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Eastern Province Herald (later The Herald)

Eastern Province Herald 1876 11 November

Friday 3 November 1876

DIED at Port Elizabeth, on the 29th October, Mary, the beloved wife of Mr. John WOOD, aged 51 years.

£25 REWARD – The above Reward will be paid for the apprehension and conviction of the Person or Persons who, on the night of the 22nd instant [recte October], waylaid and robbed Mr. G. R. BOYES. Port Elizabeth, October 26, 1876.

LATEST TELEGRAMS
Cape Town:
Arrival of R.M.S. “Walmer Castle.”
Tuesday: Walmer Castle, Captain WEBSTER, arrived on Monday night, at half-past ten, 24 days […] hours out. Passengers (for Algoa Bay): Mr. D. WILLIAMSON and family, Mr. and Mrs. SCHMIDT, Messrs. BREITMAYER, FRANK, [VELESIER], JOUBERT, FETLEY, MITCHELL, WILLIAMS, BREMMER, VAN DE BRUYN, MASON, [PELZER], [BONGIER], CRE[…], Mr. and Mrs. BERRY, Miss AYTON.
WILMOT, Postmaster at Port Elizabeth, leaves October 20. Has been furnished with complete plans of Post Office recently erected in England.
Dr. DAVIES, late of Port Elizabeth, is dead.
Kimberley:
Tuesday. Henry TUCKER, M.L.C., arrested to-day on charge of buying diamonds without licence. Much excitement. Particulars after examination.
Thursday. Henry TUCKER, member of the Legislative Council, sentenced to twelve months’ imprisonment for buying diamonds without a licence.

We (Penny Mail) regret to report the death of Mr. Frederick MANDY, from consumption, which took place on Sunday evening. The deceased was quite a young man, and his family are widely known and respected throughout the province. His death will be regretted by a large circle of friends.

A Captain Frederick Dyce WYNNE has been arrested on a charge of defrauding Captain BERRINGTON of a watch. WYNNE had the watch entrusted to him to get repaired, and he parted with it for a loan of £10. The watch was recovered, but the accused has been sent to the Knysna for trial.

Mr. George BOYES, a farmer near Uitenhage, was on Sunday night, the 22nd ult., attacked by a party of men whilst riding into Uitenhage and robbed of all he had about him, said to amount to some £500. The robbers have not yet been discovered.

On the night of Saturday, the 21st ult., a fire broke out in a stable belonging to Mr. J. R. BAKER, at the back of Queen-street. The flames spread to the adjoining premises of Mr. TOBIN, Mr. MACKAY, and Mr. PERRIN, and some £2,000 worth of damage was done. Mr. MACKAY sustained considerable loss, being only partly insured, and Mr. TOBIN and Mr. BAKER were not insured at all.

The Hon. J. C. CHASE, on account of advanced age and suffering from a recent accident, has resigned his seat in the Legislative Council.

The Cape papers give long accounts of the marriage of “Miss Martha KWATSHA,” a Fingoe who has been to England to complete her education, to the Rev. Pambani MZIMBA, the native minister at the Lovedale Institute.

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS
BIRTHS
FORSYTH, Mrs. J., at Port Elizabeth, on the 7th ult., of a son.
GENDERS, Mrs. J. R., at Port Elizabeth, on the 9th ult., of a daughter.
LEVICK, Mrs. F., at Port Elizabeth, on the 31st ult., of a daughter.
MOSENTHAL, Mrs., at Richmond, on the 26th September, of a daughter.
TANCRED, Mrs. A. F., at Port Elizabeth, on the 7th ult., of a son.
TAIT, Mrs. M. M., at Wheatfield, Mowbray, Cape Town, on the 3rd ult., of a daughter.
MARRIAGE
BEAN, Mr. D. L., at Port Elizabeth, on the 11th ult., to Miss S. E. VERMAAK.
DEATHS:
BEAN, E. G., at Preston Park, on the 5th ult, aged 3 years, 4 months, and 7 days.
CHABAUD, Mrs. D., at Port Elizabeth, on the 20th ult., aged 77 years and 6 months.
CORNELIUS, Mrs. S., at Carnarvon, on the 18th ult.
HOFFA, Mrs. F., at Richmond, on the 9th ult., aged 19 years and 9 days.
SCHLEMMER, Mrs. W. D., at Uitenhage, on the 4th ult., aged 76 years.
SEAMAN, Mrs. A. R., at Port Elizabeth, on the 4th ult., aged 63 years, 1 month, and 14 days.
WIARDA, H. F., at Rouxville, O.F.S., on the 17th ult., aged 4 months and 17 days.
WOOD, Mrs. M., at Port Elizabeth, on the 29th ult., aged 51 years.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT – Before A. C. WYLDE, Esq., CC and RM
Wednesday, November 1, 1876
James HARRISON and William FINLAY, seamen of the brig Queen, were brought up. charged with disobedience to lawful orders. The mate, in consequence of the illness of the captain, attended, and said both prisoners had refused to assist in unloading cargo. His Worship sentenced prisoners to one month’s hard labour and to forfeit two days’ pay. The Mate: If the ship sails before their term is up, can we get them out of prison? His Worship: Certainly. Prisoners said they would never go on board again. His Worship: You will be taken as passengers. The Mate: Oh, yes; we’ll take them like that. FINLAY: If I go on board again, I’ll have your life, you _.

PORT ELIZABETH CIRCUIT COURT – Before Mr. Justice DWYER, LL.D.
Thursday, November 2, 1876
The Court was opened at nine o’clock, Mr. VENNING acting as registrar, Mr. R. AYLIFF as interpreter, and Mr. STOCKENSTROM prosecuted on behalf of the Crown; the other counsel present being Messrs. BROWN, MAASDORP, and KOTZE.
Hut breaking – John ZULU was charged with breaking and entering a hut, and stealing various articles. Prisoner pleaded guilty, and said he was drunk at the time. His Lordship said this was not so bad a case, as the prisoner had been living in the hut with his brother-in-law. He should therefore only sentence him to 12 months’ imprisonment, with hard labour.
Absent Jurors – On the jury list being called, Messrs. EDWARDS, KELLY, McGREGOR, ROSS, OXENHAM, and WILLIAMS were found to be absent, and His Lordship fined them £5 each. Mr. OXENHAM immediately afterwards entered the court, and his fine was remitted; and in the case of Mr. KELLY a medical certificate was put in, which His Lordship declined to accept without the doctor attending. Subsequently Dr. ROSS attended, and said Mr. KELLY had been seriously ill for some time. His Lordship: Then I will remit the fine.
Shop breaking – Johannes WINDVOGEL pleaded guilty to breaking into the butcher’s shop of Mr. BAKER, and stealing several articles therefrom. Mr. STOCKENSTROM said the prisoner had several times previously been convicted of theft before the Magistrate. Sentenced to three years’ hard labour.
Wife-beating – James PILLANS, a carpenter, was charged with assaulting Jessie PILLANS, his wife, with intent to do her grievous bodily harm. Prisoner at first pleaded not guilty, but on His Lordship’s recommendation withdrew that plea, and pleaded guilty. His Lordship said under the circumstances he would let prisoner go, on his entering into his own recognizances to come up for judgment when called upon. His wife had given him great provocation, and said he had always hitherto been kind to her, and he was her only means of support, so that if he was sent to prison she would be punished as much as him.
Robbery with violence – Piet LUCAS, a cattle herd, was charged with assaulting Lena JANTJES, and robbing her with violence. The following jury was sworn to try this case: Messrs. J. BERRY, A. FISCHER, Alfred HILL, W. R. CHALMERS, Robert NORRIS, Daniel KEMSLEY, John SPENCE, Cradock PARKIN, and Wm. RIGG. The prosecutrix lives at Walmer, and last May was on her way home, when the prisoner attacked her, committed a criminal offence upon her, and afterwards robbed her of coffee and other articles which she had with her. His Lordship said he could not understand why this prisoner had not been indicted for the more serious offence to which the evidence clearly pointed. The jury found the prisoner guilty. His Lordship told prisoner robbery was crime he always punished with severity. In these thickly-populated towns people must be protected, and feel that they go along the roads with perfect security. The sentence of the Court was that he be imprisoned and kept to hard labour for three years, and to receive 35 lashes.
Culpable homicide – Thos. MACALLISTER, Henry JACOBS, Frederick JACOBS, and Nicholas ARENDS, were indicted for the culpable homicide of [MAMILY]. Mr. KOTZE, for Henry JACOBS, objected that his client had been placed in the dock, then in the witness box, and afterwards in the dock again. His Lordship: Yes, that man cannot be proceeded against. Mr. STOCKENSTROM: I imagine, my Lord, that the magistrate simply took his evidence in his capacity as coroner. Mr. WYLDE said that was so. His Lordship said the man’s evidence could not be used against himself. Mr. KOETZE [sic] defended Frederick JACOBS, Mr. MAASDORP appeared for MACALLISTER. The circumstances were fully reported at the time the case was heard before the magistrate. On a Saturday night, June 11, some Kafirs and the first prisoner were in a woman’s hut at the Location. They were making a good deal of noise, and the two JACOBS insisted on the hut being cleared. MACALLISTER left first, followed by the others, and soon afterwards there was a noise of a man being beaten, and the evidence was pretty clear that Nicholas was beating him, but the evidence against the others was not so clear, although three others were seen around him. The next morning the body of the deceased was found near the spot where the noise of blows had been heard. Sergeant CHERRY said the three coloured men surrendered themselves to him on Sunday evening, and ARENDS, on the Sergeant asking him whether they had anything to say, said, “Yes; we did all beat the man,” and Frederick JACOBS said the same. The other coloured man said nothing, and MACALLISTER was not present. Two of the men had blood on them, and they said it came from their lips where a Kafir had struck them. Dr. DUNSTERVILLE, who had made a post-mortem examination of the body, said the skull was smashed into innumerable pieces. His Lordship: There appears to be no evidence against McALLISTER. Mr. STOCKENSTROM said he should like to have the opinion of the jury upon that point. He then proceeded to sum up the evidence to the jury, Mr. MAASDORP having addressed the jury on behalf of Frederick JACOBS, and Mr. KOTZE on behalf of McALLISTER. His Lordship proceeded to sum up, and directed the jury that there was no evidence that McALLISTER took any part in beating the man. There was evidence that the three coloured men had confessed to the police sergeant that they had beaten the prisoner, but the fact that they had received blows seemed to point to the fact that it was a stand-up fight. The evidence showed the Kafirs to be the first aggressors, and it was for the jury to decide what amount of violence a man might use in self-defence. There were two Kafirs, and what became of the other? Might they not have had a fight. It was a dark night, and it was a question whether the witnesses could see clearly enough who was the man that struck the deceased. Unless they were able to do this they must acquit the whole of the prisoners. Dr. DUNSTERVILLE, recalled at the request of a prisoner, said a piece of wood like that produced – the lath of a bed – would cause the injuries he had described. There was a very slight external wound indeed, and the scalp was hardly cut. The bone was literally smashed. The jury then retired, and, after an absence of about ten minutes, returned into Court and acquitted the whole of the prisoners, who, as they left the dock, were a good deal hissed.

CIVIL ROLL
Wm. GORDON vs. Jno. PARKIN – Action to recover £200 for damages by defendant’s servant driving over plaintiff’s wife. Mr. STOCKENSTROM and Mr. BROWN (instructed by Mr. SCRIVENOR) for the plaintiff; Mr. KOETZE (instructed by Messrs. CHABAUD and DYASON) for the defendant. Mr. STOCKENSTROM stated that the defendant had a servant who had frequently been cautioned as to his habit of furiously driving in the streets, no matter how crowded they were. On the day in question the plaintiff’s wife was in Parliament-street, and was knocked down by the defendant’s cart – one of her toes cut off, and she was otherwise much injured. Mr. KOETZE argued that as their defence was contributory negligence he had the right to begin. His Lordship: Yes, if you will admit everything – that there was furious driving and that the sum claimed is a fair and reasonable one. After some argument, His Lordship told Mr. STOCKENSTROM to go on. Mrs. GORDON said on the 29th December last she was on her way from her house to the butcher’s in Parliament-street. She was walking on the left side of the street – the side opposite to the butcher’s. As she was in the street going to NIXON’s she saw PARKIN’s dairyman coming up from behind her. He was beating the horse very hard, and it was going very fast. She turned back to the side of the road, but before she could reach it she was knocked down by the horse. She was struck first on the side, but was not stunned. The road was very wide, and she was about two yards from the causeway. She was about three months in bed from the effects of the accident. The man was not keeping in the middle of the road, but going from side to side. By His Lordship: I was on the left-hand side of the road. Cross-examined: My husband was once, five years ago, charged before the Magistrate for ill-treating me. I was not attempting to cross the street when I was knocked down. William STEWART, a coloured boy, gave corroborative evidence. By the Judge: If the driver had pulled the right rein he wouldn’t have touched her. Mr. DIXON, who saw the accident, said the driver could have cleared the woman, had he been looking where he was driving. He pulled the left rein instead of the right. Dr. THOM said he had attended Mrs. GORDON, and found the great toe of the right foot bruised, the nail off, and the bone exposed; the right ancle was swollen and contused, the left hip bruised and discoloured, the left ancle discoloured and swollen, and the left temple swollen and discoloured. She suffered a great deal of pain, and it was a decided shock to the system. He attended her from the day of the accident until early in February. Mr. KOETZE argued that if he proved negligence he was entitled to a verdict. Joseph Henry NIXON, a blacksmith, who was only five yards off at the time the accident happened, said Mrs. GORDON was then two or three yards from the causeway. The boy was driving at a fair trot, and he did not remember his beating the horses. Mrs. GORDON, just before she was knocked over, attempted to cross the street. He and his brother called out before the woman was knocked over. If the woman had looked down the street she must have seen the cart. His Lordship: And the driver of the cart must have seen her too? Witness: Yes. Examination continued: If the woman had kept on the causeway, the cart would have cleared her. The driver was driving at the ordinary trot – as the cabs drive. The last witness’s brother gave similar evidence, and said if the woman had stood still when the driver pulled the left rein, she would not have been knocked down. Other evidence to the same effect having been called, Mr. KOETZE addressed the Court in support of his plea that there was contributory negligence. He held, too, that all that could be claimed was recompense for any actual loss the husband had sustained by the injury to his wife. Mr. BROWN contended that that is was competent for the husband to bring an action to recover damages for any injury she had sustained at the hands of a third person. A married woman had no locus standi in Court, and a husband must bring her action for her. His Lordship was quite of opinion there was negligence. No contributory negligence had been proved. From the way the declaration was framed the claim for damages for personal suffering could not be upheld, but she might afterwards herself sustain an action for personal injuries. Her husband had been deprived of her earnings, there was the doctor’s bill of £5 5s., and he would either give judgment for damages to be reduced, or the other side could move to increase them. Mr. BROWN said they would prefer to have the full amount liable to reduction. His Lordship: Well, I will give judgment for £25, with leave to increase it to another £25 if the higher Court should be of opinion the husband has on his declaration a right to recover for the personal suffering of his wife.

BIDEN, BARRY & Co. vs. M. STANTON – This was an action to recover £64 on a mortgage bond. Mr. Advocate BROWN for plaintiff. Defendant being in default, an order was granted for amount claimed.

COBB vs. A. TAYLOR & Co. (in liquidation) – Action to recover £[133] 4s., balance of open account. Mr. STOCKENSTROM, with him Mr. BROWN (instructed by Messrs. INNES & ELLIOTT), for the plaintiff; Mr. KOETZE (instructed by Messrs. CHABAUD & DYASON) for the defendant. Mr. KOETZE said he appeared on behalf of Mr. W. DUNN, the liquidator of the firm of A. TAYLOR & Co., and asked His Lordship to postpone the hearing of the case until the liquidation of the estate was completed. His Lordship: Is the firm bankrupt? Mr. KOETZE: No, my Lord; the two partners, Messrs. Alphonso and Isaac TAYLOR, appointed Mr. DUNN private liquidator. His Lordship: Was Mr. COBB one of the parties who appointed him liquidator? Mr. KOETZE: No, my Lord. His Lordship: Then I cannot recognise Mr. DUNN. Mr. KOETZE was proceeding to make some further remarks, when His Lordship said: Does Mr. DUNN wish to be made a party in this action, and be made personally answerable for the debt? Mr. KOETZE: No. His Lordship: Then he has no locus standi. Mr. KOETZE: Your Lordship sits here to administer equity as well as law, and _. His Lordship: There is no difference between law and equity in this colony, although it is so often talked about.. In England there are Courts of Equity, but here law implies equity and equity implies law. Mr. KOETZE said he would submit two points for His Lordship’s consideration: firstly, the trustee had not yet realised the estate, and, supposing there was a deficiency, it would not be fair to the other creditors if preference was given to Mr. COBB – in fact it would be a breach of trust; and secondly, the plaintiff, in his capacity as manager of the firm of COBB and Co., which had been bought by Messrs. A. TAYLOR and Co., had not accounted for certain moneys which he received, and which would perhaps now swamp the sum now claimed. His Lordship would also remember that pleas were allowed on equitable grounds. His Lordship said he had listened to Mr. KOETZE simply out of courtesy; but he must repeat that Mr. DUNN had no locus standi in the case. Upon whom was the summons served? Mr. STOCKENSTROM: Upon the liquidator and Mr. Alphonso TAYLOR, one of the late partners, who is here to confess the debt. His Lordship: That is sufficient; go on with your case. Mr. KOETZE: We are out of the case altogether, then. His Lordship: You were never in it, Mr. KOETZE (laughter). After some further conversation, His Lordship said: I really can’t hear you unless you agree to Mr. DUNN being made liable as the defendant. Mr. KOETZE, after a pause, agreed to do this. Mr. COBB proved that the amount claimed was due, and Mr. RICHES, a booking clerk to Messrs. MACKIE, DUNN & Co., deposed that he was instructed to make out a cheque for COBB for £139 4s. That order was countermanded. All the creditors had been paid. By Mr. KOETZE. I know that Mr. COBB owes TAYLOR & Co. £6,296. Mr. COBB, as manager of the travelling company, of which Mr. TAYLOR is really proprietor, has never rendered any accounts. By Mr. STOCKENSTROM. The money sued for now is money due to Mr. COBB personally, and not to COBB & Co. The books of COBB & Co. were kept in TAYLOR & Co.’s office. Did not know where these books were. The matter was settled by COBB buying all the plant of COBB & Co. from TAYLOR & Co. Promissory notes were passed, and I know one has been paid. Mr. KOETZE: Mr. COBB has never rendered us any account during the time he was our manager. When he does so we will pay him any balance that may be due to him. Mr. Carlton JONES, accountant, who was employed to keep the books of COBB and Co. whilst Mr. COBB was manager, said they were kept at Messrs. TAYLOR and Co.’s office, and TAYLOR and Co. had access to them. The books at present showed a balance in COBB’s favour of £400. Young Mr. TAYLOR had access to the books, and had never complained about them. By Mr. KOETZE. This £134 9s. [sic] is a private affair of Mr. COBB’s, and has nothing to do with my books. Mr. James G. MACFARLANE, a clerk to MACKIE, DUNN and Company, said Mr. DUNN sent him to COBB’s attorneys for the account against TAYLOR and Company, as they wanted to pay it. Mr. COBB, recalled, said he had never been called upon to render any account of his business whilst he was managing for COBB and Co. The present claim was simply for carriages imported by him from America, and sold to the firm of A. TAYLOR and Co. By Mr. KOETZE. In December last I became the purchaser of the business of COBB and Co. It never belonged to TAYLOR and Company. I was managing the business for eleven months for Mr. A. TAYLOR. I never told Mr. Isaac TAYLOR and Mr. DUNN I would render an account of any business whilst I was manager for COBB and Co. I never rendered an account as there was no necessity for it, the books all being accessible to Mr. A. TAYLOR, the owner of the property. Mr. William DUNN, the liquidator of TAYLOR and Company, said: Isaac TAYLOR was senior partner, and had the whole of the money in the firm. Mr. I. TAYLOR came out from Boston on account of the mismanagement of the concern. He (witness) was called in because both the TAYLORs were to go to Boston immediately. He was to liquidate the business, and transmit the proceeds to Boston. In November, 1874, A. TAYLOR and Co. bought the business of COBB and Co., and whilst it belonged to them Freeman COBB was manager. Of his management he has never rendered an account, and Isaac TAYLOR thought it was a sham sale between COBB and Alphonso TAYLOR. Mr. KIRKWOOD, who was at Rome, knew the whole of the circumstances. His Lordship said what was really wanted was to set aside a presumed sham sale and this he had no authority to do. Mr. DUNN said Mr. A. TAYLOR was not now, as was first intended, going to America. His Lordship said it seemed as if they wanted to pay the whole of the money away and then COBB would have to whistle for his money. By Mr. STOCKENSTROM. I have received £1,000 from Mr. COBB on one of these bills. His Lordship gave judgment for the plaintiff with costs.

Michael STANTON vs. BIDEN, BARRY & Co.
Action in trover for the recovery of two vats and a cow. Mr. STOCKENSTROM for plaintiff, Mr. BROWN for defendant. Thos. O’BRIEN, law agent, and agent for the plaintiff, deposed he knew Martin STANTON, the the [sic] brother of the plaintiff. Remembered his getting into difficulties and DEARE & DIETZ taking out a writ. A meeting of creditors was held at Mr. Attorney HARRIES’ office. The creditors agreed to accept a composition of 5s. in the £1, which was paid by Michael on all Martin’s property being ceded to him. That agreement was signed by Wm. BIDEN. Mr. BROWN: That was not signed by the present defendants, who were not then creditors of the insolvent. Mr. O’BRIEN: I paid them the composition myself, and got BIDEN, BARRY & Co.’s endorsement. Michael STANTON, the present plaintiff, was to pay the composition. Everything was handed over to Michael STANTON, and witness kept the key for him. The next day I paid the composition to, amongst others, Mr. BIDEN. Subsequently Messrs. BIDEN, BARRY & Co. took possession of the vats and cow. Mr. BROWN read a letter from Mr. Martin STANTON, making over to Messrs. BIDEN, BARRY & Co. his cattle. Mr. WORMALD proved attaching Martin STANTON’s moveables, and afterwards received instructions to remove the attachment, and hand over all the goods seized to Michael STANTON. The two vats and cow and calf were amongst them. The plaintiff deposed that the premises where his brother carried on business belonged to him. He recollected the vats and the cow and calf being handed over to him by the Sheriff. He sent out the cow and calf to Mr. BAILEY’s farm at Chelsea. He told his brother to send them. BAILEY now claims the cow and calf, and Mr. BIDEN took away the vats. The vats were worth about £30, and the cow and calf £28. He had also lost the value of the milk. Mr. BROWN: We claim £5 for damages. Mr. S. WHITE proved selling the cow to Mr. Martin STANTON for £29 10s. For the defence Mr. BROWN called Mr. Redmond BARRY, who proved getting an order from Martin STANTON for a cow and calf. The cow, then in bad condition, was offered on the market, and he sold it to BAILEY for £10. His Lordship gave a verdict for the plaintiff for the vats and £[25] for the cow, and £5 damages. He thought it a most unheard-of defence.

