Grahamstown Journal

Grahamstown Journal 1888 11 November

Thursday 1 November 1888

BIRTH on November 1st at Grahamstown, the wife of Rev. Ben. IMPEY of a daughter.

BIRTH at Lansdown Lodge, Grahamstown, Oct 28th, the wife of Mr. R. Restall STOCKS of a son.

Saturday 3 November 1888

DIED at Grahamstown on the 3rd November 1888, Arthur Lancelot Wynne, infant son of A.G. and B. HATCHARD, aged 9 months.

DEATH OF MR. J.W. ASHBURNHAM
Very widespread regret was manifested yesterday morning (the Argus says) when a report, which proved only too true, became current that Mr. J.W.ASHBURNHAM, Secretary to the South African Fire Assurance Company, had died after a very brief illness at Pretoria. Mr. ASHBURNHAM left town two or three weeks ago in his usual health, and was expected to return in the course of a few days. Letters were received from him only on Saturday, in which there was no mention of his being unwell; but a telegram received yesterday morning states that he died at Pretoria, after a brief attack of inflammation of the lungs. Mr. ASHBURNHAM, who married a daughter of the late Bishop MERRIMAN, was for many years in the service of the Cape of Good Hope Bank. He was an accomplished vocalist and skilled player of chess, and was in fact a many-sided man – of a class of whom we have far too few in our midst. He was universally respected, and his death will be greatly mourned by all to whom he was known.

Tuesday 6 November 1888

BIRTH at Grahamstown on 4th Nov, wife of Denison L. CLARKE of a daughter.

DIED at her residence, Bathurst-street, Grahamstown, on the 5th November 1888, in her 70th year, Mrs. John RICHARDS Sen, relict of the late Mr. John RICHARDS of HM Commissariat Department.
The Funeral of Mrs. RICHARDS will leave her late residence, Bathurst-street, on Wednesday morning at 8 o’clock. All friends of the family are invited to attend.

MR.JNO. JOLLY
Our readers will be interested to hear that Mr. Jno. JOLLY, formerly of this city, has been appointed to the Managership of the Golden Kopje Mine and Battery, Johannesburg.

Thursday 8 November 1888

OBITUARY
We regret that it our painful duty to chronicle the demise of Mrs. Jno. RICHARDS Sen, who died in her 70th year at her house in Bathurst St. on Monday last after a protracted and tedious illness, which called for all her Christian parlance and powers of endurance. The funeral took place yesterday morning. The sons and daughters of the deceased lady have our sincere sympathy in their bereavement.

Saturday 10 November 1888

BIRTH at Grahamstown on the 10th inst, the wife of William GLISSON of a daughter.

Tuesday 13 November 1888

OBITUARY
The public were startled yesterday morning to hear that a well-known and respected fellow-townsman, Mr. W. DENT Sen, had suddenly fallen dead at an early hour. Mr. DENT was apparently all right on Sunday, having been at the cathedral service in the evening, and he did not complain of any ailment before retiring to bed that night. In the morning he rose as usual before six o’clock, dressed himself, and opened the shop. He then went into the sitting room, where the sad event happened. Mrs. DENT was quickly on the spot, and having managed to get him on the sofa, endeavoured to administer some wine, and summoned medical assistance, which was speedily forthcoming. All was however in vain, as he only lived a few minutes after the attack came on. The cause of death was heart disease. Deceased, who was as well known as any man in town, was sent by some friends to this Colony in 1834 from India, where his father (who was in the Indian army) and his mother had previously died. His grandmother, Mrs. GOODWIN, was known to be at Capetown, and deceased brought a letter to Mr. MACKAY, father Mr. D. MACKAY of this town, requesting that gentleman to find her. This he did, and till 1856 grandmother and grandson lived together, the latter supporting the former. After Mrs. GOODWIN’s death Mr. DENT moved to Grahamstown about 31 years ago, and has remained in business here ever since, deservedly respected for his uprightness and integrity of purpose. Though evidently in failing health of late, deceased had not complained to any of his friends on the subject; and his startlingly sudden demise has been a great shock to them. Mr. DENT, who was in his 67th year, leaves a widow, two daughters and five sons to mourn their loss. One son is at the Bay, two at Kimberley, and a fourth in Bechuanaland, so that though telegraphed for, only one could be present at the funeral which took place this morning. We join with the many friends and acquaintances in tendering sincere condolences to the bereaved ones.

