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Grahamstown Journal

Grahamstown Journal 1900 02 February

Thursday 1 February 1900

NOTICE
From this date the undersigned will not be responsible for any Debts contracted in the name of FLETCHER & DALZIEL, formerly Bakers, in High-street. The Partnership hitherto existing has been dissolved, and business will be carried on solely by the undersigned.
E.J. DALZIEL
February 1 1900.

ESCAPING PRISONER SHOT
Sapper ALLISTON, one of the Post Office Rifles, writing from De Aar, relates an incident after the battle of Belmont: “Yesterday 40 or 50 prisoners, including a field-cornet, went through in open trucks, guarded by about a dozen Munster Fusiliers with fixed bayonets and loaded rifles. After leaving this station one made a dash for liberty, throwing his guard out of the truck and jumping, but immediately he was on terra firma eight bullets were in him, causing instant death. He was buried along the line.”

Friday 2 February 1900

DR. BERRY’S RESIGNATION
Queenstown, Thursday (Reuter):
Dr. BERRY, the Speaker, who for a great number of years has occupied the post of Senior Medical Officer of the Frontier Hospital, has resigned. The Committee’s acceptance of same was announced at the annual meeting last night, and a cordial vote of thanks was passed in acknowledgement of his long valued services.

Saturday 3 February 1900

BRABANT’S DIVISION – RECRUITS WANTED
Lieut. J.W. COCK has opened a Recruiting Office in Church-square, next to Mr. ANDREW, Chemist, where all particulars can be ascertained.

BIRTH at Riet Vley, Steynsburg, on 28th Jan, the wife of G.H. FORD of a son.

FOUND DEAD
On Thursday the 18th inst [recte ult] a shepherd on the farm Koenicklag, about nine miles from Montagu, mad a startling discovery. In a secluded spot among a clump of trees he saw the body of a man suspended from a branch. The man was fully dressed, and had his hat and boots on. On approaching nearer, the shepherd noticed that the eyes were hollow, the cheeks sunken, the skin yellow and parched, and that the clothes hung loosely on the body. He reported the matter, and the corpse was identified as that of a poor farmer named Barend VELDTMAN, who left his home fully eighteen months ago with an axe and a helm. He told his wife at the same time that she would never see him again. Pinching poverty is supposed to have been the cause of the rash deed.

A MOTHER’S SUICIDE
A terrible tragedy took place in the Stutterheim district a few weeks ago, when Mrs. Christoffel BOTHA committed suicide by shooting herself with a fowling piece. The unfortunate woman was thirty years old, and the mother of five children, the youngest of whom is a baby a few months old.

KIMBERLEY’S MEMORIAL
A column is to be erected at Kimberley in commemoration of the siege.

FIRE! FIRE!
Yesterday morning before daybreak Mr. J.H. WEBBER of Market-square was aroused from slumber by Mr. PINNOCK, one of his employees, who was going to work, and who had seen smoke issuing from a shed in the yard of the dwelling-house. Mr. WEBBER did not take very long to investigate the matter, and found that a lot of bales of chaff and loose chaff were alight, and two bales were already burnt. With the assistance of his sons, Mr. WEBBER got buckets of water, and by diligently pouring it on, and scattering the combustibles, the smouldering fire was put out, not, however, before a large hole had been burnt in the wooden floor. A little while longer and the whole row of sheds and the dwelling-house would have been on fire, and the damage done would have been very great. It was due to Mr. WEBBER’s exertions that a disastrous fire was averted. How or when the fire originated is an undiscoverable mystery.

Monday 5 February 1900

We learn that during the late Mr. Reuben AYLIFF’s last illness he with characteristic kindness desired that fruits should be sent up to the troops at the front. Since then and for two months past the Misses AYLIFF have been sending parcels of fruit from time [sic] to Moddder River, Orange River &c, and have found these presents most thankfully received, as there is no fruit on the spot. Our district fruits carries well, pines, apples &c, and the Railway charges no carriage to such parcels for the troops. The plan is certainly one which could well be imitated.

Corporal T.H. TARR of Nesbitt’s Horse has a record to be proud of. He has had four sons on Active Service, while he is himself expecting to be ordered to the Front with his Regiment at any moment. One of his sons is in the Prince Alfred’s Guards, one with Col. PLUMER, one was in the Cape Police, but unfortunately died from enteric fever in Kimberley, while the fourth is with his father in Nesbitt’s Horse.