UITENHAGE CIRCUIT COURT
Tuesday, 31st October, 1876
Assault with Intent – Cobus NICOLAI was charged with having on the 10th August, 1876, at Uitenhage, assaulted Joseph TITUS with a stone or some blunt instrument on the face, head, chest, and other parts of the body. Mr. KOETZEE stated that he could not proceed with the case as there was no witness to prove the man’s identity. Discharged.
Culpable Homicide – Joseph DOWDESWELL, a platelayer, residing at the Coega, was charged with having on the 17th June, 1876, unlawfully killed Jacobus ABRAHAMS at that place. The Public Prosecutor withdrew the case, as the most important witness, the doctor, was in England. His Lordship told the prisoner that he had had a very narrow escape, and advised him not to use a knife again, but if he wanted to fight, to fight like a man and use his fist and not a knife.
Theft – Joseph CROSS, a navvy, charged with having on the 4th July, 1876, stolen £18 10s., the property of Henry LIPPENS, a navvy, pleaded not guilty. Mr. MAASDORP appeared for prisoner. The jury returned a verdict of guilty, and his Lordship sentenced him to pay a fine of £30, and undergo one year’s imprisonment. His Lordship added, that had there been a Government Savings Bank established near the camp, no doubt the money would not have been stolen. […]
Assault – [Booy GOURA] charged with having on the 12th July, 1876, ass[a]ulted Andries DU PREEZ, aged 6 years, residing at Commando Kraal, by seizing and twisting his leg and causing a fracture of the right thigh, was found not guilty.
Burglary – Jan [OSONDWARI] alias John LAZARUS a labourer, residing in Uitenhage, charged with having, on the 14th August, 1876, broken [into] a house situate at Cuyler Manor, and belonging to the Colonial Government, and stealing various articles of dress, &c., pleaded guilty to all three counts, and was sentenced to two years’ hard labour.
Assault and Robbery – John [CULEMBO] and John CA[…], charged with having, on the 13th July, 1876, assaulted John M[…], and taken from his person money to the amount of £6 10s., one bar[…], one knife, and one pipe, were found guilty of assault only. Sentence – six months’ hard labour.
Assault and Robbery – Sam [MOFUBUHA], William [JAFTE], and Robert C[…], labourers, were charged with having, on the 20th August, 1876, assaulted [LONGMAN], and taken from him his purse, containing money to the amount of £[15]. Mr. MAASDORP appeared for Sam [MOFUBUHA]. Found guilty of assault only – Sentenced to three months’ hard labour.
Burglary – Sam [TYSLIE], labourer, charged with having, on the 19th May, 1876, at Thornkloof, district Alexandria, broken into the house of J. W. COSGROVE, a carrier, and stolen one gun, eleven rolls of tobacco, ten coins, four sheets, four pillow cases, and one whip. – Pleaded not guilty. – Also on the 11the July, 1876, from Tafinie [GOEN] the sum of £16 10s. Prisoner pleaded guilty to taking the money of Tafinie [GOEN], and said he had spent it. Verdict – Guilty of housebreaking and theft of gun. Sentence – Three years’ hard labour.
Attempted Rape – Piet RADEMEYER was charged with having, on the 22nde May, 1876, attempted the above crime on the daughter of George EGGBURY, at Solitude, in this district. The prisoner was employed on the farm of complainant’s father, and took advantage of his master’s absence to try and effect his purpose. Verdict – Guilty. Sentenced to 50 lashes, and to imprisonment, with hard labour, for five years.

LOCAL AND GENERAL

INSOLVENCY COURT – The first meeting in the insolvent estate of Paul PERRIN, for proof of debts, was held before the Resident Magistrate on Wednesday last, but no creditors appeared. Mr. J. PERKINS is the provisional trustee to the estate. – A meeting in the intestate estate of William ASHKETTLE (deceased) for appointment of executor dative, was held at the same time and place. Mr. SCRIVENOR said he appeared for the heirs, and moved that Thomas ASHKETTLE, deceased’s eldest son, be appointed executor dative.

DIAMOND FIELDS – Several cases of illicit buying have been before the Resident Magistrate’s Court at Kimberley, and appears [sic] to have excited much attention. William DU TOIT, a coloured man, for buying two diamonds from a boy named AFRICAN, was sentenced to three years’ imprisonment. William CLIFFORD and Nicholas STRAGE, for similar offences, were respectively sentenced to undergo 12 months’ and 18 months’ hard labour. Mr. WALSHE, the gun maker, has been committed for trial, but bail was accepted.

APPOINTMENTS– John Edward Charles HODGES, Esquire, to be one of the Commissioners for examining the protocols and registers of notaries public practising in the District of Caledon, from the date of assuming his duties at that station, vice J. G. FAURE, Esquire, promoted. – Arthur Sydney HOOLE, Esquire, to be one of the Commissioners for examining the protocols and registers of notaries public practising in the district of Victoria East, from the date of assuming his duties at that station, vice J. E. C. HODGES, Esquire, transferred.

The R.M.S. Elizabeth Martin, Capt. R. DUNCAN, sailed from this port yesterday afternoon for London, via Mossel and Table Bays, with […] the following passengers: For Mossel Bay – Mr. LOUGH; For Cape Town – Mr. W. G. THOMPSON, Mr. A. HOFFMAN, Mr. DREGE, Mr. F. BARBER, Two Indians, Two deck passengers; For London – Mr. W. CARR, Mrs. CARR and 3 children, Mr. G. CHAPMAN, Mrs. CHAPMAN, Mr. PASSMORE, Mr. A. W. HALE.

MEETINGS IN INSOLVENT ESTATES
November 6 – At Cradock, in re Elijah SUMMERLEE, third. P. A. SINGLETON, trustee. Gazette, No. 5,618.
November 6 – At Wodehouse (query Dordrecht), in re Isaac Stephanus JOUBERT, H.’s son, of Streyfontein, division of Wodehouse, farmer, second. No. 5,622.
November 6 – At Queen’s Town, in re Bennett HARVEY, lately of Klipplaat, division of Queen’s Town, wool-washer, now of Uitenhage, second. No. 5,622.
November […] – At Mossel Bay in re William Turner WILKINSON, of Kieviets Kraal, division of Mossel Bay, farmer, first. No. 5,625.
November [8] – At Port Elizabeth, in re Alexander George ROBERTSON, late of Mossel Bay, special. Geo. GORDON, trustee. No. 5,620.
November 8 – At Port Elizabeth, in re Paul PERRIN, of Port Elizabeth, merchant, second. No. 5,622.
November 8 – At Graham’s Town, in re Joseph Randall PINNOCK, of Fort Brown, division of Albany, shopkeeper, second. No. 5,622.
November 8 – At Cape Town, in re Hendrik Albertus Cornelis [KIESER], of Kenhardt, division of Victoria West, second. No. 5,622.
November 8 (not 8th October as printed) – At Aliwal North, in re Josiah BOWING, of Aliwal North, clerk, second. No. 5,622.
November 8 – At Graham’s Town, in re Isaac Johannes FERREIRA, of Sharon, division of Albany, but now of Cradock, second. No. 5,622.
November 8 – At Burghersdorp, in re Henry RIDLEY, of Burghersdorp, watchmaker, first. No. 5,624.
November 8 – At Burghersdorp, in re Franz Heinrich HOLM and Alexander Fraser MACKINTOSH, carrying on business together under the style or firm of Franz HOLM & Company, of Nooitgedacht, division of Albert, shopkeepers and pontoon keepers, first. No. 5,624.
November 8 – At Port Elizabeth, in re Jacob [GUITES], of Port Elizabeth, general dealer, first and final. No. 5,624.
November 10 – At East London, in re Gerhardus Cornelis SNYMAN, of Maclean, in the division of East London, carrier, first. No. 5,624.
November 10 – At Somerset East, in re Willem Abraham DE KLERK, Jan’s son, of [Karkots] Kraal, division of Somerset East, first. No. 5,624.
November 11 – At Queen’s Town, in re James SMITH of the division of Queen’s Town, farmer, third. William J. QUIN, trustee. No. 5,622.
November 12 – At Cradock, in re James [SCHOOTING], of Cradock, carpenter, first. No. [5,614].
November 13 – At Mossel Bay, in re William Turner WILKINSON, of Kieviets Kraal, division of Mossel Bay, farmer, second. No. 5,615.
November [13] – At Middelburg, in re George ISAAC, of Middelburg, third. W. A. WENTZEL, jun., trustee. No. 5,623.
November 14 – At Burghersdorp, in re Henry RIDLEY, of Burghersdorp, watchmaker, second. No. 5,624.
November 15 – At Burghersdorp, in re Franz Heinrich HOLM and Alexander Fraser MACKINTOSH, carrying on business together under the style or firm of Franz HOLM & Company, of Nooitgedacht, division of Albert, shopkeepers and pontoon keepers, second. No. 5,624.
November 17 – At East London, in re Gerhardus SNYMAN, of Maclean, in the division of East London, carrier, second. No. 5,624.
November 17 – At Somerset East, in re Willem Abraham DE KLERK, Jan’s son, of Kar[…] Kraal, division of Somerset East, second. No. 5,624.
November 18 – At Richmond, in re Charl William HILDENBURY, of Rhenosterfontein, division of Hope Town, third. I. P. J. VAN DER POEL, trustee. No. 5,618.
November 20 – At Cradock, in re James [SCHOOTING], of Cradock, carpenter, second. No. 5,625.
November 20 – At Cradock, in re George Frederick A[…], of Cradock, […] [George] ARMSTRONG, trustee. No. […]
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Stephanus MEINTJES, third. A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. […]
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Jasper [Francois] [Steyn] […], third. A. HARTZENBERG, jun., and C. A. T. DE GRAAFF, trustees. No. […]

INTESTATE ESTATES
November 7 – At Graaff-Reinet, next of kin and creditors of Gerhardus Hendrik JANSEN VAN RENSBURG, of the Graaff-Reinet District, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,615.
November 7 – At King William’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Hannah BROWNLEE, of the King William’s Town District, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,615. [Died Balfour, 20 December 1875; DN: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QG54-7RGL ]
November [12] – At Humansdorp, next of kin and creditors of Christine […] DU PLESSIES (born FERREIRA), of the Humansdorp district, deceased, and surviving husband, Theodorus Daniel DU PLESSIES, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,615.
November [13] – At Oudtshoorn, next of kin and creditors of Hendrik Jacobus GREEFF, of the Oudtshoorn district, and surviving spouse, Cornelia Sophia Johanna GREEFF (born VAN BILJON) to appoint executors dative, &c.
November 14 – At Graaff-Reinet, next of kin and creditors of Maria Isabella [TUA], a widow of the Graaff-Reinet district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,618.
November 15 – At Port Elizabeth, next of kin and creditors of Mary TRUMAN (born PULLENGER), a widow of the Port Elizabeth district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. […]
November [16] – At Albert (query Burghersdorp), next of kin and creditors of Robert SMITH and surviving spouse Eliza SMITH, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,618.
November 17 – At Eland’s Post, next of kin and creditors of Henry COCHRANE, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,619.
November 17 – At Queen’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Arnold SHEPPERSON, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,619.
November 17 – At Middelburg, next of kin and creditors of Barend Daniel PRETORIUS, of the Middelburg district, and surviving spouse Elizabeth Magdalena PRETORIUS, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,619.
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, next of kin and creditors of Fredrika Elizabeth MEINTJES (born [BLOES]), of the Graaff-Reinet district, and surviving husband Willem Hendrik Stephanus MEINTJES, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,620.
November 22 – At Albert (Qu[e]ry Burghersdorp), next of kin and creditors of Johanna Hendrina COETSEE (born DU [PLAATS]), widow of Jacobus COETSEE, of the Albert district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,[…].
November 23 – At Hanover, next of kin and creditors of Friederich Wilhelm TAIT, of the Hanover district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,616.
November 23 – At Peddie, the paternal and maternal relations of the minors Friedricke BERLIN, Albertina BERLIN, and Carl Frans BERLIN, minor children of the late Carel Gottlieb Otto BERLIN, and subsequently deceased spouse, Henrietta Wilhelmina Christina BERLIN (born JUDENSCHWAGER), to appoint executors dative, &c., &c. No. […]
November [28] – At Beaufort West, next of kin and creditors of Wilhelmina Maria LE GRANGE (born JANSE VAN RENSBURG), of the Beaufort West district, and surviving husband Pieter Andries LE GRANGE, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
November 29 – At Port Elizabeth, next of kin and creditors of William PYE, of the Port Elizabeth district, and subsequently deceased spouse Ann PYE (born BANKS), to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
November 29 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Edward HULLEY and his predeceased spouse Mary HULLEY (born GRADWELL), to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
November 29 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Thomas FRANCIS, the Elder, of the Albany district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,622.
November 30 – At Cradock, next of kin and creditors of Sarah Johanna Elizabeth FOURIE (born [NANDERS]), of the Cradock district, and surviving husband Johannes Hendrick FOURIE, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
December 1 – At Somerset East, next of kin and creditors of Anna Margaretha Caroline ERASMUS (born DE VILLIERS), widow of Lourens Jacobus ERASMUS, of the Somerset East district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,623.
December [5] – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Mary Ann GODDARD (born HELY), of the Albany district, and surviving husband William GODDARD, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,623. [DN: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QGTG-HH8F ; died 21 July 1876]
December 6 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of William McCARTER, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,624.
December [8] – At Queen’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Cathrine [Claire] Maria KIDSON (born ODENDAAL), of the Queen’s Town district, and surviving husband Joseph KIDSON, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,624.
December [8] – At East London, next of kin and creditors of Carl Herman GRAEFF, of the Oud[t]shoorn district, and surviving spouse, Ann GRAEFF (born BROWN), since remarried to August PABST, to appoint executors dative, &c. [Marriage of Ann GRAEFF and August PABST: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:6ZHB-6G2L ]

Tuesday 7 November 1876

BIRTH on the 31st October, Mrs. Fred L[EVINE] of a daughter.

DIED at his residence, 189 Adelaide Road, South Hampstead, England, on 24th September, Richard Lewis DAVIES, for many years District Surgeon of Port Elizabeth.

LATEST TELEGRAMS
Graham’s Town:
Mr. PRINGLE, member of Defence Commission, died very suddenly on Wednesday last.
[DN: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QP4Y-J1GQ]
Accident to Mr. SLESSOR – We (Journal) extremely regret to hear that a sad accident occurred yesterday to Mr. SLESSOR, Resident Engineer. While returning from Graham’s Town to Alicedale, on horseback, he was by some means thrown, with the result of breaking his collar-bone. Dr. ATHERSTONE left town immediately to render assistance.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT – Before A. C. WYLDE, Esq., CC and RM
Friday, November 3, 1876
[…] [OCT]OBER, a boy in Mr. MADGE’s employ, was charged with disobedience. The boy’s conduct […]ed and the contract was cancelled.
Saturday, November 4, 1876
[Two cases, mostly illegible, of assault]
Monday, November 6, 1876
[…] was charged with creating a disturbance […] of Mr. STEINMANN’s hotel on […]. […], a barman to Mr. STEINMANN, said the [prisoner] […] to the place drunk, and he refused […]. He then became […] to fight every one. Sent for a […]
[Several other cases, mostly illegible]

LOCAL AND GENERAL

James KEY, Esq., M.A., M.B., C.R., has been authorised to practise as a physician and surgeon in this Colony.

The insolvency of Charles SONNENBERG of Kimberley, merchant, is announced. Assets, £[…], liabilities £52,[…], deficiency £29,219.

[Accused of] Culpable Insolvency – Mr. William Henry GRAVETT has been remanded by the Graham’s Town magistrate on a charge of culpable insolvency.

APPOINTMENTS – Mr. Thomas STUBBS, [jr.], to be Field-cornet for the Ward [Mapassa] No. 1, in the division of Queen’s Town, in the room of Mr. Wm. STUBBS, resigned; Mr. H. J. BARNARD to be Field-cornet of the Ward [Gonbama], in the Division of Knysna, in the room of Mr. F. A. DUTHIE, resigned.

THE GREAT DIAMOND ROBBERY – Latest advices from Rio inform us that Henry SMITH, M. [C.] EDWARDS, and M. MEYER, gentlemen rejoicing in various aliases, who were about this time last year apprehended here, on a charge of stealing diamonds, have been tried at Rio, and sentenced each to fourteen years’ banishment and imprisonment.

FATAL ACCIDENT – On Wednesday afternoon, at about three o’clock, a St. Helena man, named Dick EDWARDS, met his death in the Cape Town Docks from a case of goods falling upon him, on board the R.M.S. Walmer Castle. Deceased was employed in discharging the cargo. He died as he was being removed to the Hospital.

THE LATE MR. TEMLETT – The Alice Times contains a long obituary notice of the late Mr. J. B. TEMLETT, a gentleman long identified with every philanthropic work in that town and district. His funeral took place at 4 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, with every demonstration of grief and respect. The [procession], which was headed by the Alice, and the chief officials of the Fort Beaufort, Good Templars, was one of the largest ever seen in the district. [James Brilliant TEMLETT, died 27 October 1876; DN: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QP4Y-J12K]

FATAL ACCIDENT – On Tuesday last an accident of a very serious nature took place at Gilfillan Bridge Works, Cradock, whereby one of the workmen, a white man named James [H.] SMITH, lost his life, and five other workmen, four of them coloured men, were more or less injured. It appears that the six men were engaged in fastening on the iron flooring of the bridge, and were standing upon a stage suspended beneath, when the structure gave way, precipitating them some 25 feet, partly into the water and partly upon a hard bank just under the stage. There was considerable delay in getting out the man, who subsequently died, as he fell into the water, and it was not known for some minutes that he was there.

NATIVE CARELESSNESS – On Monday week a sad accident occurred at Kimberley to a little fellow of two and a half years old, son of Mr. George BLAKEMORE. He had just been across the road in front of his father’s house, to take a cake to a baby friend of his, and was sedately making his way back again, when he was run over by one of Mr. GREEN’s Scotch carts, which was being driven at a rapid pace towards the owner’s compound. The poor child was trampled by the mules, and run over by the wheel of the cart, and his collar-bone broken, and shoulder put out of joint, and otherwise so much injured that blood was oozing from his nose and ears all the following night. The boy who drove the cart is said to have been frequently cautioned about his careless driving.

NEW WESLEYAN MINISTERS – Of the five young ministers who embarked from England by the Windsor Castle, two arrived here by the Anglian last Monday, and three by the Walmer Castle on Sunday morning. The following is a list of their names and appointments: Rev. T. [H.] W[…]KIN, Graham’s Town District; Missionary Rev. Edward S. SELLER, Dordrecht; Rev. Charles PELLMAN, Panmure; Rev. Thos. A. CHANDLER, Moshanery, Bechuana Country; Rev. Thos. W. POCOCK, Diamond Fields. Amongst the other passengers by the Windsor Castle were the Rev. T. MASON, who is on his way to Pietermaritzburg as Chairman of the Natal District, and the Revs. W. I. HACKER and W. CLIFF, appointed to the Cape District. These are to be followed by Revs. W. HUNTER and Owen WATKINS, who are expected by the Dunrobin Castle next week, the former for Heald Town and the latter for Natal.
The R.M.S. Nyanza, Captain H. J. O. S. WARLEIGH, sailed from this port on Friday last for Southampton, via Table Bay, with the following passengers: For Cape Town – Mr. [HEDGES], Mrs. [HEDGES], Miss G[RE]GO[R]Y, Miss […], Mr. [KENYON], [Alexander] [KOETZE], Mr. J. [MASON], Mr. […] [MERCHANT], Mr[s.] […], Miss [MERCHANT], Mr. H. M[…]R, Mr. H. […], Mr. A. H. [S…]PORT, Mrs. McCARTHY, Mr. J. DOUGLAS, Mr. A. [MAIR], Mr. A. […], Mr. [NORTHAM], Mr. P[…], Mr. J. P. JOHNSON; [For Southampton] – Mr. [J. FRASER], Mr. […], Mr. […], Mr. […] MA[…].

[There are details, mostly illegible, of insolvencies, including W[il]lem Hendrik […] of Graaff-Reinet, carrier; Johannes Fran[cois] […]HERS, of Richmond, farmer; and Charles SONNENBERG of Kimberley, merchant]

AN AFFECTIONATE NEPHEW – The Government Gazette of Tuesday last contains an apology from P. O. STEYN ([…]), the “affectionate nephew” of H. P. STEYN, P.’s son, Esq., of Swellendam, for having “violently assaulted” his uncle, and “for having used abusive language” to him. The “affectionate nephew” says: “I consider myself a coward for doing so, as I was well aware at the time I struck you that you were still suffering from the effects of a broken leg and that you were in consequence unable to defend yourself. I trust, therefore, that you will overlook, and banish from your memory, what has occurred, and forgive me. To show the extreme regret I feel for what has past, I give you full liberty to have this apology inserted in whatever newspaper or papers you may please. I remain, my Dear Uncle, Your Affectionate Nephew, P. O. STEYN ([…]).

HOSPITAL BOARD – The ordinary meeting of the Hospital Board was held yesterday at […] p.m. Present – H. W. PEARSON, Esq. (in the chair), Revs. N. BROOK, R. JOHNSTON, H. KAYSER, J. C. MACINTOSH, and H. RAPPAPORT, and Messrs. A. […]G, E. PREISS, G. APPLEBY, and T. WORMALD. […]

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE
Arrived in Algoa Bay
Nov. [4] – Florence, R.M.S. (of Leith), Capt. [FULTON] […] from Port Natal 1st Nov. East London 2nd Nov., for this port. Passengers – For this port – Messrs. J. H. [MUNDAY], […], MACKAY, and [11] Kafirs; For Cape Town – Dr. […]HNE[…] and Mr. […]RLE; For London – Mr. A. H. NEWMAN.
Nov. [4] – , Capt. {H. P.] ANDR[…], from Mauritius […] for this port. Passengers – Messrs. W. […]VIE, [I.] MORGAN and W. HUGHES.
Nov. [6] – Walmer Castle R.M.S. (of London), Capt. M. P. WEBSTER, from Table Bay 2nd Nov. for this port. Passengers – For this port – Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAMSON and two sons, Mr. and Mrs. [BACHE], Mr. JA[…]ON and son, Mr. and Miss MANNING, Mr. and Mrs. FORRESTER, Mrs. W[EARE], Mrs. […]ORUS, Mrs. [STONE] [with] infant, […], Mr. and Mrs. BARRY, Mr. and Mrs. […]TT, Mrs. […], Miss Minnie AYTON, Messrs. P. W. WILLIAMS, BREITMEYER, […] PALLISTER, [I.] JOUBERT, J. PETLEY, [T.] LYNCH, H. SWINGER, I. FRANK, PAL[…]ER, C. F. MASON, W. H. [BREMNER], {C. L.] VAN DE HE[...] RE[...]IER, C. [CRENON], HUMPHREY, CHALKER, POCOCK, J. A. VL[...]ER, R. SOUTHEY, BE[…]INHOUT, A. […] [MENCKEL], W. N. ST[…]ER, M. VAN DE MEULINS, SNYMAN, [I.] A. […], [I.] PERKINS, [HITCHEN], STANLEY, COLMAN, W[...], [HUDD], [...]OMP[...], [HATCHE], R. POHL, BODENSTEIN, and five deck passengers; For East London – Rev. J. & Mrs., Masters and Misses […]N and servant, Mrs. MACLEAN and servant, Sergeant WHENMAN […], Messrs. COLLICOTT, P[…]MAN, and R. […] P. DAVIES; For Natal – Rev. Mr. and Mrs. MASON, infant and servant, Misses MASON, CLARKE, and [I.] M[…], Masters MASON, Messrs. A. GRAY, [C.] A. MULLER, W. F. [HARLEY], [F.] P[…], […] S[…]L, and [James] C. M[…], A. and W. C[…], T. [CROHILL], J. [BAILEY], W. [LANGMARSTEN], P. […]MAN, and HAWORTH.

