,000

Round Shot

1,000

Grape Shot

5,000

Musquit Flints

3,000

Pistol Flints

10

Blunderbusses

20

Gallons Oil 28th Emery

200

Sky Rockets

6

Drums

6

Fifes

1

Kettle Drum

3

Trumpets

4

Bugles

100

Saddles with 3 Girths Each

100

Pads of Pistol Holsters

300

Pouches & Belts

100

Valices

100

Bridles & 100 Collars & Chains

100

Cavalry Belts & Pouches

20

Pieces of Girth Webb

200

Spare Buckles

10

Hides

150

Tents

20

Marquees

2

Armourers Forges

10

Wallpieces

20

Sets of Harness

200

Pick Axes & Spades

10

Tons of Tarpauling

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 315

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

15 October 1819

Sir,

I have had the honour to receive your letter of the 13th inst and I am much pleased to find “that my Lord BATHURST is of opinion that in consideration of the large proportion of individuals comprising my party that I should provide adequate medical attendance to guard against accidents and disease during the voyage.” You may recollect that this was a subject which pressed heavily on me and which in conversation I urged seriously on your attention.

Indeed I rejoice that his Lordship has so humanely turned his attention to it, and I earnestly hope that he will not confine medical aid to the settlers during the voyage but that arrangements may be made for the Medical Attendant remaining among the settlers.

It was my intention to advertise for a Medical Gentleman on the Half Pay of the Army or Navy, acquainted with Midwifery, but I thought it premature doing so until Lord BATHURST was pleased to hold out some public encouragement to such an indispensable individual. When you are pleased to communicate what the encouragement may be there can be no difficulty in my submitting the name of a competent individual to Lord BATHURST's consideration.

I am preparing with every dispatch the returns of the persons proceeding under my direction, but as your letter of the 6th inst was not received until the 7th I could not possibly have any accounts from Ireland for some days to come.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your very obedient humble servant

Wm. PARKER

[Draft of GOULBURN's rely to above]

Acknowledge receipt and acquaint him that he appears to have much misunderstood the object of my communication, which was simply that as you had in your letter of the 6th inst given me to understand that it was your intention to procure a surgeon to accompany the settlers I should be informed whether you had, as other considerable settlers have done, engaged the services of a competent person. That nothing was further from Lord B's intention in recommending to him a measure not less necessary to his own interests than to the welfare of the settlers to suggest any expectation that the Gov't would undertake in Mr. PARKER's case what has not been applied for in others to give regular pay or other special encouragement to a surgeon of his selection. A letter enclosed by mistake herewith returned.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 318

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

16 Octr 1819

Sir,

With reference to your letter of the 17th ult it is with considerable regret I learn “that the anti colonial system of the Dutch still exists in full force at the Cape of Good Hope and that from this circumstance it will not be possible to abandon in my favour the right of cutting timber which has heretofore always been reserved to the Crown”.

On a reference to the printed circular which you did me the honour to transmit to me there is no reservation of the timber in question and as the conditions therein stated are the only terms on which the offers of settlers could be accepted “the usual and it appears the only reservations are the right of the Crown to mines of precious stones, of gold and silver and to make such roads as may be necessary for the convenience of the Colony”.

As several Naval Artisans intended to accompany me they have got seriously alarmed at the dangers to be apprehended from the unwise system of Dutch colonization and they have earnestly requested my soliciting an explanation on the subject of the timber on the lands which they are to possess, which I now most respectfully do.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

Wm. PARKER

[draft of GOULBURN's reply]

In reply to your letter of the...which I have duly laid before Lord B I have received his Lordship's direction to refer you to my letter of the.....in which Lord B distinctly communicated that it is not in his power ,,,,&c &c &c

If the reservation of timber is not specially mentioned in the printed letter especially transmitted to you it is only because the district in which it is proposed to establish the settlement is not abundant in timber of a description of that [obscured]

 

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 345

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

28 October 1819

Sir,

I have had the honour to receive your letter of yesterday and request that you will be pleased to assure Earl BATHURST that I have every intention to proceed to the Cape of Good Hope this year, but as the individuals in Ireland, who are engaged in nautical pursuits, could receive no positive assurance from me of being located on the Sea Coast they have declined accompanying me for the present. However, I am supplying their places with agriculturalists as persons more suited to the proposed plan of Colonization. I therefore hope to experience from my Lord a few more days indulgence to enable me to complete my list; and if his Lordship pleases I shall make a Deposit on account of the settlers (early next week) proceeding with me.

I have engaged two Medical Gentlemen to accompany me and I wish to know if I am to transmit their testimonials to you to be submitted to my Lord BATHURST' approbation.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your obedient and very humble servant

Wm. PARKER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 354

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

October 30th 1819

Sir,

With reference to my letter of the 28th ult I take leave to state that Doctor John ROCHE, an eminent Physician, and Mr. John ADDEY, a Surgeon and Apothecary, have acceded to the terms I proposed for their accompanying my party of settlers to the Cape of Good Hope.

I therefore am desirous to know if My Lord BATHURST wishes to have their testimonials as to qualifications submitted to his Lordship's approbation.