Mr. William ATTWELL, who was once of Salem, but now of Johannesburg, is himself a conductor in the Imperial Transport, and his four sons are in Nesbitt’s Horse. Three of the young ATTWELLs are over 6 ft. 1 inch, and the fourth is 6 ft. The one, Corporal Percy ATTWELL, was picked as one of Lord ROBERTS’s Bodyguard, though for certain reasons he could not accept the proud post.

Miss Ida FRANKLIN, eldest daughter of our esteemed fellow townsman, Mr. Geo. FRANKLIN, being anxious to do something for her country, leaves tomorrow for De Aar, where she has received an appointment on the Army Nursing Staff.

Tuesday 6 February 1900

NEBITT’S HORSE- DEPARTURE FOR THE FRONT
AN ENTHUSIASTIC SEND-OFF
Yesterday was a memorable day for Grahamstown, inasmuch as it marked the departure to the scene of action of Nesbitt’s Horse. The men were busy preparing all day long, and in the afternoon at about 5 o’clock the horses were all trucked. There was a tremendous crowd at the Railway Station n the evening to see the men off. The crush was so terrible that one had great difficulty in getting from one end of the station to the other. The men all seemed in the very best of spirits, and marched on to the platform singing patriotic songs.
After the men had taken their places in the carriages, everybody pushed forward to bid them farewell, and such sayings as “Good old Albany”, “Give it to them hot” &c &c were shouted out by the crowd.
The train steamed out of the station at about 9 o’clock, leaving the crowd in the rear, shouting for all they were worth, while the men continued waving their hats until long after the first report of “Fog signals” was heard.
It is generally understood that the men, who number in all 100, are to join Brabant’s Division, and a smarter [bit] of men it would be hard to find. Their Colonel speaks very highly of the men all round. There have been no defaulters, and the men’s conduct has always been good. Colonel NESBITT is to be congratulated on the efficiency of the men in their drill, and on the splendid body they are as a whole.
The Officers selected to stay behind with the remnant who did not volunteer for the front are Colonel NESBITT, and Capt. and Adjutant Noel NESBITT, and Capt. GIRDLESTONE (Paymaster).
The following are the names of the officers and men of Nesbitt’s Horse who left last night for the front.
Major CURRIE, Lieut. LEARY, Lieut. T. COCK
Sergts. CLOVER, J., COCK, Thos., GRADWELL, I.
Corpls. ATTWELL, R.P., TARR, T.H., WILSON, J.
Act. Cp. AMM, R., COBURN, Jas., BRINK, W.
Troopers;
AMOS, Josh.
AMM, Ben.
ATTWELL, G.
AMM, A.P.
AMM, P.
AMM, S.E.
ATHERSTONE, C.
BEADLE, Chas.
BERRINGTON, D.W.
BETTINGTON, E.
BECKWITH, Chas.
BROWNE, M.
BUTT, A.
CAMPBELL, D.
COMMINS, J.
CLACK W.
COOK, R.J.
CUMMINGS, S.A.
CURRIE, R.
CORDER E.A.
DOLD, D.
DEMAINE, L,
FIELD, E.W.
FRANKLIN, V.
GETTIE, W.
GIBSON, M.
GRAY, S.
GRAY, F.
GRAVETT, R.
GIBSON M.C.
HILL, E.
HILL, H.D.
HAYES, C.
HARTLEY, J.
HORTON, A.
JONES, J.
KEETON, R.
KEETON, L.
KING, C.
KING, A.
LARKIN, H.
LARKIN, W.
LONG, J.C.
LONG, C.
MURRAY, S.
McGORRIE, A.
McGARR, W.
McDONALD, D.
McLELLAN, S.
NASH, R.
OSBORNE, J.
OATES, J.V.
PANNELL, D.
PENNY, C.T.
PACKMAN, T.
POULTON, C.
REILLY, E.
REID, M.
ROBERTSON, W.D.
SHAMROCK, C.
STAPLES, W.J.
SHAND, K.
SURMON, G.W.
SLATER, H.
STEWART, G.
SHAW, B.
SHAW, D.
STEWART, C.C.
SHORT, G.
STANTON, W.
TARR, H.M.
TALBOT, J.
TOPPER, G.
VERITY, E.
WATRIDGE, L.
WATRIDGE, F.
WALLACE, R.
WEWEGE, J.
WATERS, E.
Bathurst:
Corpl. DUGMORE
Troopers COUSINS, COOPER, FINN, GRADWELL, DUGMORE, SMAILES, GOLDSWAIN, WEBB, S.E., WEBB, F.G.
Besides these there are the following officers at Cookhouse ready to entrain this afternoon with about 100 men from Bedford, Adelaide and Fort Beaufort Districts:-
Capt. HANNA, Lieut. MILDENHALL, Lieut. LAURIE, Lieut. HANNA