MEETINGS IN INSOLVENT ESTATES
November [8] – At Port Elizabeth, in re Alexander George ROBERTSON, late of Mossel Bay, special. Geo. GORDON, trustee. No. 5,620.
November 8 – At Port Elizabeth, in re Paul PERRIN, of Port Elizabeth, merchant, second. No. 5,622.
November 8 – At Graham’s Town, in re Joseph Randall PINNOCK, of Fort Brown, division of Albany, shopkeeper, second. No. 5,622.
November 8 – At Cape Town, in re Hendrik Albertus Cornelis [KIESER], of Kenhardt, division of Victoria West, second. No. 5,622.
November 8 (not 8th October as printed) – At Aliwal North, in re Josiah BOWING, of Aliwal North, clerk, second. No. 5,622.
November 8 – At Graham’s Town, in re Isaac Johannes FERREIRA, of Sharon, division of Albany, but now of Cradock, second. No. 5,622.
November 8 – At Burghersdorp, in re Henry RIDLEY, of Burghersdorp, watchmaker, first. No. 5,624.
November 8 – At Burghersdorp, in re Franz Heinrich HOLM and Alexander Fraser MACKINTOSH, carrying on business together under the style or firm of Franz HOLM & Company, of Nooitgedacht, division of Albert, shopkeepers and pontoon keepers, first. No. 5,624.
November 8 – At Port Elizabeth, in re Jacob [GUITES], of Port Elizabeth, general dealer, first and final. No. 5,624.
November 10 – At East London, in re Gerhardus Cornelis SNYMAN, of Maclean, in the division of East London, carrier, first. No. 5,624.
November 10 – At Somerset East, in re Willem Abraham DE KLERK, Jan’s son, of [Karkots] Kraal, division of Somerset East, first. No. 5,624.
November 11 – At Queen’s Town, in re James SMITH of the division of Queen’s Town, farmer, third. William J. QUIN, trustee. No. 5,622.
November 11 – At Fort Beaufort (query [...]), in re James SMITH of the division of Queen’s Town, farmer, third. William J. QUIN, trustee. No. 5,622.
November 12 – At Cradock, in re James [SCHOOTING], of Cradock, carpenter, first. No. [5,614].
November 13 – At Mossel Bay, in re William Turner WILKINSON, of Kieviets Kraal, division of Mossel Bay, farmer, second. No. 5,615.
November 13 – At Stockenstrom (query Seymour), in re Johannes Frederick BOTHA of the district of Stockenstrom, farmer and carrier, first. No. […]
November [13] – At Middelburg, in re George ISAAC, of Middelburg, third. W. A. WENTZEL, jun., trustee. No. 5,623.
November 14 – At Burghersdorp, in re Henry RIDLEY, of Burghersdorp, watchmaker, second. No. 5,624.
November 15 – At Burghersdorp, in re Franz Heinrich HOLM and Alexander Fraser MACKINTOSH, carrying on business together under the style or firm of Franz HOLM & Company, of Nooitgedacht, division of Albert, shopkeepers and pontoon keepers, second. No. 5,624.
November 17 – At East London, in re Gerhardus SNYMAN, of Maclean, in the division of East London, carrier, second. No. 5,624.
November 17 – At East London, in re Mathys Jacobus Human SNYMAN of Kwelegha, division of East London, carrier, first. No. […] [M. J. H. SNYMAN, marriage: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:ZNL5-9LMM]
November 17 – At Somerset East, in re Willem Abraham DE KLERK, Jan’s son, of Kar[kots] Kraal, division of Somerset East, second. No. 5,624.
November 18 – At Richmond, in re Charl William HILDENBURY, of Rhenosterfontein, division of Hope Town, third. I. P. J. VAN DER POEL, trustee. No. 5,618.
November 20 – At Cradock, in re James [SCHOOTING], of Cradock, carpenter, second. No. 5,625.
November 20 – At Cradock, in re George Frederick AUSTEN, of Cradock, special. George ARMSTRONG, trustee. No. 5,621.
November 20 – At Stockenstrom (query Seymour), in re Johannes Frederick BOTHA, of the division of Stockenstrom, farmer and carrier, second. No. 5,621.
November 20 – At Middelburg, in re Jan Marthinus K..., late of Middelburg, painter, first and final. No. […]
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Stephanus MEINTJES, third. A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. […]
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Jasper Francois Alwyn BOLLEURS, third. A. HARTZENBERG, jun., and C. A. T. DE GRAAFF, trustees. No. […]
November 23 – At Graham’s Town, in re Frederick L[…], special. […] H. ATTWELL, trustee. No. 5,6[…].
November 24 – At East London, in re Mathys Jacobus Human SNYMAN, of Kwelegha, division of East London, carrier, second. No. 5,6[…].
November 25 – At Fort Beaufort, in re Joseph Arthur TROLLIP, of […] Farm, near A[…], Victoria East, farmer and carrier, third. William J. QUIN and W. J. MUGGLETON, trustees. No. […]
November [28] – At Wodehouse (query Dordrecht), in re S[…] G[…]laar OLIVIER, of the district of Wodehouse, third. [Spencer] PLETSCHER, trustee. No. […]
December 4 – At Cradock, in re Albert HADLOW, of Cradock, third. Robert [HARE], trustee. No. […]
December 4 – At Cradock, in re William Cathcart [DONNELL], of Cradock, third. Robert [HARE], trustee. No. 5,620. [William Cathcart DONNELL, burial, Cradock, 21 Dec 1876: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:6FYQ-JZ7X]
December 5 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re James Charles [HUFFORD], third. A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. 5,[…].

INTESTATE ESTATES
November 10 – At Humansdorp, next of kin and creditors of Christine Elizabeth DU PLESSIES (born FERREIRA), of the Humansdorp district, deceased, and surviving husband, Theodorus Daniel DU PLESSIES, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,615.
November [13] – At Oudtshoorn, next of kin and creditors of Hendrik Jacobus GREEFF, of the Oudtshoorn district, and surviving spouse, Cornelia Sophia Johanna GREEFF (born VAN BILJON) to appoint executors dative, &c.
November 14 – At Graaff-Reinet, next of kin and creditors of Maria Isabella TUA, a widow of the Graaff-Reinet district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,618.
November 15 – At Port Elizabeth, next of kin and creditors of Mary TRUMAN (born PULLENGER), a widow of the Port Elizabeth district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,618.
November [16] – At Albert (query Burghersdorp), next of kin and creditors of Robert SMITH and surviving spouse Eliza SMITH, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,618.
November 17 – At Eland’s Post, next of kin and creditors of Henry COCHRANE, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,619.
November 17 – At Queen’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Arnold SHEPPERSON, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,619.
November 17 – At Middelburg, next of kin and creditors of Barend Daniel PRETORIUS, of the Middelburg district, and surviving spouse Elizabeth Magdalena PRETORIUS, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,619.

Friday 10 November 1876

DIED on the 30th of September, at Farme, near Rutherglen, Lanarkshire, Scotland, James FARIE, Esq., of Farme and West-thorn, J.P. and D.L., in his 77th year.

LATEST TELEGRAMS
Cape Town: Wednesday.
Roman arrived at Madeira. Passengers for Algoa Bay – Messrs. WINN, GEARD, HENNEMEYER, HILDER, [RIEL], DURRACH, FIUGGE, CLARKE, DREIFER, REGENSTEIN, Mr. and Mrs. GEARD, Mr. and Mrs. JONES, Mrs. CAROLIN, Miss HALLACK, HAZELTON, WILLMOT.

DANGEROUS ASSAULT – During Saturday a man well known in Graham’s Town went to the Magistrate’s Court with his arm bleeding profusely from having been stabbed with a knife by a German named Herman KUTCHER. The police serjeant, knowing Mr. KUTCHER’s haunt, despatched constable VAN DER AU in search of him, and in less than half-an-hour the said KUTCHER found himself in safe keeping in “Bishop’s Hotel”. – Journal.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT – Before A. C. WYLDE, Esq., CC and RM
Tuesday, November 7, 1876
Charles LEWIS was charged with stealing £1, the property of James McCARTHY. The evidence was not satisfactory, and the prisoner was discharged.
Thomas McLOUGHLIN was charged with stealing £7 from Daniel HOGAN. The money was lost whilst the accused was in the house. He had no money prior to the theft, but immediately afterwards he disappeared from the place, and was flush of money. Remanded until the following day.
Alleged Fraudulent Insolvency – Jacob GUITES, and Leah, his wife, were charged under the Insolvent Ordinance with concealing goods after surrendering their estate. Mr. DYASON appeared for the prosecution, Mr. INNES for the defence. Mr. MARKS (KIRKWOOD, MARKS & Co.) proved that on the 15th and 16th October the woman purchased at their sale goods to the value of £15[…] 5s. 6d., which were at her request entered to “cash […]”. The goods had not been removed. He did not know whether the business was hers or her husband’s. William [HARKAM] said as he was taking the woman to the lock-up he told her she was going there to be searched, as she was suspected of having jewellery about her, and she then took from her pocket [8] watches, 1 set of studs, 4 keepers, [8] wedding rings, 2 lockets, and 1 chain. She said Mr. [DOITCH] gave her these to dispose of. By Mr. INNES: I cautioned her that anything she might say would be used against her. I know there is a shop in Queen-street which the female prisoner attends to. The female prisoner said HARKHAM had made a mistake. She said she had got the rings from Mr. DOITCH, but not the watches. Mr. Isaac DOITCH (I. DOITCH & Co.) said he had had dealings with both the prisoners, but all the goods were charged to Jacob GUITES. Mrs. GUITES had very often been to the warehouse and bought goods, and sometimes one had paid and sometimes the other. Between the 22nd October, 1875, and 22nd May, 1876, he roughly estimated their purchases at £[134 3s. 4d.]. Since May they had bought goods, but always for cash. Could not swear what cash purchases have been made since that time. There was a cash balance in the account put in of £17 19s., and witness took over a cart and horses in payment of that in the early part of December. Witness always understood that Mrs. GUITES carried on business apart from her husband. The reason they did not charge to the female prisoner was that they did not recognise a woman when there was a husband. Since the committal of the prisoners he (witness) handed over a parcel to the officials, but knew nothing of its contents. On going home the day prisoners were arrested Mrs. DOITCH told him there had been a parcel […], and he accordingly handed it over to the Magistrate. Had never seen it before, and did not know it was in her possession. The parcel was here opened, and contained a miscellaneous assortment of jewellery. Witness continued: The goods produced I have never seen before to my knowledge. From the marks I do not think the […] came from my store. Mr. BLOCH [then] came forward and recognised the watches. Mrs. GUITES (to BLOCH): Leave my vatches alone, you vicked man! leave them alone! By Mr. DYASON: I recollect GUITES rushing into my shop and saying that the police were in his house, and should he let them search the place? I will swear he did not give me £100, or anything else. By Mr. INNES: The storeman and my two sons were present when GUITES rushed in, and must have seen if anything had passed between us. If I had received £100, as had been said, it would appear in the books. I deny distinctly that I received any such sum. It is utterly false. The male prisoner was a sort of traveller, and the other prisoner managed the town business. Both bought the same kind of goods. Mrs. DOITCH is not able to attend in court, as she has been in bed for some time past. She was in bed when Mrs. GUITES left the parcel. Leah SCHRUNK, wife of Abraham SCHRUNK, said: I remember the day when the prisoner’s house was searched – on the 20th Nov. I was in Main-street about midday when I saw Mr. GUITES running on, and he looked very pale. While he was running I heard the money rattling in his pocket. When he saw me he stopped for a minute. He then began to walk fast, and as he crossed the street opposite Mr. DOITCH’s store, he took a brown bag out of his right-hand pocket. He then went into DOITCH’s store. I went over to Mr. CAITHNESS, who I knew to be a creditor, and told him. He asked me to go over, and I went. Mr. DOITCH was in the doorway, and I said to him, “Mr. DOITCH, you took the money from Mr. GUITES.” He said, in German, “Keep quiet, you are not a creditor.” I replied in English, “Well, if I am not a creditor, you’ve no business to take the money.” Mr. DYASON was coming on, and heard us speaking. I said to him, “Mr. DYASON, don’t you consider it a shame for Mr. DOITCH to take from Mr. GUITES his creditors’ money?” Mr. DYASON said, “Mr. DOITCH, is that your business to take money away from other creditors?” As I approached the door, GUITES was running past the Bank. By the Magistrate: I did not see GUITES hand Mr. DOITCH any money. Witness (excitedly): I belong to the brotherhood of Israel, and there is a judgment above as well as here. I would not speak false. By Mr. INNES: I was excited when I went to Mr. DOITCH, but not so much as you think. I took it coolly. He did not say, “Keep quiet, don’t make a noise.” GUITES: I should like to ask Lady SCHRUNK a question. Some further evidence having been given, the prisoners were remanded until Thursday.
Wednesday, November 8, 1876.
Thomas McLAUGHLIN, on remand, was charged with the theft of £7 from Daniel HOGAN. Prosecutor said on Saturday last the prisoner bought the articles produced from his shop, for which he paid £3 10s. The Magistrate said, taking all the circumstances, they exclusively pointed to prisoner as the thief, and he would be sentenced to three months’ hard labour. Prisoner said it was very hard that he should be punished for spending his own money.
Cornelius BROWN, charged with setting fire to Mr. John ADCOCK’s house, at Walmer, was remanded until Thursday.
Thursday, November 9.
Walter YOUNG, a cabman, was charged by George WILSON with refusing to take him to the North-end. The case was proved and prisoner was fined 10s.
Cornelius BROWN was charged on remand with setting fire to a house at Walmer. No further evidence of the prisoner’s guilt was adduced, and two of prisoner’s fellow workmen swore that he did not leave the quarry during the day. His Worship said the evidence was too weak to convict the prisoner, and he must discharge him. He must, however, find bail for making use of threatening language. Mr. McCAULEY stood bail for the prisoner.
Jacob GUITES, and Leah, his wife, were again charged with fraud under the Insolvent Ordinance. The witnesses required to complete the case were not present, and it was again adjourned until Tuesday. Mr. INNES, for the defence, applied that Mrs. GUITES might be released on bail. At present there was no case against her, as she was acting under her husband’s orders. His Worship said he would accept two sureties in £50 each for her appearance.
Alexander GEDDES was charged with using threatening language to Police Constable CUNNINGHAM. The accused had, it seemed, together with a crowd of other persons, [cried] shame on the manner in which a drunken sailor, who was being conveyed to gaol, was treated, and had, according to the constable’s evidence, abused him and endeavoured to overturn the hand-cart in which the prisoner was placed. Fined £2.

POSTSCRIPT – UP-COUNTRY NEWS
East London – A diver named BARTLETT, on Friday, whilst in a state of liquor, was drowned in endeavouring to get on the wreck of the Hohenzollern.

LOCAL AND GENERAL

SUDDEN DEATH – A maiden lady, named KLOPPERS, 74 years of age, died suddenly at Simon’s Town on Wednesday, after having risen in her usual health.

SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM – His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to appoint Roland TRIMEN, Esq., F.L.S., F.Z.S., to be the curator of the South African Museum, the appointment to date from the 1st of July, 1876.

BANKRUPTCY COURT – Insolvency declared. November 2 – Abraham Joshua DE VILLIERS, deceased, late of Steyn’s Kraal, division of Beaufort West; assets, £2,562 0s. 4d., liabilities, £3,174 3s. 11d., deficiency, £612 3s. 7d.
Appointments – Pieter Nicolaas HUGO, Esq., to be a Justice of the Peace for the district of Caledon, during pleasure. Petrus Jacobus HUGO, Esq., to be a Justice of the Peace for the district of Wynberg, during pleasure.

The R.M.S. Asiatic, Capt. E. MANNING, will leave this port this afternoon for Southampton, via Mossel and Table Bays, with […] the following passengers: For Cape Town – Mr. BOWLER, Mrs. BOWLER and two children, Mrs. P. SMITH, Mr. BRUNDERBERG; For Southampton – Mr. LEVY, Mrs. LEVY and child, Mr. [I.] PASCOE, Mr. D. BLACK, Mr. [LEHMANN].
The R.M.S. Florence, Captain J. FULTON, R.N.R., sailed from this port on Tuesday evening last for Natal, via Port Alfred and East London, with […] the following passengers (in transit on Walmer Castle): For East London – Rev. J. D., Mrs., Masters, and Misses DOE and servant, Mrs. MACLEAN and servant, Sergeant WHENMAN, R.E., Messrs. COLLICOTT, PITMAN, and R. T. P. B. DAVIES; For Natal – Rev. Mr. and Mrs. MASON, infant, and servant, Misses MASON, CLARKE, and E. MARSDEN, Masters MASON, Messrs. A. GREY, C. A. MULLER, W. E. HERLEY, F. POLHILL, F. [NEBOUL], JONES, C. [MIRAD], A. and W. COLSON, T. CROHILL, J. BAILEY, W. LANGMEESTER, P. THOMPSON, and HAWORTH; From this port for Port Alfred – Constable ROGERS and 9 prisoners; For East London – Messrs. M. D. JOHNSON, T. SANDERS, H. P. BARRON, IVESON, [ROODT], SHAW, and 1 deck passenger; For Port Natal – Miss HERBERT, Messrs. J. McMUIR, E. SCHREIVER, J. [WHEALEY], and 34 Kafirs.

FREE STATE – The death is announced at Bloemfontein of Mr. William COLLINS, one of the oldest officials in the State, and who for many years contributed in the Dutch columns of the Friend of the Free State. Mr. COLLINS was a man of high attainments, and had long served the Free State in various official capacities.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE
Arrived in Algoa Bay
November 7 – Kafir, R.M.S. (of Southampton), Capt. A. J. GARRETT, from Zanzibar [26]th October, Natal 4th November, East London 6th November, Port Alfred 7th ditto for this port and Table Bay; […] Passengers: For this port – Messrs. [S.] RODOLF, L. RODOLF, LOVING, CHIVERS, JOHNSON, MARTIN, TENNANT, [PEEL], CARPENTER, JEFFREY, POOLING, GIBBS, COOMBS, JUSTIN, KINGSTON, EVANS, DUNSTON, [POULEMAR], KEMPTHORNE, [...]KTE, and Miss BARNARD, and 31 Kafirs; For Cape Town – Rev. Mr. and Mrs. WILDER, LITTLEWOOD, Messrs. [WITSTRIK] and LITTLEWOOD, and 31 Kafirs; For England – Dr. PEARSON, R.N., Mr. and Mrs. RICHARDSON, Mr. DYKER and servant, Messrs. EARP, [HULLERAN], BENNETT, GREEN, and 5 naval invalids.
Nov. 9 – Olsen, , Capt. A. [TENNEMAN], from Foo Chow [27]th Aug. for this port and Table Bay. Passenger: [F.] W. FRY.

MEETINGS IN INSOLVENT ESTATES
November 11 – At Queen’s Town, in re James SMITH of the division of Queen’s Town, farmer, third. William J. QUIN, trustee. No. 5,622.
November 11 – At Fort Beaufort (query short notice), in re James SMITH of the division of Queen’s Town, farmer, third. William J. QUIN, trustee. No. 5,622.
November 12 – At Cradock, in re James SCHOOLING, of Cradock, carpenter, first. No. [5,614].
November 13 – At Mossel Bay, in re William Turner WILKINSON, of Kieviet’s Kraal, division of Mossel Bay, farmer, second. No. 5,615.
November 13 – At Stockenstrom (query Seymour), in re Johannes Frederick BOTHA of the district of Stockenstrom, farmer and carrier, first. No. […]
Nov. 14 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Willem Hendrik BRUMMER, of Graaff-Reinet, carrier (2nd surrender), first. No. 5,627.
November 15 – At Middelburg, in re George INNES, of Middelburg, third. W. A. WENTZEL, jun., trustee. No. 5,623.
November 15 – At Port Elizabeth, in re Charles SONNENBERG, formerly of Queen’s Town, merchant, but at present residing at Kimberley, Griqualand West, diamond buyer, first. No. 5,627.
November 15 – At Burghersdorp, in re Henry RIDLEY, of Burghersdorp, watchmaker, second. No. 5,624.
November 15 – At Burghersdorp, in re Franz Heinrich HOLM and Alexander Fraser MACKINTOSH, carrying on business together under the style or firm of Franz HOLM & Company, of Nooitgedacht, division of Albert, shopkeepers and pontoon keepers, second. No. 5,624.
November 17 – At East London, in re Gerhardus SNYMAN, of Maclean, in the division of East London, carrier, second. No. 5,624.
November 17 – At East London, in re Mathys Jacobus Human SNYMAN of Kwelegha, division of East London, carrier, first. No. 5,625. [M. J. H. SNYMAN, marriage: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:ZNL5-9LMM ]
November 17 – At Somerset East, in re Willem Abraham DE KLERK, Jan’s son, of Karkot’s Kraal, division of Somerset East, second. No. 5,624.
November 18 – At Richmond, in re Charl William GILDENHUSY [recte GILDENHUYS?], of Rhenosterfontein, division of Hope Town, third. I. P. J. VAN DER POEL, trustee. No. 5,618.
November 20 – At Cradock, in re James SCHOOLING, of Cradock, carpenter, second. No. 5,625.
November 20 – At Cradock, in re George Frederick AUSTEN, of Cradock, special. George ARMSTRONG, trustee. No. 5,621.
November 20 – At Stockenstrom (query Seymour), in re Johannes Frederick BOTHA, of the division of Stockenstrom, farmer and carrier, second. No. 5,621.
November 20 – At Middelburg, in re Jan Marthinus EVERTSE (deceased), late of Middelburg, painter, first and final. No. […]
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Stephanus MEINTJES, third. A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. 5,622.
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Willem Hendrik BRUMMER, of Graaff-Reinet, carrier (2nd surrender), second. No. 5,627.
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Jasper Francois Alwyn BOLLEURS, third. A. HARTZENBERG, jun., and C. A. T. DE GRAAFF, trustees. No. 5,622.
November 22 – At Port Elizabeth, in re Charles SONNENBERG, formerly of Queen’s Town, merchant, but at present residing at Kimberley, Griqualand West, diamond buyer, second. No. 5,627.
November 22 – At Graham’s Town, in re Frederick LUCAS, special. [Hen.] H. ATTWELL, trustee. No. 5,6[28].
November 24 – At East London, in re Mathys Jacobus Human SNYMAN, of Kwelegha, division of East London, carrier, second. No. 5,626.
November 25 – At Fort Beaufort, in re Joseph Arthur TROLLIP, of G[…] Farm, near Alice, Victoria East, farmer and carrier, third. William J. QUIN and W. J. MUGGLETON, trustees. No. 5,626.
November [28] – At Wodehouse (query Dordrecht), in re Nicolas Grobelaar OLIVIER, of the district of Wodehouse, third. [Spencer] FLEISCHER, trustee. No. 5,626.
December 4 – At Cradock, in re Albert HADLOW, of Cradock, third. Robert [HARE], trustee. No. 5,626.
December 4 – At Cradock, in re William Cathcart DONNELL, of Cradock, third. Robert HARE, trustee. No. 5,620. [William Cathcart DONNELL, burial, Cradock, 21 Dec 1876: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:6FYQ-JZ7X ]
December 5 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re James Charles HURFORD, third. A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. 5,626.