I am much concerned in being obliged to inform you that Mr. SHEARES, from whom I expected the most zealous and valuable co-operation, has declined accompanying me, as being brought up to nautical pursuits and possessed of every requisite to render his services valuable he would not embark on any uncertainty as to his place of location.

However I am fully determined to proceed even under this disadvantage. I have the honour to be Sir

Your very obedient servant

Wm PARKER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 347

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

Saturday 30 October 1819

1 o'clock

Mr. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. GOULBURN, takes leave to inform him that just as he had finished his official letter he received by the Two Penny Post his letter of the 20th inst which he ought to have received two days since.

Mr. PARKER is extremely concerned to inform Mr. GOULBURN that a very serious domestic misfortune has for this last month so occupied Mr. PARKER's attention that it has prevented his being as forward in his arrangements as he otherwise should, and he is perfectly satisfied that if either Earl BATHURST or Mr. GOULBURN knew of the circumstances that every indulgent consideration would be made for Mr. PARKER. It is one which has involved the lives of two most respectable Females, one of whom is a friend to Mr. PARKER, and her two infant children.

Mr. PARKER is preparing his list with all dispatch and only waits for the fair returns from Ireland which he expects early next week. In the mean time he takes the liberty to suggest that there is not the smallest occasion to delay the departure of the settlers as Mr. PARKER will be all prepared to embark in the course of next month.

Mr.PARKER takes the liberty to inclose two letters from the Medical Gentlemen desirous to proceed. Their testimonials he shall forthwith procure and transmit to Mr. GOULBURN to be submitted to Earl BATHURST.

[Draft of GOULBURN's reply]

Mr. GOULBURN's compliments to Mr. PARKER and in reply to his note has only to observe that until a nominal list of the persons to be embarked under his direction is received it is certainly impossible to take any measures for providing a conveyance for them & as there are many other persons perfectly prepared & equally anxious to proceed as settlers to the Cape Lord B cannot delay in accepting their offers in preference to Mr. PARKER unless Mr. PARKER's list be forthwith delivered.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 352

[enclosed with above letter, from John ADDEY to William PARKER]

Saturday morning

Oct 30th 1819

Sir,

I intended calling on you in the course of today. I certainly intend accompanying you to the Cape as before agreed between us and enclose the corrected copy of the articles between us which if you approve we can ratify on Monday evening in the presence of any party who are accompanying us. I shall wish to take my sister with me and my servants names are subjoined – but cannot make the deposits untill Monday evg or I would do so today. I remain Sir

Your obed't serv't

John ADDEY

Names &c for your list

John ADDEY 28 Apothecary & Accoucheur

Elizabeth ADDEY 21 Sister of the above

John WORLGROVE 35 Servant to the above

The above has resided at the Cape 3 years

[Transcriber's note: Elizabeth ADDEY does not appear in Nash but is listed as John ADDEY's wife in HOCKLY's ‘Story of the British Settlers of 1820']

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 349/351

[second enclosed letter, from John ROCHE to William PARKER]

Dear Sir

In acceding to your terms and agreeing to go out the Cape of Good Hope with your Party I have thought it necessary to send you the enclosed statement which I trust will be found satisfactory.

Your terms, if I remember right, are as follows: first each free settler to pay annually to the Physician and Surgeon one pound sterling for each of his articled servants. 2ndly the respectable families to pay as they do on the British Islands. 3rdly the Physician to have a grant of 100 acres of land for himself, and 50 acres for each of five articled servants, subject to the regulations prescribed by Government. 4thly the Physician to pay the Deposit required by Government.

I shall wait on you tomorrow about 9 in the evening, previously to my going out of town for a few days to make some necessary arrangements. In the mean time I have the honour to be Sir

Your obedient servant

John ROCHE

London

October 29 1819

Dear Sir,

The following statement will, I trust, supply you with such particulars respecting my character and qualifications as it may be necessary for you to make known at the office for the Colonial Department.

I am in my 36th year, was married in 1807 and have, at present, three children. I am a regularly bred Doctor of Medicine having attended lectures in every branch of medical & chirurgical science in Edinburgh for five whole years; that is from 1805 inclusive till 1810. Family affairs having again rendered it necessary for me to visit Edinburgh in 1816 I attended the lectures over again for six months: having thus in fact studied six entire sessions at that university which falls to the lot of but few, either surgeons or physicians.

In the courses of lectures, so far as I can call them to mind, were two courses on Anatomy & Surgery under Doctor MUNRO; one on Comparative Anatomy under Doctor BARCLAY; three courses of the Practice of Physics under Doctor GREGORY; three of Chemistry under Doctor HOPE; three of Materia Medica & Pharmacy under Doctors HOME & MURRAY; one of Physiology under Doctor DUNCAN; one of Botany under Doctor RUTHERFORD; three on Surgery & on Military Surgery under Doctor THOMSON & three on the Theory & Practice of Midwifery under Doctor HAMILTON. Besides these I attended lectures on Rhetoric, Logic & Natural Philosophy and two courses on Moral Philosophy, and two on Political Economy under that eminent philosopher, my master & friend, Professor Dugald STEWART.