Wednesday 7 February 1900

AN OLD COLONIST
The death is notified of George SEYMOUR, of Malvern, well known as an old colonist and pioneer of the fruit growing industry. He was 85 years of age. He was 23 years head gardener to the Duke of St.Alban’s before coming to the colony, and has nearly 40 years in Natal.

Friday 9 February 1900

LIST OF CASUALTIES
Capetown, Friday (Reuter)
The following casualties are officially communicated, Sterkstroom, sixth:
Brabant’s Horse
Missing
Sergt. H.J. CLARKE
Tprs.
BOARDMAN
DARNIER
HOLMES
BECKER
BALLOCK
HALLECOMBE
Cape Mounted Rifles
Missing
No. 521 Pte. RANKIN
Kimberley
No, 236 of the Town Guard
Thomas BUTLER died of typhoid fever on 2nd February.

Monday 12 February 1900

BIRTH at Nazaar, Feb 7th 1900, the wife of G.A. GUSH of a daughter.

It is rumoured that W.M. EDWARDS – the Komgha renegade – has been shot, and Dan KETTLES, a well known Kabousie farmer, has been shot up at Mafeking.

Tuesday 13 February 1900

A GALLANT GRENADIER
The bravery of a private of the Grenadier Guards stands out prominently. During the thick of the fight at Belmont, Colonel CRABBE, commanding the Grenadiers, became detached from his regiment, and was immediately surrounded by Boers. Seeing the Colonel’s danger, the private rushed to his assistance. He shot two Boers, bayonetted a third, and amidst the firing carried Col. CRABBE to the ambulance wagon. The Colonel was shot in the wrist and injured in the thigh, and these were the wounds he described as scratches when wiring the result of the battle to Windsor. He was soon about again, and recommended the Guardsman for the Victoria Cross. The man was one of the first Grenadiers who volunteered from Windsor to join the 3rd Battalion.
[Transcriber’s Note: Although not named, the Guardsman was Private FITZMAURICE]

Mr. Charles RICHARDS, late of Fort Beaufort, has met with a railway accident. One finger was cut off and one crushed by the buffers of a carriage.

Mrs. B. HARVEY of Cuyler-street, Uitenhage, received news from the Transvaal last week to the effect that her brother had been killed on the Boer side in the Elandslaagte battle.

Wednesday 14 February 1900

DEATH OF MR. BOTTEN
It is our sad duty to relate the death of Mr. John BOTTEN, who has been in the employ of the Town Council for over 20 years, and has proved himself a faithful servant. Some time back he caught cold while putting out a fire near the reservoir, which settled on his chest and has been troubling him for fully 12 months past. He passed away last night about 12 o’clock. The deceased, who was 72 years of age, celebrated his golden wedding some two or three years ago.

At Chelsea, Colonel GOLDIE, who had a son in the war, was attending a meeting. Suddenly in the middle of the meeting the father got up and said he must go home, for he had a presentiment that his son had been killed. The went home: the presentiment was only too true: a telegram awaited the unfortunate officer to announce the death f his son at Modder River.

Twin sisters of Cecil RHODES are now at Kimberley. It is due to them that their famous brother no longer avoids women so persistently as of yore. The two girls – healthy, athletic specimens of English young womanhood – own between them a vast fortune in diamonds given to them by their brother, but neither uses the gems for personal adornment.

Mr. James USHER of Kokstad, who has just died, was one of the oldest settlers of this territory, having arrived here in the early sixties. He was an Albany Settler of 1820, having arrived in the Colony when only five years of age. His early life was spent near Peddie, and the family name is well represented throughout South Africa. He has gone to rest at the ripe age of 85, and the sympathy of the whole community is with his sorrowing wife and family, who live in the Kokstad district.