INTESTATE ESTATES
November 14 – At Graaff-Reinet, next of kin and creditors of Maria Isabella TUA, a widow of the Graaff-Reinet district, to appoint executors dative, &c. Gazette, No. 5,618.
November 15 – At Port Elizabeth, next of kin and creditors of Mary TRUMAN (born PULLENGER), a widow of the Port Elizabeth district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,618.
November 15 – At Albert (query Burghersdorp), next of kin and creditors of Robert SMITH and surviving spouse Eliza SMITH, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,618.
November 17 – At Eland’s Post, next of kin and creditors of Henry COCHRANE, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,619.
November 17 – At Queen’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Arnold SHEPPERSON, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,619.
November 17 – At Middelburg, next of kin and creditors of Barend Daniel PRETORIUS, of the Middelburg district, and surviving spouse Elizabeth Magdalena PRETORIUS, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,619.
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, next of kin and creditors of Fredrika Elizabeth MEINTJES (born BLOM), of the Graaff-Reinet district, and surviving husband Willem Hendrik Stephanus MEINTJES, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,620. [Marriage of F.E. BLOM and W.H.S. MEINTJES: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:8PSQ-59T2]
November 22 – At Albert (qu[e]ry Burghersdorp), next of kin and creditors of Johanna Hendrina COETZEE (born DU PLESSIS), widow of Jacobus COETZEE, of the Albert district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,628.
November 23 – At Hanover, next of kin and creditors of Friederich Wilhelm TAIT, of the Hanover district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. […]
November 24 – At Peddie, the paternal and maternal relations of the minors Friedricke BERLIN, Albertina BERLIN, and Carl Franz BERLIN, minor children of the late Carel Gottlieb Otto BERLIN, and subsequently deceased spouse, Henrietta Wilhelmina Christina BERLIN (born JUDENSCHWAGER), to appoint executors dative, &c., &c. No. 5,624.
November 25 – At Beaufort West, next of kin and creditors of Wilhelmina Maria LE GRANGE (born JANSE VAN RENSBURG), of the Beaufort West district, and surviving husband Pieter Andries LE GRANGE, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
November 28 – At Port Elizabeth, next of kin and creditors of William PYE, of the Port Elizabeth district, and subsequently deceased spouse Ann PYE (born BANKS), to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
November 29 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Edward HULLEY and his predeceased spouse Mary HULLEY (born GRADWELL), to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
November 29 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Thomas FRANCIS, the Elder, of the Albany district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,622.
November 30 – At Cradock, next of kin and creditors of Sarah Johanna Elizabeth FOURIE (born SANDERS), of the Cradock district, and surviving husband Johannes Hendrick FOURIE, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
December 1 – At Somerset East, next of kin and creditors of Anna Margaretha Caroline ERASMUS (born DE VILLIERS), widow of Lourens Jacobus ERASMUS, of the Somerset East district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,6[…].
December 6 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Mary Ann GODDARD (born HELY), of the Albany district, and surviving husband William GODDARD, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,623.
December 6 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of William McCARTER, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
December 8 – At Queen’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Cathrina [Cloina] Maria KIDSON (born ODENDAAL), of the Queen’s Town district, and surviving husband Joseph KIDSON, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,624.
December 8 – At East London, next of kin and creditors of Carl Herman Graeff, of the Oud[t]shoorn district, and surviving spouse, Ann GRAEFF (born BROWN), since remarried to August PABST, to appoint executors dative, &c.
December 12 – At King William’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Edward WAINWRIGHT, of the King William’s Town district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,626.
December 13 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Sarah Frances HOLLAND (born [TONGE]), widow of Robert HOLLAND, of the Albany district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,630. [DN: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QPWR-FVQG]
December 14 – At Middelburg, next of kin and creditors of Lambertus Albertus VAN HEERDEN, of the Middelburg district, and surviving spouse Louisa Petronella VAN HEERDEN (born BOTHA), to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,626.

Tuesday 14 November 1876

DIED at the Retreat, Walmer, near Port Elizabeth, on the 10th November, [1876], of Croup, Charles Richard, the beloved Son of Mr. George BIRT, aged […] years 4 months and 4 days.

DIED, on the 26th October, 1876, Maria Johanna, aged 2 years, 7 months and 17 days, only daughter of Frederick William VAN REENEN and Henrietta KNOBEL.
Jacobsdal, O.F.S.,
2nd November, 1876.

LATEST TELEGRAMS
Cape Town, Sunday, Nov. 12.
Dunrobin Castle, Captain J. HOWSON, arrived on Saturday […] Algoa Bay passengers per Dunrobin Castle: Messrs. VOGEL, ZEEDERBERG, [PLAYER], [KUHN], […], VAN PRAAGH, BROOKER, GOWER, […], […], CASTLEDEN, CLARK, BUTLER, FAGG, […], […], WAGNER, GRIEVE, SWALE, CLARK, […], BARNES, MITCHELL, R[…], S[…], […], […]ES, […], K[…], TR[AVERS], {…], [NORTH…], BROWN, GILBERT, SAMPSON, RICHARDSON, [J.] SEDGEMOOR, WILLIAMS, […], […], [HOYLE], HARVEY, BOLL[…], MAY, […], Mr. and Mrs. A.[WILMOT] and family, Mr. [BRISTER] and family, Mr. and Mrs. [HORTON] and family, […] Mr. and Mrs. HUNTER, Mrs. ARMSTRONG and family, Mr. […], Mrs. ANDERSON, Mrs. MACFAR[…], Mr. and Mrs. [SIMPSON] and family, Mr. and Mrs. […] and family, Mr. and Mrs. J[…], Messrs. MURRAY, […], […], BLACKWELL, […] and […]; For East London – Mr. and Mrs. […]LIN, Messrs. [HOOD], […]ERY […].
Sir John COODE and WILMOT arrived [by the Dunrobin Castle]. [An extended article on COODE follows.]
Captain of Windsor Castle [(HOWAT)] suspended nine months; GREY, second officer, three months. [An extended article on the official inquiry into the circumstances of the wreck of the Windsor Castle follows.]
MARILLAC’s trial adjourned three months. Could not obtain bail, and was lodged in gaol.
Cashier of Stellenbosch Bank arrested; charged with £20,000 defalcations. Chairman, WEGE, committed suicide. [An extended article on the case follows: the cashier was Willem HEROLD, the bookkeeper R. VAN REENEN, and the directorate were: J. WEGE, chairman, H. L. NEETHLING, C. HEYNES, W. A. KRIGE, P. A. MYBURGH, M. L. NEETHLING, W.A. JOUBERT.]

KIMBERLEY – Resident Magistrate’s Court, before R. K. H. D’ARCY, Esq., R.M.
Thursday, November 2, 1876
Henry TUCKER, the junior member for Kimberley in the Legislative Council of Griqualand West, was brought up. The Clerk of the Peace (R. L. SCHOLTZ, Esq., J.P. and R.M.) prosecuted on behalf of the Crown; Mr. T. M. SIDDALL, attorney-at-law, appeared for the defence, together with Mr. P. L. BUYSKES. The accused was allowed to stand immediately behind his attorney. There were three counts to the indictment, charging the prisoner with buying diamonds from Louis Woolf COHEN in January, March, and April last. Mr. SIDDALL excepted to the indictment as being indefinite, informal, and bad in law. The indictment, he stated, did not name particular days, nor did it give the weight of the diamonds and other necessary details. Mr. SIDDALL quoted authorities in support of the exceptions. He applied that the indictment be quashed. The Clerk of the Peace replied that these exceptions had already been over ruled by His Worship. All he (the Clerk of the Peace) had to do was to prove that the crime was committed within three months of the date mentioned in the indictment. Mr. SIDDALL replied that in this case the date was the essence of the offence. He (Mr. SIDDALL) did not wish to have the case thrown out on a technicality; he wished to state that openly. His Worship over-ruled the exceptions, but stated that he had noted them on the record. The prisoner then pleaded “not guilty” on all the counts of the indictment. Captain CARR, examined by the Clerk of the Peace, deposed: I am distributor of Stamps for the Province of Griqualand West. I produce my register of persons licensed to deal in diamonds. Henry TUCKER is not at present a dealer in diamonds. He was so in July, 1874 but the licence expired on the 31st of December of the same year. It has not since been renewed. He has had no licence during this year. The accused is not a banker. Cross-examined by Mr. SIDDALL: I am sure the licence expired in December, 1874, and has not been since renewed. I am Distributor of Stamps for the whole province; there are no other Distributors of Stamps for diamond licences. The document produced is in my handwriting. It is the old licence, and it is there stated that it expires in July, 1875. Louis Woolf COHEN, examined by the Clerk of the Peace, deposed: I am a diamond dealer, residing at Kimberley. I know the accused, Henry TUCKER. I have had diamond transactions with him this year. I remember purchasing a diamond from Mr. E. S. LEE for £60. That was about January, this year. My register (produced) states the date as the 17th January, and the weight as 24 carats. I sold that diamond again to Mr. TUCKER; I am not quite certain for how much. I have been paid for the diamond by Mr. TUCKER. I will swear I sold the diamond within a month after I purchased it – I think about three weeks. I sold some more diamonds to Mr. TUCKER. One was a 14 carat piece of cleavage, and the sale took place about the month of April, for £23. I was paid for that stone by a cheque. The cheque was dishonoured at the bank. I know the cheque produced; it is Mr. TUCKER’s (cheque marked C. for £23, dated September 12th, 1876). When the first cheque got too old, I took it to Mr. TUCKER, and got the one that has been put in. It was given to me as a renewal of the old cheque, and the old cheque was given to me in payment for the diamond. I passed the cheque produced over to Mr. L. J. WOOLFF. I could not say whether I had any other transactions between the dates I have stated. By Mr. SIDDALL: I have not laid any information against Mr. TUCKER voluntarily. I have only answered the questions of the Clerk of the Peace. I do not know what Mr. TUCKER did with the diamonds I have spoken of. I believe one was sold to Mr. STONE, but I am not certain of it. Mr. TUCKER was sued on the cheque for £23. The money has been paid. Re-examined by the Clerk of the Peace: The money was paid the day before yesterday in this Court. By Mr. BUYSKES: I don’t think anyone was present when I sold the diamonds to Mr. TUCKER; I can say for certain in respect to one case. Mr. Ellis Lawrence LEE deposed: I am a diamond dealer, living in Kimberley. I know the last witness, COHEN. I produce my register. On the 17th January I sold him a diamond, 24¼ carats, for £60. I have not the slightest idea what became of that diamond. Louis John WOOLF, deposed: I live at Kimberley, and know COHEN. I know the accused, Henry TUCKER. I saw a cheque for £23 drawn by the accused in favour of COHEN. Z. J. DE BEER, a clerk in the office of the Resident Magistrate, deposed: I keep a register of permits to buy and sell diamonds granted by the Resident Magistrate. I produce my register. Henry TUCKER has not had a permit to buy during this year. This was the case for the Crown. Mr. SIDDALL closed his case for the defence without calling any evidence. Before the arguments were gone into the accused was charged on another indictment with acting as a broker in May last without having a license to do so. The same exceptions were raised to this indictment and overruled. Louis COHEN deposed: I am a diamond dealer, residing at Kimberley. I know the accused. I remember seeing him about May, 1876, at his office. Another gentleman was there whom I did not know. TUCKER said, “COHEN, there’s a gentleman going to England, if you have anything fit for the market you might send it by him.” I said I had a parcel by me, and showed it to him. He asked me the price, and I said, “Something over £90.” The gentleman said, “I suppose you mean £80.” I said I couldn’t exactly calculate, and the gentleman said, “No matter, I’m not going just yet.” I said, “All right, I’ll leave them with Mr. TUCKER, and he can tell me what is the highest you will give for them.” Things remained thus, when about the end of the month Mr. TUCKER said, “I think I can get you £85, and if I can do you a good turn I will do so. I think it is a good price.” I said very well, I would leave it in his hands. A few days afterwards Mr. TUCKER called, and gave me £85. Then he asked me if I could lend him £60. I did so, and a few days afterwards he gave a good-for. I did not bargain with the stranger for the £85. I said, “If you think I can’t get more I’ll take it.” I believe the diamonds were sold for £85. By Mr. SIDDALL: I did not pay Mr. TUCKER any commission for that or reward of any sort. I was the owner of the diamonds and the seller. The seller always pays the commission to the broker. I have been in the diamond trade 15 or 16 months. I commenced the negotiation. Mr. SIDDALL, examined by the Clerk of the Peace: I have been subpoen[a]ed to produce a good-for signed by the accused. I did not receive it personally. I can’t say when I received it. Captain CARR: Mr. Henry TUCKER does not hold a broker’s licence, and has not held one at any time during this year. I am the only issuer of broker’s licenses in this Province. An adjournment took place until half-past two o’clock. On re-assembling of the Court, the Clerk of the Peace briefly addressed His Worship in support of the indictments, saying that a clearer case of contravention of the ordinance had not come under his notice. Mr. SIDDALL followed for the defence, contending at length that it was never the intention of the legislature to inflict so heavy a punishment, as a minimum, of twelve months’ imprisonment, for an offence of a kind alleged to have been committed by the accused. And further Mr. SIDDALL contended that the charges had not been clearly proved, concluding by claiming for his client the most favourable construction of the evidence and the benefit of the doubt which, he argued, existed. Mr. BUYSKES entered at length into what he believed to have been the intention of the Legislature when the ordinance in question was framed, and made an earnest appeal on behalf of the accused. His Worship found TUCKER not guilty of the charge of brokering without a licence, and not guilty on the first and second counts of the indictment. As regards the third count His Worship could not do otherwise than consider it proved, but he would inflict the lowest punishment the law allowed, namely, twelve months’ imprisonment without hard labour. Of course, said His Worship, his interpretation of the ordinance might not be the correct one, and until the sentence had come under review by the Recorder he would admit the accused to bail.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT – Before A. C. WYLDE, Esq., CC and RM
Friday, November 10, 1876
Eliza BURGERS was charged with leaving the service of Mr. E. CASTENS without notice. The prosecutor deposed that the prisoner was under an engagement to him, and she left suddenly without notice, and, as she could not be found, he applied for a warrant, and she was arrested at the house of a person named WRAXWORTHY. The Magistrate said gentlemen went to an enormous expense in getting servants out, and they were no sooner here than some one tempted them away. Mr. O’BRIEN, for the defence, said Mrs. CASTENS had told the girl, in the presence of two other servants, to go away altogether, and she had gone. The case was postponed for the production of the two servants. Mr. CASTENS: Your Worship, if there is any false swearing I shall proceed to the utmost. His Worship told the defendant that she must in the meantime go back to her master. Defendant: I won’t go back, I will rather go to the tronk. His Worship: I can’t allow servants to set their employers at defiance in this manner. The girl still persisted in her refusal to go back to Mr. CASTENS, and was released on bail until Monday.
Thomas POWELL was charged with creating a disturbance at the Railway Terminus. Prisoner, in a drunken state, went to the booking-office between four and five, and as he made a great noise the police were sent for, and he was locked up. He made use of very bad language. Mr. BROWN said there was a previous conviction against the man for a similar offence. Fined £1 or 14 days’ hard labour.
Saturday, November 11, 1876
J[…] VAN DER [STOER] was charged with fighting in Queen-street. William Arthur HOWARD, a shopkeeper in Queen-street, proved the offence. Fined 5s.
John PONSELL was charged with attempting to rescue the last prisoner. HOWARD said as they were bringing the last prisoner to the tronk PONSELL attempted to rescue him. No constable was present. Discharged with a caution.
Klaas FARQUHAR was charged with abusing William [WILDIN] and William NIXON. The persons who gave the prisoner in charge were not present, and he was discharged.
SOLOMON pleaded guilty to selling Kafir beer without a license. Fined £5, or one month’s imprisonment.
Monday, November 13, 1876
Eliza BURGERS was charged, on remand, with leaving the service of Mr. E. CASTENS. [Sa]rah SAMUELS, another servant in the same employ, stated that she did not hear the mistress tell Eliza to go away. She went away on Sunday week at 3 o’clock, and had not since returned. Mrs. CASTENS said to Eliza some time ago, “The next time you go out, you will be going for good.” The next time she went out she did go for good. His Worship: If she misunderstood her mistress, and now goes back, I will not punish her. If she refuses to go back, there is evidence of bad intent. The mistress can’t cancel the agreement. The defendant deposed that on the 29th Oct. she went out about 11, and returned at 1 o’clock. On her return her mistress asked her where she had been, and she replied to church. Mrs. CASTENS then said, “You had better go altogether.” Fined £2, or one month’s imprisonment, and to return to her service. Defendant: I won’t go back. Mr. CASTENS said he thought it was perfectly unjustifiable to allow her to go wandering about the streets with some fellow. He was her guardian, as she was entrusted to him by her parents. This has happened simply because he refused to allow some man to come to the house at night, and he should certainly not oppose her being respectably married. She told him the man was not going to marry her. The girl still refused to go back.
John MURRAY, for fighting in the street on Saturday afternoon, was fined 5s. or seven days’ imprisonment, and for seizing Police-constable POVEY and tearing his caps he was fined 10s. or seven days.
Tom [QUELAH] was charged on suspicion of theft of a quantity of blankets, sheets and other articles found in his possession. Mr. O’BRIEN appeared for the defence, and said the man picked the things up. His Worship: Well, then he ought to have brought them to the office. Mr. O’BRIEN: They don’t know that. His Worship: They have the same privileges as we have, and must submit to the same laws. Evidence was given as to the goods having been found in Tom’s hut, but there was no evidence as to whose property they were, and […] deposed that Tom picked them up at the North-end. His Worship: When they pick up things they must bring them to the Station. Fined 5s. or one day.
[WHITBOOY] was charged with assaulting Albert W[…] on Sunday morning, but, as the prosecutor did not appear, he was discharged.
James PULLENS, a man who was discharged on [his own] recognizances at the last Circuit Court, was charged with a breach of the peace by […]ing and […]ing. Police-sergeant CHERRY said the prisoner was half drunk on Sunday night, and was shouting [with] bad language in the street when people were going to church. Fined 5s. or seven days’ imprisonment.
William R[…], a man who had been brought [in] from the […] [party], was charged with stabbing a man in the [head]. The prisoner was apprehended by Field-c[ornet] P[…], but the injured man was in […] to attend. Evidence having been given by a man employed with the […] party as to the prisoner having committed the offence, he was remanded for further evidence.

LOCAL AND GENERAL

The Queen has been pleased to approve of Mr. Philip Thomas BLYTH as consul in Great Britain for the Orange Free State.

APPOINTMENT – Frederick [CHOUSE], Esquire, M.R.C.S.E., to be district Surgeon of Uniondale, with an allowance at the rate of £75 per annum from the date of assuming the duties of that office.

DEATH OF MR. KING – A telegram from Bedford reached Graham’s Town on Thursday morning, communicating the sad intelligence of the death of Mr. Thomas KING, sen., one of our most respected frontier colonials, and, may we […] to add, also of Graham’s Town, where his name ranks as the proprietor of considerable property, and where he spent the best portion of his life.

The R.M.S. Asiatic, Capt. E. MANNING, sailed from this port on Friday afternoon last for Southampton, via Mossel and Table Bays, with […] the following passengers: For Cape Town – Mr. [H. H.] BOWLER, Mrs. BOWLER and two children, Mrs. H[…]ITH, Mr. [G. H.] CHABAUD, Mr. [BREEDEBERG], Mr. G. JOHNSON, Mr. MAYES, [3] Kafirs; For Southampton – Mr. LEVY, Mrs. LEVY and child, Mr. [R.] PASCOE, Mr. [D.]BLACK, Mr. [B.] LEHMAIER.

BANKRUPTCY COURT – Insolvencies declared: November 4, George Richard BOYES, of Uitenhage division, agriculturist and carrier: assets, £1,730, liabilities, £2,535 10s., deficiency, £805 10s.; Nov. 6, James HASSAM, of Port Elizabeth, carter: assets, £530, liabilities, £724 6s. 8d., deficiency, £194 6s. 8d.; David Ferguson STEWART, of Port Elizabeth: assets, £1,482 3s. 5d., liabilities, £7,031 17s. 1d., deficiency, £5,549 13s. 8d.; Andries Bartolomeus JANSE VAN RENSBURG, of De Keur, division of Tulbagh, farmer: assets, £100 10s., liabilities, £304, deficiency, £203 10s.; Johannes Abraham KUYS, of the division of Caledon: assets, £128, liabilities, £803 16s., deficiency, £675 16s.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE
Arrived in Algoa Bay
Nov. […] – [R. H.] Wood, , Capt. G. M. NICHOLS, from Boston, U.S.A., [10]th August, for this port and East London. Passenger, Mr. A. R. [PRAY].
Nov. 11 – Anglian, R.M.S. (of Southampton), Capt. A. CLARK, from East London Oct. 10, for this port. Passengers: For this port – Mr. and Mrs. SELWYN, and Mr. CULVERWELL; For Cape Town – Deputy Commissary BRUNELL, Mr. and Mrs. HESKETH; For Southampton – Capt. [FULLS], Messrs. [SHORE] and HULSE.
Nov. [13] – Alice Campbell, , Capt. A. GRAHAM, from Boston 2nd August, for this port, […] Passengers: Captain’s wife and Mr. P. [HOLTON].