The certificates of all these teachers (or Professor's Tickets as they are called in Scotland) together with my Doctor's Degree, Midwifery Diploma &c &c are all at present among my papers in Dublin and shall be submitted if necessary to the Chief Secretary in Ireland, Mr. GRANT.

From 1810 to 1814 I practised in London: but being appointed Lecturer on Moral Philosophy to the Dublin Institution I went over to Dublin in the winter of the latter year and delivered public lectures there, & subsequently at the Institutions of Cork & Belfast on Moral Philosophy & Political Economy. These lectures it is my intention to publish at some future period. During my residence in Ireland I was always in the habit of practising my Profession as a Physician. During the winter of 1815 & the spring of 1816 I practised a little in Bath having gone there for the benefit of the waters. During that period I published a weekly Moral & Literary Paper on the Plan of the British Essayists, which was much esteemed in Bath. It was called The Sceptic and is to be republished.

While in Edinburgh I had the honour of being unanimously chosen President of the Royal Physical Society of that city owing to my reputation as a public speaker & scholar at the time. This can be seen by my Diploma as President and Honorary Member of the Society.

I am one of the authors of Dr. REES' Cyclopaedia and the Encyclopaedia Britannica. You may see a contribution of mine in the former under the word “Instruct” and in the latter under the words “Semiplagians”, “Sense, pains & pleasures of” and “Smelling”.

In 1808 in Edinburgh I published a new edition of the Latin Medical Works of Celsus, an ancient Roman author. From this fact you form some idea of my classical acquirements.

I published in London, in 1813, a work (which I dedicated to my friend the Duke of Devonshire) on the Junius Controversy. You may see a long & elaborate account of it in The Antijacobin Review for September 1813 written by the late John GIFFORD Esq, the magistrate of Worship Street office. In the New Quarterly Review, of which Mr. GIFFORD was also editor, you may see a long essay of mine on The History of Political Philosophy and Jurisprudence in Europe. It is in the 2nd No. and was a Review of a work on Political Economy by a Mr. BOILEAU.

In the Reflector, a London quarterly magazine, you will find three long essays of mine (in Nos. 2, 3 & 4) on “The Instincts & mental Faculties of the Lower Animals as Compared with those of Man”, on “The Philosophy of Sensation & Perception” and on “The Origin, Progress, Corruption and Gradual Improvement of Medical Science” It is my intention, at some future time, to publish a history of medical science, for which I have been preparing materials for several years. I have been also, for some time, with the approbation of my friend Professor STEWART of Edinburgh, been preparing materials for a work on the Inductive Logic of Lord BACON.

The most recent of my literary labours, and on which I am at present engaged, is A Defence of the Protestant Religion in answer to a work recently published by the Roman Catholic Bishop Doctor MILNE, which he has called “The End of Religious Controversy” &c. A part of my MS has been submitted to the Rt.Hon. Robert PEEL, to whom my first letter is addressed.

In concluding this long statement permit me to add that it will afford me great pleasure to give you any further information that may be necessary for you at the office of the Colonial Department. Allow me to suggest that you ought still to exert your influence to obtain from His Majesty's Government some annual salary for the Physician who is to accompany you. With every possible respect for the clergy & for Religion, which no one values more highly than I do, I must affirm that the Physician is a more necessary member of the new colony than any clergyman. In a climate so different from ours health can be injured without the constant attendance of a scientific Physician.

I have the honour to be Sir &c &c

John ROCHE MD

 

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 364

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

1 November 1819

Sir,

I take leave to enclose the memorials of Mr. John ADDEY, a Medical gentleman, who is desirous to accompany my party of settlers to the Cape of Good Hope in the capacity of apothecary. Doctor ROCHE has proceeded to the country to make arrangements for his embarkation.

I shall be able to return you in a few days complete lists of the settlers. As I intend to give my encouragement to the clergyman I wait his returns from Longford, Mr. McCLELAND being particularly anxious to take a few families [therefrom?] that he was acquainted with.

At your leisure I will be much obliged by your having the goodness to return to me Doctor PERCEVAL's letter on the state of the Poor in Ireland and Mr. McCLELAND's testimonials, along with Mr. ADDEY's, should not Earl BATHURST deem it necessary to retain the letter.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your humble servant

Wm. PARKER

[note from GOULBURN: return him his papers]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 366

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

3 Nov 1819

Mr. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. GOULBURN, takes leave to inform him that in last night's he had the honour to receive his note of the 1st November and that he will send early tomorrow a nominal list of the 124 able bodied men who are willing to proceed as settlers under his direction to the Cape of Good Hope.

Mr. PARKER has not as yet rec'd the Rev'd McCLELAND's returns which he hopes to do tomorrow. Mr. GOULBURN will please to receive two additional testimonials of Mr. ADDEY's qualifications as a Medical Practitioner.