Thursday 15 February 1900

DIED at Grahamstown on Wednesday February 14 1900, after a long illness, John BOTTEN, aged 72 years,
FUNERAL NOTICE
The funeral of the late Mr. BOTTEN will leave his residence, near the Grey Reservoir, at 9£0 on Friday morning, arriving at the Cathedral at 10:30. Friends are respectfully invited to attend.
A. WILL
Undertaker

Estate of the late Robert Willamott KEMSLEY of Grahamstown
All Claims against the above Estate must be sent in to the undersigned on or before the 3rd April 1900; and all Debtors are required to pay by the same date.
T. Barry VAN DER RIET
Attorney for the Executrix Dative

COL. EAGAR’S DEATH
Sterkstroom, Wednesday (Reuter):
Col. EAGAR died yesterday morning at Burghersdorp. About a fortnight ago Dr. DICKERSON was allowed to go to Burghersdorp to attend Col. EAGAR, and remained with him until the last. It will be remembered that Col. EAGAR commanded the Royal Irish Rifles at the Stormberg fight, and was then very badly wounded, but had a month ago so far recovered that the Doctors considered him out of danger. Recently fever appears to have set in and brought about his death.
The body was brought in from Burghersdorp to a place south of Stormberg, thence by cart to Molteno, and thence by armoured train to Sterkstroom Camp this morning.
A fully representative and impressive Military Funeral was accorded to the deceased officer this afternoon, led by the Royal Irish Rifles: then followed the body on a gun carriage surmounted by the Union Jack, and a large number of wreaths, the Northumberland Fusiliers... [rest of paragraph illegible].

In the Estate of the late Henry ESTMENT of Grahamstown
All Persons claiming to be Creditors the above Estate are requested to file their claims with, and those indebted thereto to pay their Debts to the undersigned, at his Office, in Grahamstown, within six weeks from this date.
Lorimer B. DOLD
Attorney for Executrix Testamentary
Grahamstown29th January 1900

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND DEBTORS
In the Estate of the late Edward James CURRAN of Grahamstown
All Persons claiming to be Creditors the above Estate are requested to file their claims with, and those indebted thereto to pay their Debts to the undersigned, within six weeks from this date.
STONE & Son
Attorneys for Executrix Testamentary
Grahamstown
8th February 1900

Friday 16 February 1900

We are very sorry to hear that Major DOVETON, of the Imperial Light Horse, died in Ladysmith on Wednesday 14th. Mrs. DOVETON was in time to be with him at the last, having been allowed by General JOUBERT to pass the Boer lines.

DEATH OF A POLICEMAN
At Herschel a Cape policeman, named FORNDELL, died very suddenly on Friday from inflammation of the bowels. The funeral was largely attended by the force and civilians. The missionary from Wittebergen officiated.

Saturday 17 February 1900

DEATH OF MR. BENNETT
The Free Press records the death of Mr. Jonathan BENNETT, of Shepstone Street, Queenstown, under circumstances of a somewhat unusual character, his body being found under a tree in the Public Gardens. Mr. BENNETT was one of four who were in the Imperial Army and who took their discharge at Queenstown about 40 years ago. He was 73 years of age. He was at one time in business as a hairdresser in Cathcart Road. Death, it appears, was due to syncope.

DEATH OF MAJOR DOVETON
Maritzburg, Friday (Reuter):
He news of the successful operations on the western border, and of the relief of Kimberley, was received here with the liveliest satisfaction, and flags were hoisted in honour of the event. All is quiet at the front. The traction engines at the front proved a great success. Some of them bear bullet marks sustained while dragging guns into position, The speed at which they travelled with a train of wagons was surprising. They are objects of much curiosity.
Major DOVETON, who succumbed at Ladysmith to injuries received in the engagement on the 6th Jan, was manager of the Main Road Gold Mining Co., and one of the best known men on the Rand. He took a leading part in the Reform Committee. Shortly before the present war broke out he resigned his position as manager of the mine, and [ ing] down to Maritzburg, joined the Imperial Light Horse, holding the rank of Captain. He was promoted to the rank of Major after the battle of Elandslaagte, when Col. Scott CHISHOLME was killed.