MEETINGS IN INSOLVENT ESTATES
November 15 – At Middelburg, in re George INNES, of Middelburg, third. W. A. WENTZEL, jun., trustee. No. 5,623.
November 15 – At Port Elizabeth, in re David Ferguson STEWART, of Port Elizabeth, first. No. […].
November […] – At Port Elizabeth, in re James HASSAM, of Port Elizabeth, carter, first. No. […].
November 15 – At Port Elizabeth, in re Charles SONNENBERG, formerly of Queen’s Town, merchant, but at present residing at Kimberley, Griqualand West, diamond buyer, first. No. 5,627.
November 15 – At Burghersdorp, in re Henry RIDLEY, of Burghersdorp, watchmaker, second. No. 5,624.
November 15 – At Burghersdorp, in re Franz Heinrich HOLM and Alexander Fraser MACKINTOSH, carrying on business together under the style or firm of Franz HOLM & Company, of Nooitgedacht, division of Albert, shopkeepers and pontoon keepers, second. No. 5,624.
November 17 – At East London, in re Gerhardus SNYMAN, of Maclean, in the division of East London, carrier, second. No. 5,624.
November 17 – At East London, in re Mathys Jacobus Human SNYMAN of Kwelegha, division of East London, carrier, first. No. 5,625. [M. J. H. SNYMAN, marriage: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:ZNL5-9LMM]
November 17 – At Somerset East, in re Willem Abraham DE KLERK, Jan’s son, of Karkot’s Kraal, division of Somerset East, second. No. 5,624.
November 18 – At Richmond, in re Charl William GILDENHUSY [recte GILDENHUYS?], of Rhenosterfontein, division of Hope Town, third. I. P. J. VAN DER POEL, trustee. No. 5,618.
November 18 – At Richmond, in re Johannes Francois CILLIERS, of Eselsfontein, division of Richmond, farmer, first. No. 5,617.
November 18 – At Beaufort West, in re Abraham Joshua DE VILLIERS (deceased), late of Steyn’s Kraal, in the division of Beaufort West, first. No. 5,617.
November 20 – At Cradock, in re James SCHOOLING, of Cradock, carpenter, second. No. 5,625.
November 20 – At Cradock, in re George Frederick AUSTEN, of Cradock, special. George ARMSTRONG, trustee. No. 5,621.
November 20 – At Stockenstrom (query Seymour), in re Johannes Frederick BOTHA, of the division of Stockenstrom, farmer and carrier, second. No. 5,621.
November 20 – At Middelburg, in re Jan Marthinus EVERTSE (deceased), late of Middelburg, painter, first and final. No. 5,62[6].
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Stephanus MEINTJES, third. A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. 5,622.
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Willem Hendrik BRUMMER, of Graaff-Reinet, carrier (2nd surrender), second. No. 5,627.
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Jasper Francois Alwyn BOLLEURS, third. A. HARTZENBERG, jun., and C. A. T. DE GRAAFF, trustees. No. 5,622.
November 22 – At Port Elizabeth, in re David Ferguson STEWART, of Port Elizabeth, second. No. 5,626.
November 22 – At Port Elizabeth, in re James HASSAM, of Port Elizabeth, carter, second. No. 5,629.
November 22 – At Uitenhage, in re George Richard BOYS, of [Botshanger], in the division of Uitenhage, agriculturist and carrier, first. No. 5,629.
November 22 – At Port Elizabeth, in re Charles SONNENBERG, formerly of Queen’s Town, merchant, but at present residing at Kimberley, Griqualand West, diamond buyer, second. No. 5,627.
November 22 – At Uitenhage, in re Marthinus KROG, of Uitenhage, special. H. N. CHASE, trustee. No. 5,627.
November 22 – At Graham’s Town, in re Frederick LUCAS, special. [Hen.] H. ATTWELL, trustee. No. 5,6[28].
November 24 – At East London, in re Mathys Jacobus Human SNYMAN, of Kwelegha, division of East London, carrier, second. No. 5,626.
November 25 – At Fort Beaufort, in re Joseph Arthur TROLLIP, of G[…] Farm, near Alice, Victoria East, farmer and carrier, third. William J. QUIN and W. J. MUGGLETON, trustees. No. 5,626.
November 25 – At Richmond, in re Johannes Francois CILLIERS, of Eselsfontein, division of Richmond, farmer, second. No. 5,627.
November [25] – At Uitenhage, in re George Richard BOYS, of [Botshanger] in the division of Uitenhage, agriculturist and carrier, second. No. 5,629.
November 29 – At Aliwal North, in re Edward GARDNER, special. J. [STANDON], trustee. No. 5,629.
November 29 – At Cape Town, in re Abraham Joshua DE VILLIERS (deceased), late of Steyn’s Kraal, division of Beaufort West, second. No. 5,627.

INTESTATE ESTATES
November 15 – At Port Elizabeth, next of kin and creditors of Mary TRUMAN (born PULLENGER), a widow of the Port Elizabeth district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,618.
November 15 – At Albert (query Burghersdorp), next of kin and creditors of Robert SMITH and surviving spouse Eliza SMITH, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,618.
November 17 – At Eland’s Post, next of kin and creditors of Henry COCHRANE, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,619.
November 17 – At Queen’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Arnold SHEPPERSON, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,619.
November 17 – At Middelburg, next of kin and creditors of Barend Daniel PRETORIUS, of the Middelburg district, and surviving spouse Elizabeth Magdalena PRETORIUS, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,619.

BIRTH, this morning, at Hope Lodge, Western Road, Mrs. C. P. HEUGH of a Daughter. 14th November, 1876.

Friday 17 November 1876

BIRTH on the 15th inst., at Albert House, Havelock-street, Mrs. H. W. [DALLDORF] of a Son.

DIED, on the 26th October, 1876, Maria Johanna, aged 2 years, 7 months and 17 days, only daughter of Frederick William VAN REENEN and Henrietta KNOBEL. Jacobsdal, O.F.S., 2nd November, 1876.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT – Before A. C. WYLDE, Esq., CC and RM
Tuesday, November 14.
William GRIFFIN, alias Joseph BULLOCK, was charged with causing the railway accident on the previous day. Mr. DYASON watched the case on behalf of the Railway Department, and there were also present Messrs. D. J. SCOTT, E. C. NORRIS, and A. HOWELL. His Worship said he would take a preliminary examination that he might see what charge should be preferred. William PHILIP, inspector of the line, deposed – The prisoner was a signalman, and was stationed at the 5½ mile point on the North Eastern Line between Port Elizabeth and Zwartkops. He went on duty at 6 o’clock yesterday morning, and had 12 hours to remain on duty. He had no one to relieve him during that period. His duty was to see that the main line was kept clear, for about a quarter of mile on either side of the station. At this spot there is a set of points, leading to a siding. His Worship: A rough diagram would assist me. Mr. NORRIS having drawn a diagram handed it to his worship. Witness continued: The siding was for ballast wagons. He had a time table in his box and knew the hours when to expect trains. When any train is expected his duty was to lock the points right for the main line and show a green flag. The green flag indicated “run with caution.” He could lock the points either way, and if locked from the siding the train must run there and if locked from the main line it must run on that line. He only locks for the siding when we are shunting ballast wagons. I was travelling by the 10 o’clock train yesterday. I was in the brake-van. Before coming to this point, I saw nothing, but I heard the danger whistle, when the engine must have been close upon the points. I was looking out of the brake-van, and I saw the engine going into the siding. We were travelling at the rate of about 6 miles an hour, with a heavy train. There is an incline towards the points of 1 in 100. The guard hadn’t time to get his brake to bear, but he screwed as much as he could. The engine ran on into the siding and came into collision with ten loaded ballast wagons and a water tank. The wagons were about 100 feet from the points. They were on the ballast siding in their proper position. I know the wagons had been shunted from the main line, Port Elizabeth side, from ten to fifteen minutes previously. Edward BENNET, the guard of the ballast train, had to see it done. He has reported to me that he saw it done. The ballast engine had, after the shunting, come back on the main line and gone on to Zwartkops. She must have cleared the points to get to Zwartkops, and they must therefore have been set right and locked for the main line; before another train could have gone into the siding, they must have been shifted again, and this ought not to have been done, as they should have remained locked from the main line traffic until another ballast train came. A considerable amount of damage was done to rolling stock. Some of the carriages were smashed to pieces, but no lives of passengers were lost, although they were much shaken and their lives very much endangered. I ascribe their safety to the low speed, and had the train been running fast many lives would have been lost. His Worship: See the necessity for the authorities using caution. There are continual complaints of trains running too slow, and see what would have been the result of a higher rate of speed in this case. Examination continued. After the accident I saw the points locked for the siding. Prisoner had the key of the lock of the points in his hand, and was standing in his right place with his flag. The green flag indicates “run with caution,” but it also means that the points are are [sic] right. Only when a red flag is shown would the engines have to stop. After the ballast engine had gone on to Zwartkops he must have reversed the points, and that effectually stopped the traffic on the main line. I cannot account for it. His Worship: It must have been wilful or through ignorance. Witness: He could not have known what he was about. He is an experienced pointsman, and for that reason and because he kept himself steady he was chosen for the job. He told me he didn’t know how he did it. He has been a sober man since I have known him. He has always before done his work very well, and there had never been so much as a wagon off the line. He was alone, but men were working about 100 yards from him. He had nothing to do but to attend to these points. I do not consider twelve hours too much for him. He would have several hours leisure during the day. There is nearly three hours in the afternoon when there is no traffic. There was no one to attend the points but him, and once he has locked them no one can alter. Even if he went away after locking the points right the train would be all right. After the accident occurred I took the key from him and unlocked the points. We got other engines from the Bay and from Zwartkops. The ganger in charge of the length has now to look after the points, but I’ve locked them and put the key in my pocket. Prisoner declined to ask any questions. What witness had stated was perfectly true. It was quite a mistake, and he believed till the accident the points were all right. His Worship: One often raises a gun, thinking it is cocked, and it is not. It is one of those unaccountable things in human nature. Examination continued: Coming down to the points, the engine driver did everything in his power to stop the train. Edward BERRY, the guard of the ballast train, deposed: I was working yesterday with the ballast engine at the [2½] mile point. We left Port Elizabeth at 9.30, and picked up ten ballast trucks and a water tank. We put them into the siding to clear the main line. The engine went into the siding, then uncoupled, and came out on to the main line. The pointsman then turned the points right for the main line, and we went on to Zwartkops as usual. After we passed I did look back, but I didn’t notice him altering the points. He ought not to have altered then. He was perfectly sober. When we went into the siding I called to him to alter the points, and let us in. He had the flag. The points must always be for the main line, unless a ballast engine wants to go into the siding, and then they must ask for them to be altered. This is the only siding on the main line between here and Zwartkops. It is necessary for the construction of the new line. So far as I have seen, the prisoner has always done his work properly. William WYCH, engine driver of the train, deposed: I have been a driver fourteen years. We approached the points in question at the rate of seven miles an hour. I had shut off steam as we approached the incline. That would be about 200 yards from the point[s]. At about 100 yards from the points I saw they were wrong. I had the breaks [sic] immediately put on, reversed the engine, and opened the guard’s whistle. I saw prisoner standing with a green flag some distance from the points. He was standing at a place where there had been a bridge, which is now being filled in, and which is necessary to use caution in crossing. He was in his right place. What I did lessened the force of the collision, and doubtless saved life, as if the engine had not been reversed, she would have run on and taken the broken carriages with her. As soon as she struck she stood and the trucks ran on. The sudden stop put one vehicle off the line, and although reversed, she would not go back with all that weight. I shut off steam when she struck. The cause of the accident was because of the points being turned to the siding instead of the main line, for which this man is responsible. If I had not seen the points in time more damage would have been done. His Worship: These things are like shipwrecks; the lives of the passengers are sometimes in the hands of one man. Witness: I know of nothing which would show that it was either by carelessness or malice that the accident occurred. The points have hitherto been perfectly right. Mr. DYASON, in closing his case, said there was no doubt the accident was caused by the negligence of the defendant, and it was for His Worship to decide whether he would punish him under the section or send him to the Judge. His Worship (to prisoner): Have you any witnesses? Prisoner: No, sir, I am very sorry for what has happened. His Worship: It is such a serious case that I must remit it to the Attorney-General, who will probably sent [sic] it down to me again. It is the first case that has occurred in the colony, and I think he ought to see this. I will admit you to bail in two sureties of £50 each.
Jacob and Leah GUITES was [sic] again placed in the dock, charged with contravention of the Insolvent Ordinance. JUMAI[DIEN], a Malay coach-builder at Uitenhage, said he sold two horses to Mrs. GUITES for £15. She gave him half in goods, but had not received the money yet. It was not good clothes. He only got £1 11s. in money. The horses are with him still, and he told them he would not deliver them up until the balance, £5, was paid. The prisoner was present at the time the horses were bought, and agreed to his wife’s bargain. The document produced is signed by prisoner’s son. The prisoner told me he had sent a lot of goods to Mrs. Henry [BOB] at Uitenhage. Prisoner: I was present when my son bought the horses. Witness: He told his son to sign the paper. Mrs. GUITES did not say the goods belonged to her son. A Hottentot carried the goods. I thought they belonged to the prisoners. His Worship (to prisoner): I am afraid you are bringing up your son in a bad way. The case was then remanded until Thursday. When the question of bail came up. Mrs. GUITES said (crying): Please let me out on bail; I will not go among the Jews. I have so many bad friends among them they will not let me get my little piece of bread. I will go and lodge with an Englishman over the river. I shall die, sir, I’m sure I shall, if I have to go to prison again. His Worship said that as the woman appeared ill, he should let her out on her own bail, to which Mr. DYASON offered no objection. The prisoner, after signing the bail bond kissed His Worship’s hand. His Worship: Go and kiss Mr. DYASON; don’t kiss me.
Captain Frederick Dyce WYNN was again placed in the dock on a charge of appropriating to his own use a watch, the property of the Hon. Mr. BARRINGTON. His Worship said this case had been sent back to him by the magistrate of Mossel Bay, and to complete the case it would be necessary for him to have the evidence of Mr. BARRINGTON. Mr. COWES said, to save the expense and delay that would be thus occasioned, his client would now plead guilty to the charge. His Worship: Very well; then I will send the papers to the Solicitor-General, and in a day or two I shall get them back again. The prisoner, having made the usual declaration, was removed from the court.
VIGILIANT and WHITBOOY, having pleaded guilty to breaking windows, the property of Mr. Joseph READ, were fined 10s. and ordered to pay 15s., the amount of damage done.
Wednesday, November 15.
Jan JANUARY, for contravening the Municipal Regulations, by depositing night soil in a forbidden spot, was fined £1.
John A. RUMBALL, Charles HANSEN, James HOWARD, and George LAWRENCE, able seamen of the barque Phæton, were charged with refusal of duty on three separate occasions. Mr. J. CHABAUD appeared for the prosecution. LAWRENCE and RUMBALL pleaded guilty, and the other two not guilty. Captain Thomas Henry BROWN said: I am master of the barque Phæton. We arrived here on the 25th September. I charge the prisoners with refusal of duty, twice on Tuesday and once this morning. The prisoners said they didn’t care about doing any more. By HANSEN: I told you I could not let you see the Magistrate about an assault by the second mate. I should have let you come when we had discharged the cargo. His Worship: Do you know you are liable to a fine for not allowing the men to see the Magistrate? Witness: I told them I would discharge the second mate if they would turn to. HOWARD said the second mate had struck him with an iron belaying-pin about two months ago at sea, and he had been kept as a prisoner on board the ship. The captain said he had heard no complaint about it until a few days ago. LAWRENCE, RUMBALL, and HOWARD were sentenced to a month’s imprisonment. His Worship said as HANSEN had not been allowed to come on shore when he wished to lodge a complaint, he would be discharged, on condition he went on board again. George APPLEYARD, second mate of the barque Phæton, was then charged with assaulting Charles HANSEN, by striking him on the head with a belaying-pin. Mr. J. CHABAUD, for the defendant, pleaded guilty under great provocation. Prosecutor said he was employed with others on Thursday night last in sweeping decks. The second mate was calling out for some one to take the broom. Witness was crossing the deck, and some words passed between him and prisoner, when the latter struck him on the head with a belaying-pin, and he (witness) bled like a pig. He was going to repeat the blow, when RUMBALL and LAWRENCE rushed up to him and prevented him. The prisoner then ran to his cabin, and locked the door. When the captain came on board on Saturday witness asked him to let him go to the magistrate, but he replied that he would discharge the mate, and he needn’t trouble about it. As the mate had not been discharged, he refused duty yesterday afternoon. John MAHON, steward, said on the evening in question he heard a row on the deck, and saw all hands in a cluster on the deck forward. When he went up the prisoner said, “Look here, steward, there’s another row about cleaning up the decks.” HANSEN challenged the prisoner to fight, and called him all sorts of disgusting names. Prisoner said to the chief mate that he would knock off, and turned to go away. HANSEN called out, “Go on, you cowardly ,” and prisoner turned back and struck him with a belaying-pin. Witness then held the prisoner back, and others took the pin from him. The prisoner and HANSEN then closed, and fell on the deck together. Captain BROWN said HANSEN had always been a quiet and orderly man up to this disturbance. By Mr. CHABAUD: On two or three occasions the second mate has not conducted himself to my satisfaction. His Worship said he thought, although the prisoner had evidently lost his temper, still HANSEN had begun the row, and he would be discharged.
Thursday, November 16.
Charles HANSEN, able seaman of the barque Phæton, was charged with refusing duty. The prisoner had only been sent on board the previous day, and he had no sooner got there than he refused to work. Sentenced to one month’s hard labour and to forfeit two days’ pay.
Peter [CURION] was charged with refusing duty on board the barque Clara. The captain of the vessel deposed to the prisoner’s refusing duty, but there seems to have been a scuffle, and the prisoner was somewhat knocked about. His Worship said the captain had taken the law in his own hands, and he could not now punish him. Case dismissed.

INSOLVENCY COURT – Before A.C. WYLDE, Esq., CC and RM
Tuesday, November 14.
Re Jacob GUITES – This was a meeting which had been adjourned until to-day for the examination of the Insolvent and other necessary business. The following claims were proved by Mr. DYASON: James Mc[CUSKIE] & Co. (promissory note) £34 4s. 6d.; Trustee in estate of Paul PERRIN (do.) £63 11s. 3d.; GIBSON Bros. (open account) £9 0s. 0d.; Mrs. ADCOCK ([…]) £14 19s.0d. Jacob GUITES, the insolvent, was then put in the witness-box, and examined by Mr. DYASON as follows: I surrendered my estate on the 15th October last year. I was a trader in general goods. There was a shop in the Bay, which belonged to my wife, but my name is over the door. The licence was in my name. I commenced business about thirteen months ago, when I came to Africa. I bought goods from I. DOITCH & Co. first, and afterwards from GODFREY & Co. and R. H. CAITHNESS & Co. I did the most business with Mr. DOITCH. I cannot remember when I made the last purchase with DOITCH, as I am no scholar. I kept no books, and trusted to memory. I kept no memorandum book. Mr. DYASON: Now, Mr. GUITES, recollect the truth is always the best, and the best way is to tell what you know, and try and be honest. Now, how many trading trips have you been? Witness: Three, sir, on my own account; they were my goods. The last trip I went to the district of the Fish River; I called at Graham’s Town when I came home. The value of the stock I took up was about £250. I cannot recollect what month it was when I went up. Mr. DYASON: Do you know what month this is? Insolvent: No, I don’t. Mr. DYASON: Really, sir, you should commit him; he is only trifling with the court. To insolvent: How many months are there in the year? Insolvent: I don’t know; I am no scholar. Mr. DYASON: How many days are there in the week, and what are they? Insolvent: I don’t know; I am too old to go to school now. Examination continued: The goods the last trip I made were bought from JONES, McCARLIE & Co., and Mr. CAITHNESS. By His Worship: I ascribe my insolvency to my accident in the Fish River. By Mr. DYASON: I paid £50 for two horses I started with, and the cart cost £20. The horses were knocked up, and I had to buy two others. I sold both in Graham’s Town, one for £2 and the other for £5. His Worship: Such a man as you ought not to be allowed to trade; you can’t give a straightforward answer. Mr. DYASON: Perhaps it would refresh his memory if he was locked up for a fortnight, and you can do that under the [64]th section. Examination continued: I swapped the two horses I took from the Bay, and gave a farmer £5 to boot in goods. When I left here I met with an accident in the Fish River, by which my goods were spoilt. I was glad to get anything for them. I swapped the goods for forage. The accident occurred near BOTHA’s, on the Fish River. My wife was at home minding the shop. I made no purchase in Graham’s Town. His Worship: He can’t remember anything. Mr. DYASON: No, sir; the Ordinance was specially framed to meet the case of a man like this. It is a deliberate fraud, and nothing else. His Worship: How is it that these minor insolvencies are pushed to the bitter end, and the larger ones are heard nothing about? Mr. DYASON: Most of the creditors are young beginners, and they came to me and instructed me to prosecute. Insolvent: I had a copper watch I gave Mr. BLOCH £15 for. The goods I took up went in expenses, and I brought home about £20. I met my wife in Graham’s Town, as she came up to see me about the copper watch. My wife went with me as far [as] Sand Flats. I know BLOCH, I wish I didn’t, if I had [not] I shouldn’t have been here (laughter). I told Mr. O’BRIEN I had some money due to me up country. I never offered Mr. BLOCH any bills of [BLANSBY]’s. I sold a cow to a black man some eight months ago. I sold my horses and cart of the value of £70 to Mr. DOITCH, before I went for the last trip. I cannot say exactly how much I gave for the horses. I did not get cash from DOITCH; he took them for debt. After I had sold my horses and cart, I had some stuff in my house. I had a meeting of my creditors in Mr. O’BRIEN’s office, and told them of my accident in Fish River, and offered them 3s. 6d. in the £. BLACKSTON Bros. sold me some goods for £[90]; I paid £18, and agreed with them to pay some after each trip. They sent Mr. O’BRIEN to me and told me that if I did not pay them they would sell me up. My wife went to Graham’s Town, and while she was there they emptied the house of everything they could lay their hands on. The reason Mr. DOITCH took the horses, was because he wanted his money. I told my creditors I would pay them if they would wait. Mr. DYASON remarked that DOITCH appeared to have swallowed up the whole assets, to the exclusion of the other creditors. Insolvent: Mr. DOITCH allowed me to take the horses on the last trip. I did not pay him cash, because I had no money. At the time I sold him the horses I owed money to Messrs. CAITHNESS, PERRIN, and McCARLIE, and I could not then pay them. Mr. CAITHNESS: At the meeting in O’BRIEN’s office you told me the goods in your shop were worth £[40]. His Worship: Did you say that? Insolvent: No, sir, I cannot recollect. Mr. CAITHNESS: I would not have valued it at £10. By Mr. DYASON: The day the search warrant was issued a gentleman (Mr. BROWN) came and asked me for the key of the shop. I went to find my wife, and got as far as DOITCH’s. I told him the officers were in my shop. I did not give him any money. If I had had any money I should have paid my creditors. His Worship: Yes, if you were an honest man, but people seem to doubt you very much. By Mr. DYASON: I did not leave a box of jewellery with Mrs. DOITCH, and my wife did not tell me she had done so. It belongs to my wife, not to me. I bought a dozen watches from Mr. PERRIN; some I took up country, and others I left with my wife. I did not buy any of the jewellery produced. They might have been bought by my wife. I cannot say whether these are the ones I bought from Paul PERRIN. His Worship remarked on the long time the examination was taking up. Mr. DYASON: Yes, sir; but the assets are so small I could not put the creditors to the expense of a commission. By Mr. DYASON: I [can’t] say whether these goods belong to my estate or not. His Worship: Of course they belong to the estate. I shall hand them over to the trustee. By Mr. DYASON: I did not know my wife had the jewellery upon her, which she gave up to the constable. The promissory note I signed in favour of Paul PERRIN was for goods supplied to me. My wife bought a lot of goods at KIRKWOOD, MARKS & Co.’s sale for “smousers”. I don’t know who the travellers were. Mr. DYASON: The insolvent and his wife go to a sale after the insolvency and buy £150 worth of goods for cash, and now he says they were bought for “smousers”. Insolvent: I don’t know who she bought them for. She did not buy them for me or for herself, as she had no money. Mr. DYASON: Look how he is playing the fool with the Court. He then quoted the 64th section of the Insolvent Ordinance, which he interpreted to the effect that the insolvent was liable to be committed. His Worship remarked the Act said if he refused to answer, but the insolvent does not refuse to answer – he only answers badly. Mr. DYASON said the insolvent had sworn that he was deficient £259 [5]s. 4d. Insolvent: It may be right or not, I don’t know. I can only read my son’s writing, give me any paper and I will sign it. I swore to whatever Mr. O’BRIEN put down. His Worship (to prisoner): You have not made a satisfactory explanation of your affairs, and you have kept no books, therefore you have committed culpable insolvency, and Mr. DYASON can, if he chooses, proceed with a preliminary examination for that offence.