Mr. PARKER has received a communication from the Governor of the Foundling Hospital in Cork wherein they propose his taking out with him some grown up young men and women. This Institution is supported by a Local Tax on Coals imported into Cork Harbour. Its revenues are considerable but the number of young persons approaching to an adult age whom the Governors cannot procure situations for is so great that it has caused to them much anxiety. Mr. PARKER, if it met Lord BATHURST's approbation, would enter into an arrangement with the Governors, of whom the Lord Bishop of Cork is President, to take out 20 lads and 20 girls above the age of 15 years as agricultural apprentices, provided a grant of land was made to Mr. PARKER for his care and superintendence of these individuals. Mr. PARKER with the assistance of the Governors will provide in Ireland such Deposits as Earl BATHURST may judge expedient for the persons proposed to be taken from the Foundling Hospital.

368/370

I hereby certify that when I was House Surgeon of the Middlesex Hospital in the year 1808 I knew Mr. John ADDEY as articled apprentice to Mr. Charles DAWES, Apothecary, then of Charlotte Street, Rathbone Place, London. That he frequently visited me at the Hospital, witnessed the practice there and assisted at the inspection of bodies. That having completed his engagement with Mr. DAWES he resided with me six months at Twickenham, when I had every reason to be satisfied with his medical abilities, which are doubtless greatly improved by the nine years experience of London practice he has since obtained in the capacity of assistant apothecary.

Witness my hand this first day of November 1819

Charles Henry PODMORE

Twickenham, Midx.

65 Upper Berkeley Street

Portman Square

November 2nd 1819

Having resided with Mr. John ADDEY for these eight years past and thereby obtained an intimate knowledge of his medical abilities I have no hesitation in affirming that I believe him fully competent to all the practices of an apothecary.

Christopher HARRIS

Assistant Surgeon to Mr. SMITH

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 372

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

4 November 1819

Sir,

Herewith be pleased to receive a nominal list of the individuals who have proposed emigrating with me to the Cape of Good Hope. As I could give no assurance as to may place of location all the officers of the Navy and several shipwrights have declined accompanying me. This, with Mr. SHEARES withdrawing his co-operation attended with a severe domestic affliction has unavoidably caused some difficulties. I am also without any return from the Rev'd Francis McCLELAND of the names and ages of the persons who are desirous to accompany him. I however hope that by Saturday I shall be able to transmit to you correct lists.

About sixty of the families go out as articled servants to myself. You will be pleased to observe that in the selection of the individuals I have paid particular attention to the pressing wants of the settlers.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient and very humble servant

Wm. PARKER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 374

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

5 Nov 1819

Sir,

I have had the honour to receive your letter of the 4th inst and now take leave to send you a fourth list with a list of the Military Pensioners who have joined my party of settlers for the Cape of Good Hope.

These lists should have been sent yesterday but I was obliged to attend the Middlesex Sessions on a subject which has caused me great distress.

Should Earl BATHURST be disposed to permit me to take with me some of the grown up children from the Foundling Hospital in Cork, which is heavily incumbered with them, his Lordship will render important service to the cause of humanity. Indeed on the perusal of the first Circular Letter I did imagine that a proposition of this kind would be most favourably received as one completely within the object of the late Parliamentary grant. The Governor of that excellent institution having assured me through the Lord Bishop of Cork and its chaplain the Rev'd Thomas COLE that they would be happy to place their children under my protection.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your very obedient and humble servant

Wm. PARKER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 380

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

10th November 1819

Sir,

I take leave to transmit to you lists of one hundred and twenty four able bodied men and their families who have engaged to proceed with me to the Cape of Good Hope pursuant to Lord BATHURST's acceptance of my proposal.

The first seventy of these families will be ready to embark in Cork Harbour on the arrival of the transports there and they are numbered from No.1 to No.70 inclusive. The other fifty four families will be ready to embark in the River Thames at as early a period as may be convenient to Government.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

Wm. PARKER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 382

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

12 November 1819

Sir,

I have received your letter of the 11th inst and regret very much that any difficulties of such an unforeseen nature should have occurred in respect to the settlers who have engaged to proceed with me to the Cape of Good Hope.

The uncertainty as to my place of location, which I contemplated would be on the Sea Coast, made all the seafaring persons who promised to accompany me from Cork Harbour withdraw, therefore I was forced to supply their places with agriculturalists and mechanics whom I have selected in London as time would not permit any further correspondence with Ireland.

I understood that the ships were to proceed from the River Thames to their Ports of Destination, therefore I presumed that there could be no difficulties in regard to such of the settlers who were ready to embark here proceeding in the ships to Cork, where those from Ireland would be ready to join them.

Indeed as I understood that the embarkation would be left to the Navy Board I did expect that every facility consistent with the public interests would be given to my party of settlers; I have full confidence that they will be pleased to remove any difficulty.