Thursday 15 November 1888

GOLDEN WEDDING
Today, Tuesday (says the Free Press) the Rev. H.H. DUGMORE and Mrs. DUGMORE celebrate the 50th anniversary of their wedding day. This venerable clergyman was in Queenstown some time before any other minister of any other church, and has resided here almost uninterruptedly ever since. Endeared as he is to all, of whatever denomination, we feel sure that those who are acquainted with him and Mrs. DUGMORE will join us in offering our heartiest congratulations on this happy occasion which we cordially tender them, trusting that God may yet give them many years to further enjoy their peaceable and happy life together.

THE LATE MR. GORMAN
Kaffrarian people will be sorry to learn that Major L. GORMAN, of the old Kaffrarian Rangers, has just died in Johannesburg of inflammation of the lungs, after a short illness. The deceased (says the Digger’s News) was a native of Dundee, Scotland, and had been many years in the Colony. After the Gaika-Galeka war he resided in East Griqualand. He also took part in the Zulu war. It may be mentioned that he recently lost some valuable claims by jumping, the case being still in the recollection of our readers as GORMAN v ATTWELL.

Saturday 17 November 1888

DIED at his residence, Bathurst-street, Grahamstown, November 12th, William DENT, aged 67 years.
The family of the late William DENT wish to tender their most sincere thanks to the many friends who so kindly assisted during their sad bereavement.

REGISTER OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS
It will have been noticed in our report of the last meeting of the Town Council that the Under Colonial Secretary had written urging the Council to legislate in the matter of a compulsory registration of Births and Deaths. The question is an important one, and deals with what has long been felt to be an urgent necessity, so it is to be hoped that the Police Committee to whom it was referred will decide for such a compulsory registration.

GOLDEN WEDDING
We (Witness) congratulate Sir Theophilus and Lady SHEPSTONE on their attainment of their golden wedding, and trust that they will be spared to reach a further celebration of the hymeneal landmark. Sir Theophilus SHEPSTONE has had a long and varied experience in South Africa, and after a life’s work is happy in being able to seek rest in the bosom of a large family of children and grandchildren.

Tuesday 20 November 1888

WIFE-BEATING
At the Kimberley magistrate’s Court last week an extraordinary case of wife-beating was heard by the A.R.M. Mr. LONSDALE. The accused gave his name as Frederick JOSEPHS, and pleaded guilty to having beaten his wife with a sjambok, and to knocking her down five or six times with his fists. Sentence of three months’ imprisonment with hard labour, without the option of affine, was inflicted.

Thursday 22 November 1888

DEATH OF THE MAYOR OF GRAHAMSTOWN
Another addition to the sad series of deaths by which this community has recently been bereaved of some of its best and foremost citizens, took place early on Wednesday morning, when our esteemed and respected Mayor, Mr. George LUKE, breathed his last. It had been noticed that the excitement of the election had somewhat told upon his strength and appearance, but no-one imagined that he was even ill, inasmuch as he was in good spirits and in his usual activity in his business and municipal duties. It was not until Saturday afternoon that he became seriously unwell, with internal pain caused by a severe attack of enteric inflammation. On Monday towards the evening he was decidedly worse, and his physicians, after consultation, resolved upon an operation. Even then the patient was so much reduced in strength that the success of any such attempt was extremely doubtful, but as it appeared to give a slender chance of saving life it was resorted to, with the entire consent of the sufferer. The operation was, however, from the nature of the disease as at once disclosed by it, ineffectual in producing any improvement; and the patient sank during the night, expiring very quietly about half past one o’clock. He was in full consciousness to the last, and was able to bid farewell to his wife. His only daughter, Mrs. HOCKEY, had been sent for, but living near Fort Brown did not arrive in time to see her parent in life. The Rev. G.W.CROSS, the deceased’s pastor, was constant in his attendance during the final hours of Mr. LUKE’s life.
It is an unprecedented circumstance in our civic history that we should lose by death one who at the same time was Mayor, and a Member of Parliament for the City. These honours speak for themselves, and show the unusual esteem in which Mr. LUKE was held by the inhabitants of Grahamstown. He was, we believe, a native of Birmingham, but had resided in this Colony many years, during all which time he has carried on business in Grahamstown. As a man of business he was diligent, honourable and successful. No reproach attached itself to his name. He was a prominent member of the Baptist Church, and his life was that of a sincere and devout Christian. He had been connected with Municipal matters since 1874, and was serving a second term of office as Mayor at the time of his decease. He was always active in promoting the welfare and improvement of the City; and he had well and thoroughly earned the further mark of confidence which his fellow citizens showed when at the recent election they returned him as one of their Representatives in the House of Assembly. In this new capacity we had every hope that he might from his characteristic intelligence and public spirit be able to render further valuable service both to his townsmen and to the Colony. This hope was not to be realised; and in the sudden stroke which has deprived us all of an honoured friend, we can but bow submissively to the decision of a wise though mysterious Providence.
Universal regret and concern were felt throughout the town when the tolling of St.George’s bell intimated the death of our Chief Citizen, and the utmost sympathy was evinced for the bereaved relatives. The funeral of Mr. LUKE takes place this afternoon at 3 o’clock, most of the places of business being closed from 2:30 till 4:30pm.