The wreck of the Windsor Castle – [The final report on the judgment of the court on the wreck is given, signed by John CAMPBELL, resident magistrate, James BRUCE, commander R.N., and Hugh H. HANNAY, staff-commander, R.N., as nautical assessors.]

Stranger than Fiction – A Mr. OLIV[I]ER, a farmer in the Burghersdorp District, aged 74, and now married to his third wife, was (says Grensburger) presented the other day with his thirty-fifth child.

SUMMARY FOR ENGLAND
The R.M.S. Walmer Castle, Captain M. P. WEBSTER, will leave here this morning for London, via Mossel and Table Bays, with […] the following passengers: For Mossel Bay – Mr. E. T. ANDERSON; For Cape Town – Mrs. PIERS, Mrs. WALLACE, Mrs. BAUMANN, Deputy Com. BENNETT, Mr. ELTON, Mr. TITTERTON, Mr. J. WALLACE, Mr. C. WALLACE, Mr. W. TURNER, Mr. W. HAYES, 1 deck passenger; For London – Miss COOPER, Mr. G. B. CHADWICK, Mr. H. [HIESCHER], Mr. J. FORD.

LOCAL AND GENERAL

His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to accept the resignation of Captain George MURRAY, Victoria Rifle Volunteer Corps, from the 7th instant.

Samuel ISAACS – A warrant has been issued for the apprehension of Samuel ISAACS, who was charged with fraud at the criminal sessions of the Supreme Court, but who failed to answer to the indictment. The bail for his appearance was estreated.

APPOINTMENTS – Mr. G. STILWELL to be Field-cornet of the Ward Queen’s Town, in the division of Queen’s Town, in the room of Mr. A. N. [NILS] resigned. Dr. Benjamin W. HALL, as surgeon in the “Beaufort Rangers” Volunteer Corps, under date 20th September, 1876.

Welcome Back – Among the passengers by the R.M.S. African, which arrived here on Tuesday last, we are glad to see Septimus JONES, Esq., and his family, who have just returned from a trip home and a tour through Europe. Mr. JONES looks all the better for the relaxation he has enjoyed, and is no doubt ready for the discharge of the more arduous duties of an active business life.

ATTEMPTED SUICIDE – At Cape Town on Saturday afternoon a young man named ADAMS attempted to commit suicide by cutting his throat with a razor. ADAMS arrived in the colony only a short since by a sailing vessel from England, where he is very respectably connected. Since his arrival he has been living at a boarding house in Strand-street, and has occasionally been subject to fits of depression of spirits, in one of which he attempted to take his life.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE
Arrived in Algoa Bay
Nov. 14 – African, R.M.S. (of Southampton), Capt. G. LARMER, from Table Bay 11th instant, Mossel Bay 13th instant, for this port; Passengers: For this port – Mr. and Mrs. JONES, child and nurse, Mr. and Mrs. GEARD, Dr. and Mrs. NEWNHAM, Mr., Mrs., and Masters ([3]) HOLMES, Mrs. and Masters ([3]) CAROLIN, Mr. Advocate and Mrs. KOTZE, [3] children, and nurse, Mr. and Mrs. ELTON, Mr. and Mrs. [FOULIS], child, and nurse, Mr. and Mrs. HUR[…], Mr. and Mrs. HEINEMAN, Mrs. and Master JENKINS, Mrs. [HOWE] and 2 children, Mrs. ROBERTS and 3 children, Mr. and Mrs. [HORT] and 4 children, Mr. and Mrs. [SCHILTHOF], Mr. J. and Miss HORT, Mr. and Misses (2) SCHAFFNER, Mesdames MICHAEL, BAD[COCK], [MONSUR], WOODRUFFE, and LOUGH, Misses JONES, [HALLACK], [DIXON], HAZELTON, WILMOT, [I.] RALFE, H. TEMPLE, [F. KEYTON], BRO[ANCHON], and FRANCIS, Revs. H. KROLL and D. [BOAZ], Prince ACHMAT, Messrs. TUDHOPE, DOWSETT, [HENS]MAYER, [HUGGE], CLARKE, GEARD, W[ISE], [BRICK]FORD, NEILL, HILDER, [R. N.] NORRIS, PHILLIPS, PARKYN, ASPINALL, [TUCK], [G]EARD, HOFFMAN, [D]EGENSTEIN, WILSTONE, ROBERTSON, YATES, THORNE, BANKS, REICHENBACHER, VOIGT, TURNER, DREYER, WOL[STREN], CHARLTON, ELTON, [STEBBE], HILL, and DAVIDSON; For East London – Mr. and Mrs. JAMIESON, Mr. and Mrs. KNIGHT and 2 children, Mr. and Mrs. HO[S]KINGS, Mrs. BEER and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. SUTHERLAND, Mrs. JONES and daughter, Mrs. [R]ENNIE, Col. EUSTACE, Lieut. CARRINGTON, Messrs. IRVINE, TRACEY, HODGSON, WALKER, SHAW, WILSON, CARMICHAEL, McNEILL, [ROMAN], HILL, TUCKER, REID, 1 sergeant and 1 man [24]th Regt., [13] men [H. F.], 13 men F.A.M. Police, and 21 natives.

MEETINGS IN INSOLVENT ESTATES
November 18 – At Richmond, in re Charl William GILDENHUSY [recte GILDENHUYS?], of Rhenosterfontein, division of Hope Town, third. I. P. J. VAN DER POEL, trustee. No. 5,618.
November 18 – At Richmond, in re Johannes Francois CILLIERS, of Eselsfontein, division of Richmond, farmer, first. No. 5,617.
November 18 – At Beaufort West, in re Abraham Joshua DE VILLIERS (deceased), late of Steyn’s Kraal, in the division of Beaufort West, first. No. 5,617.
November 20 – At Cradock, in re James SCHOOLING, of Cradock, carpenter, second. No. 5,625.
November 20 – At Cradock, in re George Frederick AUSTEN, of Cradock, special. George ARMSTRONG, trustee. No. 5,621.
November 20 – At Stockenstrom (query Seymour), in re Johannes Frederick BOTHA, of the division of Stockenstrom, farmer and carrier, second. No. 5,621.
November 20 – At Middelburg, in re Jan Marthinus EVERTSE (deceased), late of Middelburg, painter, first and final. No. 5,62[6].
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Stephanus MEINTJES, third. A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. 5,622.
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Willem Hendrik BRUMMER, of Graaff-Reinet, carrier (2nd surrender), second. No. 5,627.
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Jasper Francois Alwyn BOLLEURS, third. A. HARTZENBERG, jun., and C. A. T. DE GRAAFF, trustees. No. 5,622.
November 22 – At Port Elizabeth, in re David Ferguson STEWART, of Port Elizabeth, second. No. 5,626.
November 22 – At Port Elizabeth, in re James HASSAM, of Port Elizabeth, carter, second. No. 5,629.
November 22 – At Uitenhage, in re George Richard BOYS, of [Botshanger], in the division of Uitenhage, agriculturist and carrier, first. No. 5,629.
November 22 – At Port Elizabeth, in re Charles SONNENBERG, formerly of Queen’s Town, merchant, but at present residing at Kimberley, Griqualand West, diamond buyer, second. No. 5,627.
November 22 – At Uitenhage, in re Marthinus KROG, of Uitenhage, special. H. N. CHASE, trustee. No. 5,627.
November 22 – At Graham’s Town, in re Frederick LUCAS, special. [Hen.] H. ATTWELL, trustee. No. 5,6[28].
November 24 – At East London, in re Mathys Jacobus Human SNYMAN, of Kwelegha, division of East London, carrier, second. No. 5,626.
November 24 – At Fort Beaufort, in re Joseph Arthur TROLLIP, of G[…] Farm, near Alice, Victoria East, farmer and carrier, third. William J. QUIN and W. J. MUGGLETON, trustees. No. 5,626.
November 24 – At Fort Beaufort, in re Johannes Arnoldus VILJOEN, of Winterberg, division of Fort Beaufort, farmer, first. No. 5,63[…].
November 25 – At Richmond, in re Johannes Francois CILLIERS, of Eselsfontein, division of Richmond, farmer, second. No. 5,627.
November [25] – At Uitenhage, in re George Richard BOYS, of [Botshanger] in the division of Uitenhage, agriculturist and carrier, second. No. 5,629.
November 29 – At Aliwal North, in re Edward GARDNER, special. J. [STANDON], trustee. No. 5,629.
November 29 – At Cape Town, in re Abraham Joshua DE VILLIERS (deceased), late of Steyn’s Kraal, division of Beaufort West, second. No. 5,627.
November 29 – At Wodehouse (query Dordrecht), in re Nicolas Grobelaar OLIVIER, of the district of Wodehouse, third. Spencer FLEISCHER, trustee. No. 5,62[…].
November 29 – At Burghersdorp, in re Andries Albertus PIENAAR, of Ruiterskraal, division of Albert, farmer and shopkeeper, first. No. 5,6[28].
December [2] – At Fort Beaufort, in re Johannes Arnoldus VILJOEN, of Winterberg, division of Fort Beaufort, farmer, second. No. 5,6[30].
December 4 – At Cradock, in re Albert HADLOW, of Cradock, third, Robert HARE, trustee. No. 5,63[…].
December 4 – At Cradock, in re William Cathcart DONNELL, of Cradock, third, A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. 5,628.
December 5 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re James Charles HURFORD, third, A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. 5,628.
December [6] – At Burghersdorp, in re Andries Albertus PIENAAR, of Ruiterskraal, division of Albert, farmer and shopkeeper, second. No. 5,6[28].
December 12 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Pieter Gerhardus MAYNIER, special, A. HARTZENBERG, junior, trustee. No. 5,6[30].
December 14 – At Mossel Bay, in re [Theodore] Edward MEYER, of Oudtshoorn, third, James […] and John PA[…], trustees. No. […]
December 14 – At Mossel Bay, in re […] Marthinus CAMPBELL, of [Thorn] River, in the division of George, special, J. CAIR[NCROSS], trustee. No. […]
December 14 – At Mossel Bay, in re Robert HARRIS, of George Town, special, J. CAIR[NCROSS], trustee. No. […]

INTESTATE ESTATES
November 21 – At Graaff-Reinet, next of kin and creditors of Fredrika Elizabeth MEINTJES (born BLOM), of the Graaff-Reinet district, and surviving husband Willem Hendrik Stephanus MEINTJES, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,620. [Marriage of F. E. BLOM and W.H.S. MEINTJES: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:8PSQ-59T2]
November 22 – At Albert (qu[e]ry Burghersdorp), next of kin and creditors of Johanna Hendrina COETZEE (born DU PLESSIS), widow of Jacobus COETZEE, of the Albert district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,628.
November 23 – At Hanover, next of kin and creditors of Friederich Wilhelm TAIT, of the Hanover district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. [5,616].
November 24 – At Peddie, the paternal and maternal relations of the minors Friedricke BERLIN, Albertina BERLIN, and Carl Franz BERLIN, minor children of the late Carel Gottlieb Otto BERLIN, and subsequently deceased spouse, Henrietta Wilhelmina Christina BERLIN (born JUDENSCHWAGER), to appoint executors dative, &c., &c. No. 5,624.
November 25 – At Beaufort West, next of kin and creditors of Wilhelmina Maria LE GRANGE (born JANSE VAN RENSBURG), of the Beaufort West district, and surviving husband Pieter Andries LE GRANGE, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
November 28 – At Port Elizabeth, next of kin and creditors of William PYE, of the Port Elizabeth district, and subsequently deceased spouse Ann PYE (born BANKS), to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
November 29 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Edward HULLEY and his predeceased spouse Mary HULLEY (born GRADWELL), to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
November 29 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Thomas FRANCIS, the Elder, of the Albany district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,622.
November 30 – At Cradock, next of kin and creditors of Sarah Johanna Elizabeth FOURIE (born SANDERS), of the Cradock district, and surviving husband Johannes Hendrick FOURIE, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
December 1 – At Somerset East, next of kin and creditors of Anna Margaretha Caroline ERASMUS (born DE VILLIERS), widow of Lourens Jacobus ERASMUS, of the Somerset East district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,6[…].
December 6 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Mary Ann GODDARD (born HELY), of the Albany district, and surviving husband William GODDARD, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,623.
December 6 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of William McCARTER, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
December 8 – At Queen’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Cathrina [Cloina] Maria KIDSON (born ODENDAAL), of the Queen’s Town district, and surviving husband Joseph KIDSON, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,624.
December 8 – At East London, next of kin and creditors of Carl Herman Graeff, of the Oud[t]shoorn district, and surviving spouse, Ann GRAEFF (born BROWN), since remarried to August PABST, to appoint executors dative, &c.
December 12 – At King William’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Edward WAINWRIGHT, of the King William’s Town district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,626.
December 13 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Sarah Frances HOLLAND (born [TONGE]), widow of Robert HOLLAND, of the Albany district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,630. [DN: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QPWR-FVQG]
December 14 – At Middelburg, next of kin and creditors of Lambertus Albertus VAN HEERDEN, of the Middelburg district, and surviving spouse Louisa Petronella VAN HEERDEN (born BOTHA), to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,626.
December 20 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Dinah EVERLEY, of the Albany district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,6[27].
December 22 – At Eland’s Post, next of kin and creditors of Willem HAMMAN, of the Stockenstrom district, and his pre-deceased spouse Katrina HAMMAN (born JACOBS), to appoint executors dative, &c.
December 21 – At Fort Beaufort, next of kin and creditors of Mary Jane Cecil STOKES (born FELL), of the Fort Beaufort district, and surviving husband George Frederick STOKES, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,6[30]. [Marriage of M.J.C. FELL and G.F. STOKES: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:8PSQ-59T2]
December 27 – At Colesberg, next of kin and creditors of Hendrik Roedolf VORSTER, of the Colesberg district, and pre-deceased spouse Hendrina Francina VORSTER, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,6[30].

Tuesday 21 November 1876

LATEST TELEGRAMS
Kimberley
T. M[ortimer] SIDDALL, attorney, editor of Independent, arrested on Saturday evening on a criminal charge of slander, arising from statement of Independent against Major LANYON. Bail taken £6,000. Action for £10,000 damages commenced against ROBINSON, proprietor of Independent. [Further details of this case are given]
King William’s Town
POYNTING, of Oriental Bank robbery notoriety, arrested on Saturday. Said to be on strength of telegram from the Fields. POYNTING’s marriage was fixed for to-day.
Colour-Sergeant ELLIS, 26th Foot, shot himself on Saturday. Buried yesterday.

[The following is included in an account of the wreck of the St. Lawrence:]
The St. Lawrence […] was commanded by A. HYDE, R.N.R. […] She left London on September 27th, for Dublin, where the five companies of Buffs, numbering 150 men and 128 women and children, embarked for the Cape Colony. This coast seems an unlucky one for the Buffs, as about ten years ago the First Battalion was wrecked about a hundred miles from Simon’s Bay. No lives were lost. […] The following is a list of the officers of the 3rd Buffs: Colonel C. H. PEARSON, Major H. PARNELL, Captains C. J. HAMILTON, A. W. GILSTON, R. A. HICKSON, A. H. WYLD, Lieutenant R. S. MOODY, Sub-Lieutenants C. H. GORDON, D. F. LEWIS, H. R. KNIGHT, D. [CREWN], Staff-Commander and Adjutant A. C. JACKSON, Quartermaster W. [G.] MORGAN, Attached Surgeon-Major [R.] WALKER, Sergeant-Major P. MURPHY, Bandmaster R. SWEENEY, Schoolmaster J. ECCLES, Quartermaster-Sergeant J. GREEVES, Sergeant-Instructor of Musketry T. WORBOYS, Paymaster-Sergeant J. FAIRPLAY, C.R. Clerk J. CROSLAND, Drum-Major J. GRESSOR, Attached Arm-Sergeant W. WIRNHAM, and 162 men, women, and children.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT – Before A.C. WYLDE, Esq., CC and RM
Monday, November 20, 1876
Thomas JANTJIE was charged with stealing a knife, the property of Mr. Charles KROMM. Prisoner went to the prosecutor’s eating-house, and, having finished his meal, walked off with the knife. Mr. KROMM said he had lost seven dozen knives in five months. Sentenced to seven days’ hard labour.
BOOY was charged with using abusive and threatening language to Martin DOYLE. DOYLE is in charge of a road party, the prisoner being one of the men under his charge, and he had frequently used insulting and threatening language, and on Saturday he threatened to kill the overseer. Fined £1, or 14 days’ imprisonment.
William [HUMAN] was charged on remand with stabbing JACOB. The injured man is still in the Hospital. BOOY, who was the prisoner in the previous case, deposed to [HUMAN] having committed the offence with which he was charged. Remanded for the attendance of Dr. EDWARDS.
Kitty BOYD was charged with using abusive and threatening language to Patrick FLANNIGAN, a boatman. Fined 10s., and ordered to find security to keep the peace.
Jacob and Leah GUITES were charged on remand, with fra[u]dulent insolvency. Mr. DYASON for the prosecution, Mr. INNES for the defence. J. [LÖBNER], assistant to Mr. Paul PERRIN, deposed: I recognise five watches and one case as having been sold and delivered to GUITES. Mr. DYASON: They are the watches Mrs. GUITES claims as hers. Examination continued: The silver watch produced I sold for £11 10s., a second for 52s., a third for 52s., a fourth for [46]s., and a fifth for 52s. They were all delivered to Mr. GUITES. The case produced contained a watch valued 54s. I sold him more watches than those produced. They were all sold at the same time, and the total value was £34. It was all entered in a book. J. BLOCH identified four watches, of the value altogether of £11, which he sold to the male prisoner. By Mr. INNES: There are marks on the watches by which I identify them. No one keeps the same watches as I. Mr. INNES: Copper ones, you mean. Witness: I have sold him a brass watch for 30s. The case was again adjourned, His Worship expressing his willingness to take bail in £[50] for Jacob GUITES’s appearance.

LATEST NATAL AND TRANSVAAL NEWS
The following was the news we got from the Transvaal by last week’s mail: An American, named Charlie DEANS, had been murdered by Kafirs, and mutilated. […] Dr. SCHOBEL had been appointed Landdrost of the Gold Fields.

LOCAL AND GENERAL

Hanover – A “Court of Resident Magistrate” has been established at Hanover, and Charles Richard BEERE, Esq., has been appointed Resident Magistrate there.

REHABILITATION – Mr. John WILLIAMS, hotel-keeper, of Port Elizabeth, it is officially notified, has received his rehabilitation and discharge by the Master of the Supreme Court.

MEDICAL NOTICE – Dr. SQUIRE, M.R.S.C., L.S.A. London, notifies, for the information of residents at Humansdorp, that he is now practising as a physician and surgeon at the above place.

POSTAL– A postal agency has been established at Driekoppen, division of Uitenhage, and Mr. FLETCHER has been appointed as post-office agent there.

DEATH OF MR. FLACK – We regret to hear that a telegram was received in town yesterday announcing the death at Cape St. Frances of Mr. FLACK, of the Public Works department. Mr. FLACK was engaged in superintending the creation of the lighthouse, and in the course of his connection with the colony has carried out many important works.

We (Argus) observe from the English newspapers that a new novel has been published by the author of Ingram Place. The title is Power’s Partner, and it is in three volumes. The name of the writer is this time given, and it is Miss May BYRNE, a young lady resident in Cape Town. […]

KING WILLIAM'S TOWN – A case has just been tried in the Resident Magistrate’s Court, King William’s Town, McGILLIEWIE vs BARNES, on a promissory note for £55 7s., the signature of which, D. G. BARNES & Co., defendants denied. […] Judgment was given for defendant, the plaintiff to pay all costs. – Argus.
Manslaughter at Sand Flats – At the criminal session of the Eastern Districts’ Court, BEETJE, alias PUNCH, and John BRANDY, labourers residing at Sand Flats, were charged with the murder of a labourer named JOE, at Sand Flats, on the 2nd June last. Prisoners were defended by Mr. Advocate BROWN. After hearing the evidence and the counsel for the defence, the jury found prisoners guilty of manslaughter, and the Court sentenced them each to twenty years’ imprisonment with hard labour.

APPOINTMENTS – John Thomas EUSTACE, Esq., to be a magistrate under and for the purposes of Acts 26 and 27 Vict. Cap. XXXV entitled “An Act for the prevention and punishment of offences committed by Her Majesty’s subjects in South Africa”; Charles Richard BEERE, Esq., to be Resident Magistrate for the district of Hanover, from the date of his assuming the duties of the said office, also to be a Road Magistrate under the provisions of Ordinance No. 9 of 1845; also to be one of the commissioners for examining the protocols and registers of notaries public practising in the district of Hanover, from the date of assuming the duties of the said office.

The R.M.S. Walmer Castle, Captain [N.] P. WEBSTER, left this port on Friday afternoon last for London, via Mossel and Table Bays, with […] the following passengers: For Mossel Bay – Mr. E. T. ANDERSON; For Cape Town – Mrs. PIERS, Mrs. WALLACE, Miss BAUMANN, Assistant Commissary-General McGILL, Deputy Commissary BENNETT, Mr. J. WALLACE, Mr. F. WALLACE, Mr. ELTON, Mr. TITTERTON, Mr. W. MEYER, Mr. W. TURNER, Mr. MILLS, Mr. OLDFIELD, 1 deck passenger; For London – Miss COOPER, Mr. BISSEKER, Mr. G. B. CHADWICK, Mr. J. FORD, [two illegible names].