Sir, your most obedient humble servant

Wm. PARKER

[Transcriber's Note: below is the draft of GOULBURN's reply. This is a best guess as to how the final letter would have gone out. He obviously laboured over the wording as there are several pages of crossings out, re-worked paragraphs and insertions]

I have rec'd and laid before Lord B your letter of the 12th inst in which you refer to your request for permission to embark a large proportion of your settlers in the River Thames, which Lord B had considered objectionable, & express your expectation that every facility consistent with the public interest should be given to them. In reply I am directed to observe that a slight review of your communications with this office will satisfy you that whatever difficulties you may now labour under as to the embarkation of this party of settlers result entirely from your own mode of proceeding. You will remember that your original proposal was to take a body of settlers from Cork to the Cape of Good Hope & that you did not fail to enlarge upon the great advantage that Ireland would derive from the removal of her superabundant population. Your first proposal was actually accompanied by a variety of other inadmissible propositions to which Lord B gave an almost immediate reply but then had no reference to the ground upon which you were accepted, which was simply your engagement to take from Ireland the settlers who were to accompany you. Upon the plan of taking them from Ireland to the extent of above 100 families you were permitted to select a native of that country to accompany them as their minister. Nor have you ever until this moment given the slightest inclination of your wish to substitute for natives of Ireland, over whom you might be supposed, as you state yourself, to have some influence, a body of persons hastily collected in London of whom you can know but little & who are in many cases the very persons whose proposals to emigrate have already been considered and rejected by Lord B.

In applying the terms assigned by Parliament to the encouragement of emigration it became necessary to make a proportional distribution of it to all parts of the United Kingdom & if you have been included as settlers from Ireland it is entirely the result either of your own representations or of your own failure to notify the change which had subsequently taken place in your own intentions.

At the present advanced period it is not easy to make an alteration in the general arrangements but [understanding?] that the persons engaged by you in this country may necessarily be inconvenienced by being now prohibited from embarking, Ld.B. does not deem it proper to make them suffer on account of your irregularity and has therefore directed me to acquaint you that he will concede you as the leader of two separate parties, the one from London & the other from Cork, to be separately located on their arrival in the Colony, & will give orders for embarking your settlers accordingly; but as they are to be separately located you will observe that neither of the parties are sufficiently numerous to entitle them to the nomination of a minister

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 390

22 Nov 1819

Private

Mr. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. GOULBURN, takes leave to refer him to the letter of introduction which he had the honour to hand him, and to state that as Mr. GRANT is at present in the neighbourhood of London and as he has kindly promoted a negotiation with the Board of Customs in Ireland for a sale to them of part of Mr. PARKER's property in Cork harbour, he hopes that through Mr. GRANT's and Mr. VANSITTERT's favourable interposition it will be brought to an immediate conclusion, which will supply most useful funds for Mr. PARKER's undertaking.

In the mean time Mr. PARKER respectfully hopes that on his paying the sum of £500 to the Treasury, which shall be done this day, Mr. GOULBURN will be pleased to give directions for the embarkation of about fifty able bodied men with their families in this Port of London, along with the stores which Mr. PARKER has provided for them all at the Cape of Good Hope.

MR. PARKER on making the necessary arrangements for this purpose will proceed by Dublin to Cork and instantly remit to the Treasury the balance of his Deposits. In the meantime he trusts to Mr. GOULBURN to have the goodness to forward the transport to Cork with the remaining Forage for his settlers. Such stores for the use of the settlers and Mr. PARKER's large family are provided in London and should any arrangement prevent the ship that takes them in forwarding to Cork it would form a sad inconvenience to the entire party.

Mr. PARKER assures Mr.GOULBURN that he is not aware of any objectionable person being admitted in his list. But should any of the individuals whose names have been returned not be approved of by Lord BATHURST Mr. PARKER will do all in his power to exclude them and fill up their vacancies by persons in Ireland.

Doctor ROCHE, altho' his name is returned on Mr. PARKER's list, has very much disappointed him and as his accompanying the settlers has not been officially approved of by Lord BATHURST, Mr. PARKER would be glad to submit the name and qualifications of some other competent individual to his Lordship's consideration. But he should wish to select a Head Medical Attendant in Ireland.

The Rev'd Mr. McCLELAND, who has also been recommended by Mr. PARKER's friend the present Bishop of Raphoe, has arrived in London where Mr. PARKER recommended him to come for the purpose of establishing a correspondence with some of the excellent Public Institutions in London who have so generously and humanely afforded their assistance to Mr. PARKER's settlers. Disappointment to him would be dreadful.

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

23 Nov 1819

Mr. W. PARKER presents his compliments to Lord BATHURST, takes leave to refer his Lordship to Lord ROSSE's letter of introduction and to solicit the favour of an interview with him any day this week his Lordship pleases to appoint.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 402

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

30 Nov 1819

Mr. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. GOULBURN, takes leave to transmit a letter for the Earl BATHURST written in consequence of His Lordship's note.

Mr. PARKER avails himself of this opportunity that should the Lords of the Treasury not be pleased to advance [the] sum Mr. PARKER requires he shall be under the necessity of limiting for this season the number of his settlers to about 75. But should their Lordships on the very kind interposition of Mr. VANSITTERT, Mr. GRANT and Colonel BA[obscured] accede to the request, Mr. PARKER will immediately pay the required Deposit. If not Mr. PARKER most earnestly and respectfully hopes for the Earl BATHURST's permission for the remaining settlers to join him next year.

[note from GOULBURN at foot]

If Mr. PARKER's deposit is paid tomorrow Lord B will give directions for the embarkation of the number of persons for whom the deposit is paid, but will enter into no engagement as to any additional number proceeding next year.