A CENTENARIAN
Mr. J. H. POTGIETER of Modder Fontein, district Philipstown, will, if he lives until December 1 proximo, have attained his 100th year. He eats, drinks and sleeps well and takes long walks. He has been a smoker of tobacco for very many years. In the Zuid Afrikaan he invites all relations and family connections to assemble at Modder Fontein on December 1 to celebrate his centenary.

Saturday 24 November 1888

DIED at his residence, George-street, on the 21st November 1888, George LUKE M.L.A. and Mayor of Grahamstown, aged 52 years.

[Transcriber’s Note: This edition also has an extremely lengthy description of George LUKE’s funeral, taking up two full columns, with extracts from the funeral address, but largely contains the same information as the obituary already transcribed]

DIED on November 21st 1888, at the residence of her Son Richard at Cathcart Vale, Stockenstrom, Elizabeth, widow of the late Samuel OATES, aged 65 years.

DIED at Grahamstown on Saturday the 24th Nov 1888, Mr. Thomas CUNNINGHAM, of Mossel Bay, aged 52 years.
The Funeral of the later Mr. CUNNINGHAM will move from the Masonic Temple, Hill-street, tomorrow (Sunday) at 4 pm. Members of Albany Lodge, St.John’s Lodge and St.Andrew’s Lodge are invited to meet at the Temple at 3:30. Friends of the deceased will also start from there.
A.WILL
Undertaker

Tuesday 27 November 1888

DIED at Grahamstown on Sunday 25th November, Leslie Valentine, only and dearly beloved son of William and Amy CARTWRIGHT, aged 3 years [9] months and 21 days.
Earth to earth and dust to dust,
Calmly now the words we say,
Leaving him to sleep in trust
Till the resurrection day.
Mr. and Mrs. CARTWRIGHT beg to tender their sincere thanks to Drs. GREATHEAD and FLIGG, and to Mrs. WEBB, Mrs. WILMOT and Mrs. MORTON, for their kind attention during the illness of their dear little one.

Thursday 29 November 1888

DROWNED at River View, Witmoss, Great Fish River, whilst bathing, on Monday 26th November, Minnie Tucker, eldest daughter of Louis Henry and Lilly TROLLIP, aged 14 years and 5 months.

THE FATAL DISSELBOOM
The Frontier Guardian reports that Mr. GRAVETT was travelling with a wagon laden with wheat from Xalanga to [.....hoek]. When near the [illegible] he must have slipped whilst getting upon the wagon by means of the disselboom, and the wheel passed over his chest, causing death in a few hours.

DEATH FROM CANCER
The Independent regrets to have to record the death of Mr. John Larkin FRY, who for several years was Chief of the Detective Department of the Colony. Mr. FRY was an old resident on the Fields; he was well known and respected, and his death will be deeply regretted by a large circle of friends. Deceased was at the Carnarvon Hospital for several months suffering from a cancer in the cheek, and his death was not unexpected.

SAD DROWNING FATALITY
We much regret to learn that on Monday last while five children of Mr. Louis H. TROLLIP of Whitmoss, with their governess, were bathing in the Fish River, two of the children, who were a little distance from the others, suddenly got out of their depth. They screamed out for help, when the governess and another child rushed to them, and each clutching the other were all drawn together under the water. The mother, Mrs. TROLLIP and a native maid, who were close by on the bank, saw them sink and rushed into the water. The mother gave a hand each to the governess and one of the children, and succeeded in drawing them out. The maid helped another out with a stick, but the fourth (a child of 14) lost her hold of the others, got beyond their help, and was drowned. The body was found after being in the water 40 minutes. Life could not be restored.

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