THE ALBANY RANGERS – A new corps of mounted volunteers has just been formed at Salem, under the title of “The Albany Rangers.” A meeting was held there on Saturday last, when there was a large attendance. Fifty men were enrolled and took the oath of allegiance, and several more have promised to join. Mr. John GARDNER was unanimously elected Commandant, and the meeting then elected their officers by ballot with the following result: Mr. S. [B.] SHAW, Lieutenant; Mr. [J.] HAYES, Sub-lieutenant; Messrs. W. [ENSLIN] and W. ATTWELL, sergeants; and Messrs. [BUTT] and G. HILL, corporals. […] We understand that Lieut. SIMPKINS, the Inspector of the Divisional Police, has consented to act as drill instructor to the corps.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE
Arrived in Algoa Bay
November 18 – Dunrobin Castle, R.M.S. (of London), Captain J. HOWSON, from Table Bay 15th last, Mossel Bay 17th do., for this port. […] Passengers: For this port – Mr. and Mrs. WILMOT, Miss WILMOT, Miss M. WILMOT, Miss MURRAY and 2 servants, Mr. M. C. ANGEL, Mr. ZEEDERBERG, Mr. PHAYRE, Mr. [KUBE], Mr. G. B. CHRISTIAN, Mr. J. BRISTER, Miss BRISTER, Miss Mary BRISTER, Miss Ruth BRISTER, Miss Mabel BRISTER and servant, Mr. and Mrs. HORTON, Master HORTON, Miss HORTON, Master A. HORTON, Miss M. HORTON, Miss C. HORTON, and maid, Rev. Mr. and Mrs. [B]AXTER, Mr. and Mrs. WATSON, Miss WATSON, Master WATSON, Mr. WAGNER, Mr. Christopher GRIEVE, Mr. John and Mrs. GUNSTONE, Miss GUNSTONE, Master GUNSTONE, Mr. John [RAWLE], Mr. George CLARK, Mr. George CLARK, jun., Mr. William BEAR, Mr. Thomas BARNES, Mr. Tobias MITCHELL, Mr. RI[…]AIER, Mr. John STAVAN, Mr. Henry WITFORD, Mr. Thomas and Mrs. BAKER, Master BAKER, Miss BAKER, Master John BAKER, Mr. H. VAN PRAAGH, Mr. George [DAVID]SON, Mr. H. B. GOWER, Mr. H. A. HOLMES, Mrs. FOREST, Mrs. ARMSTRONG, Master ARMSTRONG, Miss ARMSTRONG, Miss Florence ROBINSON, Mrs. John ANDERSON, Miss [S.] GOODALL, Miss BEARDWELL, Mr. George [B]LAINE, jun., Mrs. James McFARLANE and maid, Mr. George CASTLEDEN, Miss EDMONDS, Miss CROSSMAN, Mrs. NOYES, Mr. F. A. NOYES, Miss NOYES, Miss Edith NOYES, Mr. C. E. CLARKE, Mr. James BUTLER, Mr. W. THOMAS, Mr. Michael LISMOOR, Mr. Thomas EVANS, Mr. Josiah TREVERTHEN, Mr. Wm. J. [R]OWE, Mr. John NORTHLY, Mr. Edmund BROWN, Mr. George GILBERT, Mr. John SAMPSON, Mr. W. RICHARDSON, Mr. RICHARDSON, Mr. John [SE]DGEMOOR, Mr. Samuel WILLIAMS, Mr. John [RE]ARDON, Mr. Thomas WILLIAMS, Mr. Thomas NOYLE, Mr. Charley HARVEY, Mr. Richard BOLT, Mr. Joseph LOBB, Mr. Samuel MAY, Mr. Richard MAY, Mr. Thomas and Mrs. [JACKET], Mr. and Mrs. […]CHEL, 5 children and servant, Mrs. SMITH and [3] children, Mrs. FOSTER, Mrs. PULLEN, Misses ROBSON, BROWN, [ALLPRESS], and STEWART, Captains FRASER and PAULIN, Messrs. [SCHABBEL], G. CHASE, J. MACKAY, VAN VUREN, AT[…], B. LAGERWEIL, B. LAURENCE, SH[…]TH, MARTIN, and [5] deck passengers; For East London – Mr. and Mrs. CHESTERTON, Mrs., Miss, and Master [BIRNIE], Mrs. [JURA] and child, Messrs. H. E. READ, STA[…]Y, [LANE], WELBY, BED[BROW], K. SHAW, M. T. PRESTON, W. H. [SLOMAN], H. BROWN, W. HAYDEN, H. [SAMAIN], J. MA[…]BEL, and IMM[…]; For Natal – Sir Benjamin PINE, Mr. C. L. REDWOOD, Rev. [O.] and Mrs. WATKINS, Master WATKINS, Master Owen WATKINS, Miss Mary WATKINS, and servant, Mr. K[…]ton WYNNE, Mr. D. TAYLOR, Ars. A. HILL, Miss HILL, Master HILL, Mr. and Mrs. MINETT, Miss MINETT, Mr. WHITTAKER, Mr. R. W. BRYANT, Mr. and Mrs. TAYLOR, Miss TAYLOR, Master TAYLOR, Miss M. TAYLOR, Miss E. TAYLOR, Master J. TAYLOR, Miss HUTCHEON and servant, Mr. and Mrs. STUMPF, Miss STUMPF, Miss Hermine STUMPF, Master STUMPF, Miss Henrietta STUMPF, Master George STUMPF, Mr. C. VAN H[EVER]HOTEN, Miss [COM]RIE, Mr. REID, Mr. Edgar HARDEN, Mr. Geo. POSTELL, Mr. and Mrs. HILL, Master HILL, Mr. Maurice JONES, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund JEFFREYS, Lieut. WALSH, Mr. H. GEDDES, Mr. G. DE [FRAISE], sergeant R.[E.], wife and [4] children, 1 man 13th Regt.
Nov. [19] – Helen White, , Capt. J. DALZIEL, from Adelaide 30th August for this port. […] Passengers: Captain’s wife and 2 children, Messrs. [S.] WHITE, A. STUART, W. EDWARDS, J. YOUNG, and J. RICHARDS.

MEETINGS IN INSOLVENT ESTATES
November 22 – At Port Elizabeth, in re David Ferguson STEWART, of Port Elizabeth, second. No. 5,626.
November 22 – At Port Elizabeth, in re James HASSAM, of Port Elizabeth, carter, second. No. 5,629.
November 22 – At Uitenhage, in re George Richard BOYS, of [Botshanger], in the division of Uitenhage, agriculturist and carrier, first. No. 5,629.
November 22 – At Port Elizabeth, in re Charles SONNENBERG, formerly of Queen’s Town, merchant, but at present residing at Kimberley, Griqualand West, diamond buyer, second. No. 5,627.
November 22 – At Uitenhage, in re Marthinus KROG, of Uitenhage, special. H. N. CHASE, trustee. No. 5,627.
November 22 – At Graham’s Town, in re Frederick LUCAS, special. [Hen.] H. ATTWELL, trustee. No. 5,6[28].
November 24 – At East London, in re Mathys Jacobus Human SNYMAN, of Kwelegha, division of East London, carrier, second. No. 5,626.
November 24 – At Fort Beaufort, in re Joseph Arthur TROLLIP, of G[…]ia Farm, near Alice, Victoria East, farmer and carrier, third. William J. QUIN and W. J. MUGGLETON, trustees. No. 5,626.
November 24 – At Fort Beaufort, in re Johannes Arnoldus VILJOEN, of Winterberg, division of Fort Beaufort, farmer, first. No. 5,63[…].
November 25 – At Richmond, in re Johannes Francois CILLIERS, of Eselsfontein, division of Richmond, farmer, second. No. 5,627.
November 27 – At Oudtshoorn, in re Jan H. VAN ROOYEN, of Oudtshoorn, agriculturist, first. No. 5,631.
November 27 – At Wodehouse (query Dordrecht), in re Johannes Jacobus Petrus LABUSCHANGE [sic], farmer, first. No. 5,631.
November [29] – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Hendrik August ENSLIN, H’s son, of Graaff-Reinet, agriculturist and brickmaker, first. No. 5,631.
November [25] – At Uitenhage, in re George Richard BOYS, of [Botshanger] in the division of Uitenhage, agriculturist and carrier, second. No. 5,629.
November 29 – At Aliwal North, in re Edward GARDNER, special. J. [STANDON], trustee. No. 5,629.
November 29 – At Cape Town, in re Abraham Joshua DE VILLIERS (deceased), late of Steyn’s Kraal, division of Beaufort West, second. No. 5,627.
November 29 – At Wodehouse (query Dordrecht), in re Nicolas Grobelaar OLIVIER, of the district of Wodehouse, third. Spencer FLEISCHER, trustee. No. 5,626.
November 29 – At Burghersdorp, in re Andries Albertus PIENAAR, of Ruiterskraal, division of Albert, farmer and shopkeeper, first. No. 5,630.
December 2 – At Fort Beaufort, in re Johannes Arnoldus VILJOEN, of Winterberg, division of Fort Beaufort, farmer, second. No. 5,630.
December 4 – At Cradock, in re Albert HADLOW, of Cradock, third, Robert HARE, trustee. No. 5,6[26].
December 4 – At Cradock, in re William Cathcart DONNELL, of Cradock, third, A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. 5,628.
December 4 – At Oudtshoorn, in re Jan H. VAN ROOYEN, of Oudtshoorn, agriculturist, second. No. 5,631.
December 4 – At Wodehouse (query Dordrecht), in re Johannes Jacobus Petrus LABUSCHANGE [sic], farmer, second. No. 5,631.
December 5 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re James Charles HURFORD, third, A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. 5,628.
December 5 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Hendrik August ENSLIN, H.’s son, of Graaff-Reinet, agriculturist and brickmaker, second. No. 5,631.
December [6] – At Burghersdorp, in re Andries Albertus PIENAAR, of Ruiterskraal, division of Albert, farmer and shopkeeper, second. No. 5,630.
December 12 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Pieter Gerhardus MAYNIER, special, A. HARTZENBERG, junior, trustee. No. 5,630.
December 14 – At Mossel Bay, in re Theodore Edward MEYER, of Oudtshoorn, third, James STUBBS and John CAIRNCROSS, trustees. No. 5,630.
December 14 – At Mossel Bay, in re Ignace Marthinus CAMPBER (deceased), of Doorn River, in the division of George, special, J. CAIRNCROSS, trustee. No. 5,630.
December 14 – At Mossel Bay, in re Robert HARRIS, of George Town, special, J. CAIRNCROSS, trustee. No. 5,630.

INTESTATE ESTATES
November 22 – At Albert (qu[e]ry Burghersdorp), next of kin and creditors of Johanna Hendrina COETZEE (born DU PLESSIS), widow of Jacobus COETZEE, of the Albert district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,628.
November 23 – At Hanover, next of kin and creditors of Friederich Wilhelm TAIT, of the Hanover district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. [5,616].
November 24 – At Peddie, the paternal and maternal relations of the minors Friedricke BERLIN, Albertina BERLIN, and Carl Franz BERLIN, minor children of the late Carel Gottlieb Otto BERLIN, and subsequently deceased spouse, Henrietta Wilhelmina Christina BERLIN (born JUDENSCHWAGER), to appoint executors dative, &c., &c. No. 5,624.

Friday 24 November 1876

BIRTH, at Richmond, on the 24th ult., Mrs. John MAXWELL, of a Daughter.

BIRTH on the 22nd instant, at Alster Villa, Mrs. A. KAEMPFFER, of a Son.

LATEST TELEGRAMS
Cape Town
Wednesday afternoon
Syria leaves November 3 [from Plymouth]. Passengers for Algoa Bay – Messrs. MARKS, RAPHAEL, NORDEN, CHERRY, LEWIS, COHEN, PINCHIN, ELLIOTT, EMANUEL, BLISS; Mr. and Mrs. ARNHOLZ, Mr. and Mrs. HASSAN, Mr. and Mrs. BEDDENBRI[DGE], Misses PEARSON, NORDEN, M[ARK].
Thursday
Fire in Gardens last night. House and contents, of Mrs. BIDEN, destroyed.

LOCAL AND GENERAL

The Frontier Guardian chronicles the first marriage in that district of a Dutch couple in the English Church. The happy couple were Miss Margita Aletta Elizabeth [KOLBE] and Mr. Gert Derk P[…] ALBERTSE, of the Burghersdorp district. The Rev. A. LOMAX performed the ceremony, and as neither bride nor bridegroom understand English, the service was translated into Dutch by Mr. VAN COLLER, clerk to the Resident Magistrate,

SHEFFIELD vs. GEART – Judgment was given in the Eastern Districts’ Court on Tuesday morning in the above case. Mr. Justice SMITH read a long and elaborate judgment against the appellant, and sustaining the decision of the Magistrate in the court below. Mr. Justice DWYER gave a judgment altogether at variance with that of his learned brother, so that the court has again, for the second time during one week, proved its unsatisfactory constitution, and the necessity for its being rendered complete by the appointment of a third Judge.

NARROW ESCAPE – On Thursday, at Piquetberg Road Station, the lightning entered the kitchen window of the station master’s house, passing through the parlour (all the windows being open at the time), and, entering the office, struck the telegraph instrument, causing a report as loud as a cannon. Mr. FORRESTER, the station master, and Mr. FENWICK, the inspector, were sitting in the parlour at the time, and had a narrow escape. The lightning passed within a foot of them. After the report was heard they went to examine the instrument, but the office was so completely filled with smoke that they had to wait some time before they could ascertain the damage done. As soon as an examination was possible they found that the instrument had been rendered unfit for work, and the earth-wire completely destroyed.

APPOINTMENTS – James SHIELS, Esq., to be a special justice of the peace at Ventersberg, district of Albert, under Act No. 10 of 1876, during pleasure, with jurisdiction as indicated by Proclamation No. [34] of the 16th instant. [C.] E. AMOS to be fieldcornet of the ward Lower Tyumie, in the division of Victoria East, in the room of M. John AMOS, resigned. W. A. HUDSON, Esq., to be one of the commissioners for examining the protocols and registers of notaries public practising in the district of Hanover, from the date of assuming the duties of that office. Sergeant John COCHRANE, of the Frontier Armed and Mounted Police, to be a sub-inspector in that force; appointment to date from 1st October, 1876. Sergeant Edward [MELTON], of the Frontier Armed and Mounted Police, to be a sub-inspector in that force; appointment to date from 1st October, 1876.

A HARD CASE – When the Resident Magistrate had taken his seat on the Bench on Wednesday morning last, the Chief Constable brought to his notice the fact that a woman named Mrs. FLYNN had been arrested on a judgment obtained by Messrs. SMITH Bros. for a debt of £12 16s. and was then in custody. He did not think there was any accommodation for female debtors in the New Prison. His Worship: If that is the case, you cannot admit her. The Chief Constable: The poor woman has three small children entirely dependent on her earnings. During the twenty-five years I have been here I have never before had to arrest a woman for debt. At the conclusion of the business, His Worship had the woman brought before him, and asked her if she had any friends that would pay the debt for her. The woman then entered at some length into her circumstances, the gist of her story being that she had no friends and no money. In consequence of illness she had got into debt. If she could get work, she would try and pay Messrs. SMITH. His Worship: If they put you in prison you must take the children there, and they will have to keep them too. You must ascertain if there is any accommodation in the prison, and if not, she must be released.

BANKRUPTCY – Insolvencies declared. Nov. 16, Emilie SPILLMANN, of Dordrecht, Wodehouse division, hotel-keeper: assets £616 13s. 4d., liabilities £778 17s. 9d., deficiency £162 4s. 5d.; 16th, William KEYS, of Fort Beaufort division: assets £2,242 17s., liabilities £3,400 13s. 9d., deficiency £1,157 16s. 9d.; 16, John AMOS, of Woest Hill, Albany division, farmer: assets £174 10s., liabilities £435 11s. 6d., deficiency £261 1s. 6d.; 16, Samuel PIKE, of Peddie division, carrier: compulsory sequestration granted provisionally; assets and liabilities unknown.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT – Before A.C. WYLDE, Esq., CC and RM
Tuesday, November 21, 1876
Jacob GUITES was again placed in the dock, charged with fraudulent insolvency. Mr. DYASON for the prosecution, Mr. INNES for the defence. Mrs. Cornelius [ROB], wife of Henry [ROB], farmer, Oatlands, Uitenhage, said: I know Mrs. GUITES, as she and her son came to my house and engaged a room for a month. This occurred in the middle of October, so far as I can recollect. Mrs. GUITES said her husband was up-country “smousing,” and she wanted the room to put her things there. I showed them to Mr. SCHRUNK. The things she put in the room were soft goods. There was also a small box, but I don’t know what it had in it. I bought some prints of her, but never saw her take any away to sell. The man GUITES stopped at my house for a day or two. The piece of corduroy produced is similar to half a roll which Mrs. GUITES brought to my house. I was paid for my room 12s. a month. The male prisoner stopped at the house about a couple of weeks. Did not see him take any goods away. A man named SCHRUNK came, accompanied by the sheriff. Nathan COHEN, a traveller, said he was at the house of the prisoner in Queen-street either on the 12th or [13]th September. The prisoner was out, and his son came for witness, as his mother was very sick. Went for Dr. EDWARDS, and he ordered her some medicine. Sat up with her, and during the night she handed the boy some gold to save for her. It was in a belt. There appeared to be a good many coins, but he could not swear how much. Should think there was over £100. There were five pockets in the belt, and each had money in them. The boy then took the money in the other room. When Mr. GUITES came home witness was sent for. Mr. INNES: This has nothing to do with the prisoner; he was away at the time. Witness: Oh, yes, it has; we shall bring it home to him. Mrs. GUITES then said I must go into partnership with her husband. I consented, but afterwards, hearing he had a bad name in the Bay, I would not go up-country with him. By Mr. DYASON: The room is upstairs; there was no one present but I, Mrs. GUITES, and the boy. His Worship: I want to examine prisoner on the schedules he swore to. They have been accidentally sent to Cape Town. Shall I close now? Mr. DYASON: I think we must have these schedules in. His Worship: Can he get bail? Mr. INNES: The bail is fixed too high. His Worship: He has “done” all his friends, so they have deserted him. Mrs. GUITES here began a long story, and a man named SCHRUNK came forward and said, Can I ask that woman a question? His Worship: Certainly not. SCHRUNK: I should like to ask her why she offered me 10s. in the £ cash if I could get the other creditors to compound. The case was then adjourned for the production of the schedules.
Wednesday, November 22, 1876
Benjamin FAIR, a coloured man, was brought up on a warrant, charged with neglecting to join the barque Persia. As there was no prosecutor or any evidence the prisoner was discharged.
Thursday, November 23
Alexander HEATH was charged with assaulting Thomas WALKER. On Friday several children were playing outside WALKER’s shop, and he took a whip to drive them away. In so doing he hit one of HEATH’s children. HEATH went down to remonstrate with him, and his remonstrance took the shape of knocking him down and kicking him. The child was produced in court, and he evidently had a pretty severe cut across the leg. His Worship thought it very cruel of Mr. WALKER to strike the child, but defendant must not take the law into his own hands, and he must pay a fine of £1. He would not give complainant costs, as they were both in the wrong.

Tuesday 28 November 1876

BIRTH at Mimosa Dale, on the 11th November, the Wife of Mr. William K[…], of a Son.

BIRTH at Uitenhage, on the 19th [instant], the Wife of Dr. S. J. MEINTJES, [of a] S[on].

BIRTH at Port Elizabeth, on Monday, November 2[7]th, the Wife of Mr. G. [H.] WEDEKIND, of a Son.

MARRIED. By Special Licence, at Port Elizabeth, on the 21st inst., Michael W[illiam] SMUTS of Richmond, Civil Commissioner’s Clerk, to Emily Freeland, daughter of the late Charles DYASON, Esq.
[Marriage at https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:ZN5W-6F2M]

LATEST TELEGRAMS
Frontier Police – His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to appoint Sergeant Edward HETTON, of the Frontier Armed and Mounted Police, to be a sub-inspector in that force; appointment to date from the 1st of October, 1876.

TARKASTAD VOLUNTEERS – His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to approve of the following appointments in No. 2 Company of the Tarkastad Volunteers, under date 16th November, 1876, viz.: G. C. VENTER, gent., to be Captain; J. [U.] PARKER, gent., to be Lieutenant; Charles MURRAY , gent., to be Sub-Lieutenant.