[enclosed with above letter]

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 398

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

29 November 1819

My Lord,

In answer to your Lordship's note of the 24th inst I take leave to call your private consideration to the following observations.

Being honoured by your Lordship's acceptance of my proposal to take 124 able bodied men to the Cape of Good Hope I feel bound, as those individuals with all their wives and children place themselves under my care and protection, to in part perform the duty of a parent towards them and as far as in my power lies to provide for their personal safety and their future happiness and prosperity. Weighty objects which will I humbly trust apologize for this intrusion on your Lordship's time.

Inured from my earliest years to an active and industrious life and possessing the most respectable family connexions, many of whom have lost their lives in the service of their King and Country, I embarked largely in commercial pursuits and became at one period a considerable ship owner out of the Port of Cork. A property in shipping led to an extensive connexion with the West India Islands where in the year 1809 & 1810 I had a very large investment in the [parishes?] of Martinique and Guadeloupe.

One of your Lordship's Noble Predecessors in the Colonial Department, the Earl of LIVERPOOL and Mr. VANSITTERT well know the destructive operation of the Orders in Council of this property which scarcely left a wreck of thirty thousand pounds st for the support of an amiable wife and a large young family. To the distinguished personages whom I have named I can refer your Lordship for the truth of this statement, which is alone sufficient to elicit your generous sympathy and at least a wish to honour me with your countenance as a palliative for past misfortunes. But should your Lordship divest yourself of such friendly considerations the object which I now pursue is I presume adequate to attract your prompt and humane attention, so far as it regards the successful and happy colonization of Southern Africa under your Lordship's auspices.

Commerce, Agriculture and Nautical pursuits were at one period my avocations. In these I gave employment and support to at least 1000 individuals in Ireland. Many persons can bear testimony to my indefatigable exertions and my care and attention to the sick poor. These were in a great measure the cause of my own misfortunes.

I have thus learnt experience in the school of adversity and in the exercise of relief to such a large body of my distressed fellow creatures. Hence arise my qualifications to give a direction to industry and to provide for the multifarious wants of needy and distressed people – the cause of serious alarm to Government and such as were humanely contemplated to be relieved by the late Parliamentary grant.

The better to enable me to effect this I have offered to the Irish Government a part of my property in Ireland, which the Board of Customs there long contemplated purchasing and the delay in the arrangements for which has caused me great pain and anxiety.

This I am aware is an object [incidental?] to your Lordship's official department and I only state it by way of apology for the cause of my delay, but a [??] the kindness of the Lords of the Treasury or the representation of the Chancellor of the Exchequer and Mr. GRANT will I hope remove.

When I embarked on my present enterprize on reading Mr. VANSITTERT's humane speech in the House of Commons I was naturally led to make enquiries from those persons most capable of affording me information respecting the Cape of Good Hope. Among them Admiral Sir Josias ROWLEY, Mr GRANT the Irish Secretary with his worthy and benevolent father, Mr. BARROW, Mr. LATROBE, lastly Colonel WAIN and Mr. BURCHELL, all of whom travelled into the interior and along the Sea Coast & gave me the most valuable information.

They fixed my attention as a commercial man on the Harbour of the Knysna, and having heard several letters read from that brave and intelligent officer Sir [Jonathan?] BRUNTON, the Naval Commissioner at the Cape, lamenting the great want of a Coasting Trade along the extensive range of the Southern Coast of Africa, I became the more zealously inclined, notwithstanding the impediments I met with, to persevere in humbly soliciting your Lordship's kind recommendation to be located at the Knysna. Mr. BARROW has most strongly recommended to me said location. This my Lord, permit me to state, is an object of vital importance not only to the settlers who accompany me but to the Colony at large.

Colonel WAIN, from his situation as Adjutant General at the Cape, had [an?] opportunity of knowing where the unlocated lands were situated. He has assured me that at the West side of the Knysna all the lands are the property of the Crown except a small farm acquired by a Mr. BARNARD, and he has given me papers, that if I submitted to your Lordship a proper requisition on this subject that you would have the goodness to recommend to Lord Charles SOMERSET my being located at the Knysna or in case this was impracticable at Knysna Bay.

Now, as your Lordship was pleased to state in the first circular letter issued from the Colonial Department, in a manner so creditable to your considerable regard of the interests of your fellow creatures, that the wishes and interests of the settlers would be consulted, permit me as one of those to respectfully solicit your kind attention to this promise. My receiving any assurance from your Lordship of being located on the Sea Coast would immediately enable me to make commercial arrangements in London of vast importance to the interest of all the settlers in the entire Colony.

I have such an intelligent and respectable an individual as Mr. COLQUHOUN, who, to his great research and indefatigable exertions in the cause of suffering humanity has added the wisdom of experience, honours me with his friendship and advice. I feel the most confidence in the success of my exertions but particularly should I proceed to the Cape of Good Hope, recognized by your Lordship as an individual deserving your countenance.

Motives of humanity and a regard for human life also influence me to solicit your Lordship's attention to the personal protection of the Colonists. We live in vain if we do not benefit from experience. The melancholy but simple narratives of the Moravian Missionaries corroborated by the recent letters which Colonel WAIN sent to me from the Banks of the Great Fish River written by Military Officers who were engaged with the Caffres, are sufficient to daunt the most ardent from exposing themselves to the sudden irruptions of a savage foe on whose minds although depressed by the late chastisement of the British Troops no dependence can be placed.