Wednesday 21 February 1900

BIRTH at Grahamstown, Feb 19th, the wife of John W. JOHN of a daughter.

BIRTH at Mount Pleasant, Martindale, on Feb 18 1900, the wife of E. BUTCHER of a son.

KILLED in the Action at Sterkstroom, on February 7, E.W. DAMPIER, aged 20.

Quartermaster Sergeant BISHOP of the New South Wales Mounted Rifles died in De Aar Military Hospital on Thursday from sunstroke, and was buried with full military honours.

News has been received in Port Elizabeth of the death of Captain CRALLAN of Brabant’s Horse, killed in the bayonet charge of Brabant’s Horse near Dordrecht. Captain CRALLAN was well known in Johannesburg, and just before the outbreak of hostilities he proceeded to Alice with his wife and family. He set about to raise a corps for Brabant’s Horse, was appointed their captain and sent to the front. He was a very popular officer.

CASUALTIES
Capetown, Wednesday (Reuter):
The following is officially communicated – Casualties, Colonial troops:
Bird’s River, Friday:- Killed: Capt. CROLLAN, Lieut. CHANDLER, Saddler-Sergt. BURKE, Troopers PLUN and DAVEY, all of Brabant’s Horse, and Corp. DAVEY of Cape Mounted Rifles.

Thursday 22 February 1900

KILLED IN ACTION, on Jan 23rd 1900, at the Tugela, Frederick William JUBY, son of the late William JUBY of this city, aged 34 years.

His relatives in Grahamstown have just received the sad news of the death in action at the Tugela River of Trooper Fred JUBY of Thorneycroft’s Mounted Infantry. On January 23rd, Trooper JUBY was wounded in the thigh by a bullet, and his comrades were helping him on his horse, when a second bullet pierced his brain. The late Trooper JUBY will be remembered by many in Grahamstown. He was formerly with the [firm] of N. HOWSE & Co, and later at the [Bon Marche]. He was a brother to Mr. J.W. JUBY of this city.

Saturday 24 February 1900

MARRIED by Special Licence at Grahamstown on Feb 22 1900, Samuel J. BROWNE to Lily DANIELS.

Monday 26 February 1900

BIRTH at Hawkhurst House, Grahamstown, on the 25th February 1900, the wife of H.J. JENNINGS Esq. of a daughter.

LICENCE SUSPENDED
At the Queenstown Special Court on Thursday, Valentine WEBBER, proprietor of the Essex Arms, one of the largest hotels there, was charged with contravening the regulations of martial law by selling drink to soldiers in uniform. His licence was suspended for three months.

DEATH OF A NURSING SISTER
Maritzburg, Sunday (Reuter):
News reached Maritzburg this morning of the death of Mother SAINT ANTOINE, Superior of Estcourt Sanitorium, from enteric fever. Deceased lady, who was only thirty-two years old, worked hard, nursing the wounded and sick soldiers. Her efforts in this direction were highly appreciated by the Medical Staff.

Wednesday 28 February 1900

The death of Mr. Fred Slater COLLETT, who fell by the side of Capt. MONTMORENCY, when that gallant officer and many of his Scouts fell in a fight with an overpowering force of Boers at Stormberg last week, will be greatly regretted. Mr. COLLETT was a son of William COLLETT Esq. of Riet Vlei, Middelburg district, and came of a well-known and highly respected Settler family. He was an enterprising member of the Colonial Press, being Editor and Proprietor of the Albert Times; and when, owing to the war, that paper had to be intermitted, Mr. COLLETT became War Correspondent for several papers, and at the request of the Cape Premier he undertook a mission to President STEYN at Bloemfontein. More recently he joined MONTMORENCY’s Scouts, and has thus unfortunately perished in his early manhood, in the service of his country. We offer our sincere condolence to the bereaved parents and family, of which nearly all the sons are at present in active service.

A BRAVE COLONIST
A young Queenstownian, named Owen DRIVER, distinguished himself at the Spion Kop fight. He volunteered to carry a despatch asking for reinforcements, and he carried out the order on foot over six miles of mountainous country, and later in the day he joined his company again. The section to which he belonged lost 12 out of 25 men in that action.

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