COMPULSORY SEQUESTRATIONS – The estate of Jeremiah Daniel NEL, of Stuurpoort, division of Peddie, has been placed under compulsory sequestration, provisionally, by order of the Hon. Mr. Justice SMITH, bearing date the 14th day of November 1876, upon the petition of Edward Bailey DRIVER. The estates of Joseph MAHN and Julius FRIEDLANDER, both of Middelburg, general dealers, have been placed under sequestration provisionally, by order of the Hon. Mr. Justice FITZPATRICK bearing date the 21st day of November, 1876, upon the petition of the trustees of the Graaff-Reinet Bank.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT – Before A.C. WYLDE, Esq., CC and RM
Friday, November 24, 1876
William [HUMAN] was charged on remand with stabbing a fellow-workman on the road party, named JACOB. Dr. EDWARDS, who has been attending the injured man at the hospital, to which institution he was admitted on the 11th instant, said he was suffering from an incised wound on the upper part of the right foot, caused by a sharp instrument. The wound was five inches long, but little more than skin deep. It was not of a dangerous nature, and the man was recovering. He might be able to give evidence in a week.
William HOLLAND and John HOLLAND, Kafirs, were charged with entering a hut at the Location, and using threatening language to the occupants. The case was of a frivolous nature, and was dismissed.
[MANCANES] and [NERA] were charged with selling Kafir beer, at the Location, without a licence. The case was fully proved against the male prisoner, and he was fined £5. The woman was discharged. The fine was at once paid.
James FOSTER was charged with assaulting David BAXTER. A drunken row was going on in Strand-street, at which the complainant was sitting looking on, when suddenly defendant attacked him and kicked him in the eye, inflicting a serious wound. There was no desire to press the charge, and prisoner was fined £1, or seven days’ hard labour.
Ali ABDULLAH was charged with assaulting a man named Charles RICARDS. The affair seems to have commenced with a row between the respective parties, and ABDULLAH assaulted first Mr. RICARDS and then Mrs. RICARDS. Having done this he became abusive, and the police with difficulty removed him to the lock-up. In the struggle his arm was hurt, as he alleged by a blow from a constable’s staff, but this was disproved. The case was remanded.
William NORRIS was charged with taking the horse of Mr. David THEOPHILUS from his stable without his permission. Prosecutor did not appear, and the case was dismissed.
Henry DREILIFF, Johannes PASCALL, and William ZOERGER, German sailors, were charged with assaulting Mr. LANNIGAN. The complainant stated that at about ten o’clock the previous evening he was on his way to his cottage at the back of STEINMANN’s hotel, and saw six men standing in the yard laughing. One of them followed him down, and, on his turning and asking the reason, gave him a blow in the face which knocked him down. He could not identify the prisoners. The captain of prisoners’ ship said they were all three quiet men, and never drank. Case dismissed.
Gert PERSENT was charged with assaulting LENNINGS. The complainant deposed that he was on his way home through Strand-street early this morning when he saw the prisoner with his hand in a drunken man’s pocket. He seized him, telling him he was a detective. Prisoner hit him a smack, and he let him have another. Prisoner managed to escape, but a policeman recaptured him. Prisoner was further charged with leaving Mr. LOVEMORE’s service, and was remanded on that charge.
In addition to the above there were several cases of fighting in the street and drunkenness, the total number of prisoners being twenty.
Saturday, November 25.
Ali ABDULLAH was charged on remand with assaulting Charles RICARDS. […]
Gert PERSENT was charged with leaving the service of Mr. Charles LOVEMORE. Mr. LOVEMORE stated that the prisoner left his service some time since. He had been brought before the magistrate and ordered to return, but he failed to do so. His Worship sentenced him to pay a fine of £1, or one month’s hard labour.
Monday, November 27, 1876
Thomas FERGUSON, for loitering on the footpath, was fined 10s. The prisoner was one of a crowd hanging about the streets. Several persons were fined for contravening Municipal Regulations.
William WIBLIN was charged with assaulting a coloured man. Complainant drove some of defendant’s horses from his master’s land, and for this was pelted with stones. Fined 10s.
Pauline GUITES was charged with assaulting Esther JACKMAN, and a cross summons charged Esther JACKMAN with assaulting Pauline GUITES. Mr. COWEN appeared for Mrs. GUITES. Miss JACKMAN said she lived next door to Mrs. GUITES in Queen-street. On Wednesday, the 22nd, she was disturbed by Mrs. GUITES setting a Kafir to throw dirty water into the passage common to the two houses. She opened her side door to prevent more being thrown, and in stepping over the water stepped into Mrs. GUITES’ unenclosed yard. She spoke to the Kafir and told him to throw no more water down, as it was stinking, and if he persisted in doing it she would call a policeman. Mrs. GUITES then came out, struck her in the face, and used vile language concerning complainant and her sister. Mrs. GUITES’ son took up a piece of wood, and afterwards a broomstick, and told his mother to beat witness with it. She had put up with Mrs. GUITES’ language and conduct for twelve months, and could do so no longer. By Mr. COWEN: There is not a gutter in the passage common for both houses. I was quite aware that Mrs. GUITES had not been home for 14 days. I did talk to the Kafir in her yard. I did tell the Kafir not to throw the water there. I did not strike Mrs. GUITES; I wouldn’t touch her. I was not in a passion. I did not put my hand [to] her face. I did not call her names, nor tell her she had just come out of prison. I said she was a nuisance. Mr. BLOCH: She told the truth. His Worship: If you are not careful you will be locked up. You must not interrupt the Court in that matter. George PRITCHARD, a wheelwright and coach-builder, who was working near at the time, gave confirmatory evidence. Mrs. GUITES made use of bad language not fit to be repeated in Court, and was a nuisance in the neighbourhood. By His Worship: I have never heard Miss JACKMAN speak a word during the six months I have been there. A Malay woman also confirmed Miss JACKMAN’s evidence. Joseph GUITES, the son of the defendant, said that on Wednesday last his mother employed a Kafir to clean out the yard. He saw him throwing water into the passage. The passage was the only way to take things out of the yard. Miss JACKMAN came into the yard and told the Kafir to stop, and he did so. He told the man to go on with the work. His mother wanted Miss JACKMAN to go out, and Miss JACKMAN caught her by the hair and slapped her face. His Worship: Don’t tell any lies. Mr. COWEN: The boy is on his oath, and the Court has no right to prejudge the case in that manner. I shall dispense with his evidence further. The boy, I believe, is telling the truth. His Worship: I don’t, after the evidence of Mr. PRITCHARD. Witness: My mother wanted to slap her back, but she got away. His Worship: I am sorry to say I don’t believe you. Miss JACKMAN had a mark when she came to the court. How did she get it? Witness: She might have got it somewhere else. Mr. PRITCHARD didn’t see it, because it was behind the screen. Mr. COWEN, amidst occasional roars of laughter, of which he complained, said the boy’s evidence coincided with Mr. PRITCHARD’s, who said he did not see it all, as it was behind the screen. Miss JACKMAN deserved all she got for going into the defendant’s yard. His Worship: Well, the defendant must pay a fine of £1, and find security herself in £5 and one surety in £5 to keep the peace for six months. I am sorry I gave her bail. She is always in a row. The cross action was then called on, when Mr. O’BRIEN said he did not think, under the circumstances, Miss JACKMAN ought to be put to the indignity of going into the dock. Mr. COWEN characterised Mr. O’BRIEN’s interference as unprofessional and uncalled for. Miss JACKMAN, having pleaded not guilty, was allowed to be seated. Mrs. GUITES was then sworn, and gave her version of the case, which agreed with that of Miss JACKMAN, except that she said she told the latter not to interfere with the Kafir. She ordered Miss JACKMAN to leave the yard, but instead of doing so she took her by the hair, and struck her [in] the side. Miss JACKMAN: If I struck you, why didn’t you strike me back again? Witness: Because I am not as big as you. Mr. COWEN: You won’t believe the son, so I won’t call him. The fair way would have been to withhold sentence until you had heard both sides. Mr. PRITCHARD was again called, and said that Miss JACKMAN and Mrs. GUITES met half way, and the latter ordered the former out of her yard, and immediately struck her. They then got behind the partition, and he saw the boy hold a stick to his mother. Was quite certain Miss JACKMAN did not touch Mrs. GUITES before she was struck. His Worship was inclined to believe Miss JACKMAN, and dismissed the case.

Salem, in the district of Albany, has been appointed the seat of a Justice of the Peace Court, and William Henry Dawson MATTHEWS, Esq., J.P., has been appointed a special justice of the peace there, with jurisdiction over an area “within five miles of the premises occupied for the time being as a Court-[house] at Salem” under the provisions of Act No. [40] of 1876.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE
Arrived in Algoa Bay
Nov. [25] – Benledi, , Capt. J. W. BUCHANAN, from Table Bay 23rd Nov., for this port and East London. Passenger: Mr. SCOTT.
Nov. [25] – Kafir, R.M.S. (of Southampton), Capt. A. J. GARRETT, from Table Bay 23rd Nov., for this port, Zanzibar, and intermediate ports. Passengers: For this port – Mrs. TUDHOPE, Messrs. G. [T.] MARCHANT and MOSENTHAL; For Port Natal – Mr., Mrs., and Miss SCOTT, Mrs. ATTWOOD and infant, Misses BUCHANAN and MACFARLANE, Colonel SALTMARSH, Major CURRIE, Messrs. SCOTT, jun., A. P[…], W. H. [H]OWE, [PICARD], WILTSHIRE, LEWIS, BROOKE, J. and [H.] MAYNARD, [47] men, [13] women, […] children, and 1 man […].
Nov. 2[6] – Danube, R.M.S. (of Southampton), Capt. H. E. [DRAPER], from Table Bay 23rd inst., Mossel Bay 25th inst. for this port and East London. Passengers: For this port – Mr. and Mrs. A[…]B[…[LTS, Mr. and Mrs. [HUMANN], child and servant, Mr. and Mrs. BRUDDEN[BRUCK] and servant, Rev. and Mrs. MULLER and child, Mr. and Mrs. HAYMAN, child and servant, Mr. and Mrs. T. [K.] FULLER, Mr. and Mrs. W. FLEMING, Rev. Mr. and Mrs. [ROUS], Rev. Mr. and Miss HOFMEYR, Mr. and Mrs. GALPIN, Mr. and Mrs. CANAVAN and [4] children, Mrs. [WILCOCK] and 4 children, Mrs. HOWARD and 7 children, Mesdames FAIRBAIRN, [BOYSH…], ABRAMS, Misses ARNHOL[Z], NORDEN, [CHEU]RY, [MONCK], HALL, DANIELS, and BLUMENTHAL, Capt. WARREN, […], Messrs. RAPHAEL, PINCHIN, COHEN, [B]ABLE, [POR]GES, RUDOLPH, [BOTKIN], FA[LK]ER, HENDRICKS, EMANUELS, [HELSE], STEVENS, A[NSITZ], MOORE, WALDER, [BARNARD], CARLE and WHITE; For East London – Messrs. CARRINGTON, [D.] [FRASER], FRASER, [COKER], {G]RIDLEY, MARKS, THOMPSON, [BATH], NICHOLLS, WHITSON, COCHRANE, [CETNER], GREENWAY, MAY, GOLDSWORTHY, CHILDS, SMITH, MORGAN, DALE, WAY, HENDRY, INKSTER, KENNY, ADAMS, ROBINSON, VERMUEREN and COSACK.
Nov. 26 – African, R.M.S. (of Southampton), Capt. G. LARMER, from East London 25th Nov., Port Alfred 26th Nov., for this port. Passengers: For this port – Mrs. and Miss BAKER, Miss CURTIS, Messrs. LONG, LEVY, and GILFILLAN; For Cape Town – Messrs. NESBIT and STANDING; For London – Mrs. HARRIS, Messrs. JARVIS, I. FRANK, THOMAS, HUNT, and [THOREAU].
Nov. 30 – Dunrobin Castle R.M.S. (of London), Capt. J. H[O]WSON, from East London 26th Nov., for this port. Passengers: For this port – Miss C[…]LS; For London – Captains JONES and [HURST], Mr. H. WILSON.

MEETINGS IN INSOLVENT ESTATES
November [26] – At Uitenhage, in re George Richard BOYS, of [Botshanger], in the division of Uitenhage, agriculturist and carrier, second. Gazette, No. 5,629.
November 29 – At Aliwal North, in re Edward GARDNER, special. J. [STANDON], trustee. No. 5,629.
November 29 – At Cape Town, in re Abraham Joshua DE VILLIERS (deceased), late of Steyn’s Kraal, division of Beaufort West, second. No. 5,627.
November 29 – At Wodehouse (query Dordrecht), in re Nicolas Grobelaar OLIVIER, of the district of Wodehouse, third. Spencer FLEISCHER, trustee. No. 5,626.
November 29 – At Burghersdorp, in re Andries Albertus PIENAAR, of Ruiterskraal, division of Albert, farmer and shopkeeper, first. No. 5,630.
November 29 – At Graham’s Town, in re John AMOS of [Woest] Hill, division of Albany, farmer, first. No. 5,6[31].
November 29 – At Graham’s Town (query, no place stated), in re Albert R[U]DD, of Graham’s Town, third. Joseph HARD[WICKE], trustee. No. 5,6[…].
December 1 – At Fort Beaufort, in re William KEYS of the division of Fort Beaufort, farmer, first. No. 5,6[…].
December 2 – At Fort Beaufort, in re Johannes Arnoldus VILJOEN, of Winterberg, division of Fort Beaufort, farmer, second. No. 5,630.
December [3] – At Fort Beaufort, in re John RICHARDS, of Fort Beaufort, first. No. 5,6[…].
December 4 – At Cradock, in re Albert HADLOW, of Cradock, third, Robert HARE, trustee. No. 5,6[26].
December 4 – At Cradock, in re William Cathcart DONNELL, of Cradock, third, A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. 5,628.
December 4 – At Oudtshoorn, in re Jan H. VAN ROOYEN, of Oudtshoorn, agriculturist, second. No. 5,631.
December 4 – At Wodehouse (query Dordrecht), in re Johannes Jacobus Petrus LABUSCHANGE [sic], farmer, second. No. 5,631.
December 4 – At Wodehouse (query Dordrecht), in re [Emilie SPILLMANN], of Dordrecht, division of Wodehouse, hotel-keeper, first. No. […]
December 4 – At Middelburg, in re Isidore FRIEDLANDER, of Middelburg, merchant, first. No. 5,6[...].
December 4 – At Bedford, in re Abraham Lodewyk[ers] DU[RANDT], of Doornkloof, division of Bedford, first. No. 5,[…].
December 5 – At King William’s Town, in re James M[…], late of East London division, now of King William’s Town, trader, first. No. 5,[…].
December 5 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re James Charles HURFORD, third, A. HARTZENBERG, jun., trustee. No. 5,628.
December 5 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Hendrik August ENSLIN, H.’s son, of Graaff-Reinet, agriculturist and brickmaker, second. No. 5,631.
December [6] – At Burghersdorp, in re Andries Albertus PIENAAR, of Ruiterskraal, division of Albert, farmer and shopkeeper, second. No. 5,630.
December 6 – At Graham’s Town, in re John AMOS, of [Woest] Hill, division of Albany, farmer, first. No. 5,6[…].
December 6 – At Graham’s Town, in re James COBURN, heretofore of Graham’s Town, first. No. 5,634.
December 6 – At Murraysburg, in re Henry HEAD, of […]rpoort, in the division of Murraysburg, first. No. […].
December 9 – At Fort Beaufort, in re William KEYS, of the division of Fort Beaufort, farmer, second. No. 5,632.
December 11 – At Wodehouse (query Dordrecht), in re Emilie SPILLMANN, of Dordrecht, division of Wodehouse, hotel-keeper, second. No. 5,632.
December 12 – At Graaff-Reinet, in re Pieter Gerhardus MAYNIER, special, A. HARTZENBERG, junior, trustee. No. 5,630.
December 14 – At Mossel Bay, in re Theodore Edward MEYER, of Oudtshoorn, third, James STUBBS and John CAIRNCROSS, trustees. No. 5,630.
December 14 – At Mossel Bay, in re Ignace Marthinus CAMPBER (deceased), of Doorn River, in the division of George, special, J. CAIRNCROSS, trustee. No. 5,630.
December 14 – At Mossel Bay, in re Robert HARRIS, of George Town, special, J. CAIRNCROSS, trustee. No. 5,630.
December 14 – At Colesberg, in re Johannes Petrus Stephanus VAN DER WALT, of Fonteinje, in the division of Colesberg, third. Thomas J. [FLEWMAN], trustee. No. 5,6[…].
December 20 – At Oudtshoorn, in re Nicholas TRAUTMANN, of Oudtshoorn, baker, third. J. [ASCHER], trustee. No. 5,632.

INTESTATE ESTATES
November 28 – At Port Elizabeth, next of kin and creditors of William PYE, of the Port Elizabeth district, and subsequently deceased spouse Ann PYE (born BANKS), to appoint executors dative, &c. Gazette, No. 5,621.
November 29 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Edward HULLEY and his predeceased spouse Mary HULLEY (born GRADWELL), to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
November 29 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Thomas FRANCIS, the Elder, of the Albany district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,622.
November 30 – At Cradock, next of kin and creditors of Sarah Johanna Elizabeth FOURIE (born SANDERS), of the Cradock district, and surviving husband Johannes Hendrick FOURIE, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,621.
December 1 – At Somerset East, next of kin and creditors of Anna Margaretha Caroline ERASMUS (born DE VILLIERS), widow of Lourens Jacobus ERASMUS, of the Somerset East district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,6[…].
December 6 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Mary Ann GODDARD (born HELY), of the Albany district, and surviving husband William GODDARD, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,623.
December 6 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of William McCARTER, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,624.
December 6 – At Graham’s Town, in re George CHADWICK, of Graham’s Town, ironmonger, third. John CROXFORD, trustee. No. 5,631.
December 6 – At Graham’s Town, in re James EVERLY (deceased), of Graham’s Town, clerk, third. John CROXFORD, trustee. No. 5,631.
December 8 – At Queen’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Cathrina [Cloina] Maria KIDSON (born ODENDAAL), of the Queen’s Town district, and surviving husband Joseph KIDSON, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,624.
December 8 – At East London, next of kin and creditors of Carl Herman Graeff, of the Oud[t]shoorn district, and surviving spouse, Ann GRAEFF (born BROWN), since remarried to August PABST, to appoint executors dative, &c.
December 12 – At King William’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Edward WAINWRIGHT, of the King William’s Town district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,626.
December 13 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Sarah Frances HOLLAND (born [JONGE]), widow of Robert HOLLAND, of the Albany district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,630. [DN: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QPWR-FVQG]
December 14 – At Middelburg, next of kin and creditors of Lambertus Albertus VAN HEERDEN, of the Middelburg district, and surviving spouse Louisa Petronella VAN HEERDEN (born BOTHA), to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,626.
December 15 – At Port Alfred, next of kin and creditors of Thomas PIKE, of the Bathurst district, to appoint Executors Dative, &c. No. 5,621.
December 20 – At Graham’s Town, next of kin and creditors of Dinah EVERLEY, of the Albany district, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,6[27].
December 22 – At Eland’s Post, next of kin and creditors of Willem HAMMAN, of the Stockenstrom district, and his pre-deceased spouse Katrina HAMMAN (born JACOBS), to appoint executors dative, &c.
December 21 – At Fort Beaufort, next of kin and creditors of Mary Jane Cecil STOKES (born FELL), of the Fort Beaufort district, and surviving husband George Frederick STOKES, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,6[30]. [Marriage of M.J.C. FELL and G.F. STOKES: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:8PSQ-59T2]
December 27 – At Colesberg, next of kin and creditors of Hendrik Roedolf VORSTER, of the Colesberg district, and pre-deceased spouse Hendrina Francina VORSTER, to appoint executors dative, &c. No. 5,6[30].

MARRIAGE – The marriage is announced at Graaff-Reinet on Thursday morning of Mr. [L. N.] PEACOCK (of the firm of PEACOCK, HUMPHREY & Co.) to Miss STEABLER. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Canon STEABLER, father of the bride, and the service was choral, the hymns and psalms being sung by the choir with beautiful effect, accompanied on the organ by [Dr.] [ARENHOLD]. [Marriage: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:ZNGV-PBW2]

EAST LONDON
The Wesleyan congregation at Panmure have at length got a pastor, the Rev. C. PELLMAN, and on Thursday evening last an interesting meeting was held in the church for the purpose of welcoming him to the land of his adoption. […]

Calitzdorp, in the district of Oudtshoorn, has been appointed the seat of a Justice of the Peace Court, and Frederick BRINK, Esq., J.P., has been appointed a special justice of the peace there, under the provisions of Act No. 10 of 1876 (not 1875, as printed in the Gazette).

LOCAL AND GENERAL

Messrs. J. PATERSON, M.L.A., and W. A. HARRIES were to leave England for the Cape by the Edinburgh Castle on the 17th December.

Mr. R. W. GRACIE, accountant in the Standard Bank, Cradock, has received the appointment of manager of the branch just opened at Fraserburg.

Amongst the passengers for London per R.M.S. Walmer Castle, which left Cape Town on Thursday, were Mr. SCHULTZ, Madame Anna BISHOP, Mr. LASCELLES, and Miss PARKER.

Volunteering – Somerset now has a Volunteer corps of 50 men, of which Mr. LIEBERMANN has been elected Captain, Mr. P. SOUTHEY Lieutenant, and Mr. LIESCHING Sub-Lieutenant.

The S.S. Benledi, Capt. J. W. BUCHANAN, arrived here on Saturday morning last from London and Table Bay, with […] Mr. SCOTT as passenger.

The Standard and Mail has an obituary notice of the Rev. Robert SHAND, for forty-two years minister of the Dutch Reformed Church at Tulbagh, who died on Tuesday week from the effects of paralysis.

BURGLARY – On the night of the 15th inst. Mr. SANDERS’ store at Zoetfontein, district of Cradock, was broken into by a Hottentot, who managed to get away with a double barrelled rifle, some clothing, and liquor.

FATAL ACCIDENT – On Saturday afternoon, a little boy named William BREHANY, aged seven years and six months, a son of Mr. Patrick BREHANY, carter, was getting on to one of his father’s drays in [Eratt]-street, when his foot slipped and he fell to the ground. The wheels of the cart passed over his chest, and he sustained such injuries that he died shortly after being removed to the hospital.

The R.M.S. Kafir, Capt. A. J. GARRETT, arrived here on Saturday last from Table Bay, with a number of passengers. […] She left again the same evening for Zanzibar and intermediate ports, with the following additional passengers from this port: For East London – Mr. and Mrs. SHAW and child, Messrs. P. TROUP, A. DAVID, ABRAHAMSON, D. DYASON, and [H.] RUTHERFOORD. For Natal – Mrs. LEATHAM. For Delagoa Bay – Mr. SIMPKE.

On Sunday afternoon, as a young girl named Sarah HUGHES, living in Smart-street, Stone-street, was engaged in cooking, her dress caught fire. She at once rushed into the street, and as the wind was blowing she was soon enveloped in flames. Some one seeing her perilous position tore her clothes off and conveyed her back to the house, where she lay in the most excruciating agony. Two doctors were sent for, who recommended that she should be removed to the hospital. We understand that there was no roof on the kitchen where the accident occurred. – Argus.

POSTAL– His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to approve of the establishment of a postal agency at Brandewynskuil, Division of Victoria West, and of the appointment of Mr. H. C. BORGSTROM, as post office agent there, and also of the appointments of Mr. [J.] H. LANGLEY, as deputy postmaster at Sand Flats Station (Division of Alexandria), in the room of Mr. HARVEY, resigned, and of Mr. W. H. SHAW as deputy postmaster at Coega Station (Division of Uitenhage), in the room of Mr. LANGLEY, promoted. All these appointments have effect from the 1st instant.

The R.M.S. Anglian, Capt. A. CLARK, sailed from this port on Friday last for Southampton, via Mossel and Table Bays, with […] the following passengers: For Mossel Bay – Mrs. KANNEMEYER; For Cape Town – Mrs. TOMPKINS and [3] children, Mrs. ISAACS, Mrs. FLACK, Mrs. CHASE, Miss [ISSE], Mr. H. BROADWAY, Mr. A. PETERS, Mr. ATRA and child, Mr. H. McMULLAN, Mr. C. HEATH, Mr. [E.] MEERE, Mr. H. LAWRENCE, Mr. P. [N.] [HANBY], Messrs. JAPPARDTON ([3]), Sarah MICHAELS; For Southampton – Mrs. ALLAN, Mr. H. VON RENN, Mr. A. C. MILTON.

INSOLVENCIES – Nov. 20, John RICHARDS, of Fort Beaufort: assets £1,676 2s. 4d., liabilities £3,024, deficiency £1,347 17s. 8d.; Abraham Lodewykus DURANDT, of Doorn Kloof, division of Bedford, farmer: assets £80, liabilities £329 17s. 8d., deficiency £249 17s. 8d.; Isidore FRIEDLANDER, of Middelburg, merchant: assets £10,540 18s. 10d., liabilities £3[8],144 2s. 8d., deficiency £1[8,5]01 [5]s. 10d.; Jeremiah Daniel NEL, of Stuur Poort, division of Peddie, compulsory sequestration, granted provisionally, assets and liabilities unknown; November 21, Henry [REED], of Zuurpoort, division of Murraysburg: assets £1,112 9s. 7d., liabilities £1,889 1[9]s. 7d., deficiency £770 [8]s.; Nov. 22, Johannes Jurgens Abraham MARAIS, of French Hoek, trader: assets £222, liabilities £4[1]1 16s., deficiency £20[2] 16s.

APPOINTMENTS – Cornelius CO[C]K, Esq., to be a justice of the peace for the district of Bathurst, during pleasure; John Edward Charles HODGES, Esq., to be a justice of the peace for the district of Caledon, during pleasure; also as assistant to the resident magistrate of Caledon, under the provision of Act No. 9 of 1857 (Section 7); Richard Atholl NESBITT, Esq., Inspector of Frontier Armed and Mounted Police, to be special magistrate under Act No. 27 of 1868, entitled an Act “For the better protection of Her Majesty’s subjects on the northern frontier of the Colony,” in the room of Inspector D. B. HOOK, who relinquishes the office. The appointment to have effect from the date of his relieving Inspector HOOK; Albert WHITE, Esq., to be a justice of the peace for the district of Swellendam, during pleasure; Edwin George DEVENISH, Esq., to be a justice of the peace for the district of Fraserberg [sic], during pleasure; Mr. Cradock PARKIN to be field-cornet of the ward, Bushy Park, in the Division of Port Elizabeth, in the room of Mr. James Miller PARKIN, resigned; John Cowper STAPLETON, Esq., as issuer of process at Montagu, in the division of Robertson; Ryk le Sueur FISCHER, Esq., to act as registrar of deeds during the absence on leave of J. [E.] MONTAGU, Esq., from the 1[6]th inst.

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