Colonel WAIN from his high rank at the Cape, his accurate knowledge of the military strength of the Colony, is highly competent to afford your Lordship the most valuable information. In taking the liberty to mention the name of this excellent officer and referring your Lordship to him, I do so with his permission as it may under God be the necessary means of averting the evils so justly to be apprehended.

It is true, my Lord, that Mr. GOULBURN has stated that “the Government would extend every adequate protection to the Colonists at the Cape”. I have no doubt but that it is the wish of the Colonial Department and of His Excellency to do so; but circumstances may arise that may prevent him. Instances have occurred in Ireland where, notwithstanding its contiguity to Great Britain, many lives were lost in the absence of military protection. If this has been the case in a Christian country what may not happen in a region where Christianity and humanity have no influence?

Colonel WAIN has assured me that the number of Kings Troops at present at the Cape is unequal to give adequate protection to the Colonists in a Territory of such great extent. Indeed the unfortunate fate of the Moravian Missionaries is an incontrovertible proof of the correctness of Colonel WAIN's assertions. I therefore trust to your Lordship's enlightened and comprehensive mind to provide for the worst and to give confidence, animation and energy to the settlers at large. Thus will due and adequate protection be given and the Colony will be advanced under your Lordship's auspices to civilization and prosperity.

Let me most respectfully solicit your Lordship's kind indulgence and permit me to subscribe myself

Your Lordship's most obedient and very humble servant

Wm. PARKER

[Note from GOULBURN at foot]

Acknowledge receipt and acquaint him that as this application appears only to be a repetition of that which he made originally on ___ Lord B has only to refer him to the reply which I was then directed to make to him under date of ___

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 404

Mr. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. GOULBURN, takes leave to inclose Mr. ROBERT HOLDITCH's testimonials as a Surgeon and as he is very highly recommended by Alderman ATKINS to the Earl BATHURST hopes for his Lordship's permission to substitute Mr. HOLDITCH in the place of Doctor ROCHE, who has not fulfilled his promise to Mr. PARKER

30 Nov 1819

[note from GOULBURN: Have no objection to this person]

406 [enclosed with above]

Nov 23rd 1819

My Lord,

I can only corroborate the statement of Ald'n ATKINS in favor of Mr. HOLDITCH by saying that he was a diligent and attentive student at the hospitals to which I belong & that I believe him to be in every respect deserving of your Lordship's kindness.

I have the honor to remain

Your Lordship's obed't humble serv't

Astley COOPER

408 [enclosed with above]

Walbrook

22 Nov 1819

My Lord,

The bearer Mr. Robert HOLDITCH is a Surgeon and desirous of going out to the Cape of Good Hope with Mr. PARKER. Mr. HOLDITCH is recommended to me in the strongest manner for steadiness of conduct and gentlemanly deportment and that he will perform every professional duty committed to his charge in a manner creditably to himself and satisfactory to those who may come under his care. Mr. HOLDITCH is a loyal man, has recently taken up a weekly publication against the present order of reforming but did not answer his endeavours. I therefore beg to introduce him to your Lordship's notice and attention as a gentleman worthy of going out to the Cape according to his wish. He has a wife and two children.

I have the honor to be, my Lord

Your faithful humble servant

John ATKINS

410 [enclosed with above]

Hammersmith

Middlesex

Nov 21st 1819

I certify that Mr. Rob't HOLDITCH served a regular apprenticeship with me at Plymouth in Devonshire as Surgeon and Apothecary, during the whole of which period he conducted himself with the greatest degree of fidelity and is fully entitled to my warmest praises and recommendation, both in respect to his professional abilities and deportment as a gentleman.

John H. BRIDGEMAN MD

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 413

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

1 December 1819

Sir,

Herewith be pleased to receive lists in triplicate of seventy five able bodied men with their families willing to proceed with me to the Cape of Good Hope.

The Deposits for these individuals amount to eight hundred and fifty five pounds, which should be found correct. I am prepared to pay at the Treasury at a moment's notice.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your obedient and very humble st.

Wm PARKER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 415

No.10 Adam Street, Adelphi

3 December 1819

Mr. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. SMITH, would be obliged if he could with convenience add the name of Wm. OSBORNE, baker, aged 24, Elizabeth OSBORNE his wife aged 20 and Elizabeth aged 1 to his list of settlers, for which the deposit of £10 st is enclosed.

Mr. PARKER hopes that Mr. SMITH will pardon this trouble, as two families are proceeding with him that are intimately connected with OSBORNE, from whom they didn't wish to separate.

[note signed PS overleaf]

His money returned and himself informed that Mr. GOULBURN could not sanction his application.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 419

10 Adam Street, Adelphi

Saturday ev 4 o'clock

4 December 1819

Sir,

I have the honour to inclose a letter this moment received from the Commissioners of the Navy and apprehend some fatality has happened in regard to the instructions for [persons?] to be forwarded respecting the transport for the settlers proceeding under my direction to the Cape of Good Hope.

I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

Wm. PARKER

421 [enclosed with above – to William PARKER Esq]

Navy Office

4th Dec 1819

Sir,

In return to your letter of this date enclosing three lists of settlers said to be proceeding under your Direction from London and Cork to the Cape of Good Hope, I am commanded by the Commissioners of the Navy to inform you that the Albury and Sir George Osborne Transports are fitting at Portsmouth for the conveyance of the Emigrants from Cork to the Cape of Good Hope, but that Earl BATHURST has not communicated to them that any of the Heads of Parties to embark at Cork are to be allowed to embark a portion of their number in England and therefore the 49 families that you state to be ready to embark in the River Thames cannot be provided for until they receive His Lordship's Directions for that purpose. I am also to observe that although the Commissioners have been informed by Earl BATHURST that it was His Lordship's intention to permit a Party of Emigrants to proceed to the Cape of Good Hope under your direction, they have not yet received His Lordship's instructions actually to provide for your Party.

I am Sir

Your most obedient servant

R. NELSON

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 423

10 Adam Street, Adelphi

11 December 1819

Mr. PARKER presents his compliments to Mr. GOULBURN, begs leave to inform him that he understands that the Earl BATHURST has given some Gentleman a letter of recommendation to join his party of settlers on board the East Indian and that he called several times at Mr. PARKER's lodgings.

Mr. PARKER assures Mr. GOULBURN that he will be at all times gratified in complying with any design of his Lordship's or Mr. GOULBURN's and the individual recommended can proceed with Mr. PARKER's settlers from London to Cork. On the East Indian's arrival in Cork arrangements can then be entered into between the individual recommended by His Lordship & Mr. PARKER.

Mr. PARKER proceeds to Passage West, Ireland by this night's Holyhead Mail, where Mr. GOULBURN will be pleased to address any communication for him.

As Mr. WOODCOCK, one of Mr. PARKER's settlers, has been obliged to proceed to Ireland, Mr. PARKER has deputed Mr. D.P. FRANCIS to take the temporary direction of the settlers to Cork.

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 425

Passage West

Ireland

23 December 1819

Sir,

I have the honour to inform you of my arrival here where I wait the appearance of the East Indian from the Thames to embark with my family and settlers for the Cape of Good Hope.

On examining the settlers who have joined my party from the County of Longford I find that there is a Military Pensioner among them, namely John ARMSTRONG, late Private of the 6th Battalion of the 60th Regiment of Foot, who was admitted an Out Pensioner of Chelsea Hospital on the 4th Feb 1810 at 1/1 per day. This man has this day written to the Paymaster Chelsea Pensions stating his intention of emigrating with me to the Cape of Good Hope. I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient and very humble servant

Wm. PARKER

 

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National Archives, Kew CO48/45, 427

Passage West

25th December 1819

Sir,

Since I had the honour of addressing you on the 23rd inst respecting John ARMSTRONG, a Military Pensioner, I find that Sarah ROBERTS, aged 24, one of the settlers proceeding with me to the Cape of Good Hope, since my returns were made got married to William ROBERTS, aged 27 years a carpenter, who had a child named John ROBERTS aged 15 months.

A Deposit of £10 being paid for the woman, I hope that the Earl BATHURST will be pleased to allow her husband to be added to my list of settlers and give the necessary instructions accordingly.

I need not tell you the peculiar difficulties which attend an expedition of this kind and of the many changes likely to occur from the mutability of human affairs. As distress has unquestionably been the strongest impulse to the Emigration to the Cape of Good Hope I must fear that pressing embarrassments may detain some of the settlers who engaged to embark in the Thames, altho' I paid the deposits required and otherwise advanced them money to relieve them from their difficulties. Should this be the case I must respectfully hope that the Earl BATHURST will be pleased to permit me to substitute in Ireland others in lieu on the East Indian's arrival in this Harbour.

I have strong reason to suppose that ill health and pecuniary difficulties may prevent an individual already approved of by the Earl BATHURST proceeding to the Cape in the Fanny, which ship is now in this harbour. Should this be the case I take leave to offer to supply the deficiency of the Fanny's complement of settlers and to remove the difficulties that may occur.

Be pleased to assure the Earl BATHURST that I shall pay the strictest attention to enforce the excellent regulations for the conduct of the settlers on board ship as a due observance of them will be conducive to the health and comfort of the individuals proceeding under my direction. I have the honour to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

Wm. PARKER

[Note at foot: Mr. PARKER has been directed to return the Govt. letter]

 

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[filed under F in CO48/43]

National Archives, Kew CO48/43, 255

26 Dec 1819

Will'm NORMAN Labourer 36 years of age

Jane his wife 33 one child Maria 8 yrs of age

In the room of Henry HUNT & his wife

Will'm DOUGLAS Bricklayer 39 years of age

In the room of Jonathan THORNTON

George HAWKS Ropemaker 21 years of age

In the room of Henry BEAVER

John JOBSON has no child. May not NORMAN's child be placed in the room of JOBSON's

Mr. Will'm PARKER

Passage near Cork

West Ireland

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